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Too many egg yolks


binkyboots
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There is a good sable recipe "initial cookies" in the Joy of cooking. They are quite crunchy and very good looking when rolled thick, covered in egg wash and coarse sugar. They use 8 yolks and keep really well. Let me know if you want it.

chantal

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  • 7 months later...

Two batches of macaroons this weekend left me with 8 leftover egg yolks. I put 'em in the fridge for a while then went looking through my cookbooks for ideas on what to do with them.

I ended up making pots-de-creme from the Joy of Cooking. I used up the last half pound of the Ghiradelli semi-sweet chocolate in cupboard too!

What else can you do with all those yolks? I don't like the idea of just throwing them out. Any recommendations? Sweet or savory will do.

Thanks!!

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How about creme caramel? Here in the Philippines, a variation is more popular called LECHE FLAN. ;) I think you need only yolks, milk and sugar with this dish.

I am in the process of fulfilling a dream, one that involves a huge stainless kitchen, heavenly desserts and lots of happy sweet-toothed people.
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The "King Arthur Flour 200th Anniversary Ccok Book" has a recipe for Golden Angel Food Cake. It's made with whole wheat flour and uses the yolks left over from their regular Angel Food Cake recipe.

SB (I've made it. It works!) :smile:

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You could always make this which has been published all over the internet - RecipeLand, RecipeSource, several baking sites as well as in Diane Mott Davidson's book "Killer Pancake"

It is very good.

What to do with all the Egg Yolks Bread

2 1/2 teaspoons active dry yeast

1/4 cup sugar

1/4 cup warm water

3/4 cup skim milk

1/4 cup melted butter

1/2 cup canola oil

1 tablespoon chopped orange zest

1 teaspoon salt

4 egg yolks lightly beaten

3 1/2 cups all-purpose flour (to 4 cups)

3/4 cup sun-dried cranberries

1 cup chopped pecans

Butter a 10-inch tube pan; set aside.

In a large mixing bowl, combine the yeast, 1 tablespoon of the sugar and the warm water. Set aside for 10 minutes.

Combine the milk, butter, oil, zest and remainder of the sugar, and the salt and stir into the yeast mixture. Add the egg yolks, stirring well.

Add the flour 1/2 cup at a time, stirring well after each addition to incorporate the flour thoroughly.

Knead 5 to 10 minutes, until the dough is smooth, elastic, and satiny.

Knead in the cranberries and pecans.

Put the dough back in the bowl, cover and let rise at room temperature until it is doubled in bulk.

Using a wooden spoon, beat down the risen dough for about a minute.

Place the dough into the buttered tube pan and allow to rise at room temperature until doubled in bulk.

Preheat the oven to 375°.

Bake the bread for 45 to 50 minutes until dark golden brown and sound hollow when tapped.

Place on a rack to cool or serve warm.

Once cooled the bread is also excellent sliced and toasted.

Makes 1 large loaf.

I should add that this is one of the bread recipes I use for making "Monkey-Bread" -

After the first rise, I knead it down, form it into a long "rope" about 1 1/2 inches in diameter, cut it into pieces with a bench knife then dip each piece in melted butter, roll it in cinnamon and sugar (or for me, cinnamon and Splenda) then pack it into a tube pan, let rise and bake. I do it with or without the fruit and nuts.

Edited by andiesenji (log)

"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett

 

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You could also make a very nice bread pudding.

"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett

 

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creme anglaise, huevos reales, French buttercream, pate a bombe, lemon, lime, sour orange, or passionfruit ... or other ... curd, mayo, the hollandaise family of fine sauces, sauce gribiche, linzertorte dough ...

Salud,

Theabroma

Sharon Peters aka "theabroma"

The lunatics have overtaken the asylum

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I made these egg yolk cookies and have been getting rave reviews. I didn't make the exact recipe, I added lemon rind and juice instead of the lemon flavoring, and 8 egg yolks instead of six, and butter instead of shortening. I also substitued a gluten-free flour mix (this is starting to sound like an epicurious review) and added lots of ground cloves to make lemon clove cookies.

In any case, the cookies kind of remind me of the almond cookies you can get in Chinatown in terms of color, but they had great texture and flavor and kept for two weeks! To top it off I ended up with 24 little balls of dough in the freezer for craving time. I think this will be my go to egg yolk use-up recipe.

Recipe

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  • 1 year later...

Hey there,

I've been making a lot of royal icing recently for a gingerbread house (pictures of which I hope to upload to the appropriate thread soon), and I'm stuck with a bunch of egg yolks. I was hoping that I could maximize my egg use efficiency and make some delicious Christmas Cookies/Treats from them to give away as gifts. Naturally I've thought about Lemon Bars, but what I'm really looking for is something unique from you guys, plus I've already made a quadruple recipe of those. :wink:

Thanks for any help brainstorming!

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I would say any custard would be nice, but since you want to give them away as gifts, I suggest making Yema, which can be shaped into spheres or pyramids, then rolled in sugar or quickly coated in simple caramel for a crackly coating and wrapped in cellophane. (That's my Filipino contribution to this brainstorming :)

Mark

The Gastronomer's Bookshelf - Collaborative book reviews about food and food culture. Submit a review today! :)

No Special Effects - my reader-friendly blog about food and life.

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I would say any custard would be nice, but since you want to give them away as gifts, I suggest making Yema, which can be shaped into spheres or pyramids, then rolled in sugar or quickly coated in simple caramel for a crackly coating and wrapped in cellophane. (That's my Filipino contribution to this brainstorming :)

Thanks for the tip, they look delicious!

Another interesting note, the site with the recipe told a little anecdote about how a couple of yolk-focused recipes came to be in the Philippines:

Back when there was still no cement, indigenous materials were used. A lime mixture (compounds of calcium, not the citrus) combined with egg shells and egg whites, among others was applied to the walls to make it more durable. One can imagine how many thousands of eggs were used for one massive building. Since only the whites were used, the egg yolks had to be utilised as well. Thus we have various egg-based recipes, mostly desserts, such as leche flan and yemas.

Link

I knew this was an age-old conundrum!

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Hey there,

I've been making a lot of royal icing recently for a gingerbread house (pictures of which I hope to upload to the appropriate thread soon), and I'm stuck with a bunch of egg yolks. I was hoping that I could maximize my egg use efficiency and make some delicious Christmas Cookies/Treats from them to give away as gifts. Naturally I've thought about Lemon Bars, but what I'm really looking for is something unique from you guys, plus I've already made a quadruple recipe of those. :wink:

Thanks for any help brainstorming!

Mini key lime pies or tarts.

There's nothing better than a good friend, except a good friend with CHOCOLATE.
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Another interesting note, the site with the recipe told a little anecdote about how a couple of yolk-focused recipes came to be in the Philippines:

Back when there was still no cement, indigenous materials were used. A lime mixture (compounds of calcium, not the citrus) combined with egg shells and egg whites, among others was applied to the walls to make it more durable. One can imagine how many thousands of eggs were used for one massive building. Since only the whites were used, the egg yolks had to be utilised as well. Thus we have various egg-based recipes, mostly desserts, such as leche flan and yemas.

Link

I knew this was an age-old conundrum!

Another explanation that applies to the European egg-yolk biscuits etc is that they became a speciality of the convents - because the monks used the whites and shells in rrefining wine, and the leftover yolks were handed over to the nuns, who developed pastry expertise that earned income for the convent.

Happy Feasting

Janet (a.k.a The Old Foodie)

My Blog "The Old Foodie" gives you a short food history story each weekday day, always with a historic recipe, and sometimes a historic menu.

My email address is: theoldfoodie@fastmail.fm

Anything is bearable if you can make a story out of it. N. Scott Momaday

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I would suggest Filipino leche flan. A dozen+1 egg yolks, a cup of condensed milk, lemon rind, a drop or two of vanilla, mixed, strained and poured into a little leche flan pan called llanera that have been lined with caramelized sugar.. Steamed covered for 30 minutes and lift up the foil topped llanera and enjoy the most creamiest flan you've ever tasted.

I have tried to make this but as of now only my mother and my brother has succeeded in making creamy decadent leche flans. My hubby goes crazy over them.

Edited by Domestic Goddess (log)

Doddie aka Domestic Goddess

"Nobody loves pork more than a Filipino"

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You could also make some pretty good pasta. My favorite recipe takes about a dozen yolks to a batch, which is a sizable load o' yolks in my book and a big reason why I rarely make the favorite pasta (usually go with the standard 1-2 egg recipe). Then to really up the yolk dosage you could make ravioli filled with yolks... hmm... yolks.

You could also just use them to boost your cholesterol count by using or overusing them in food you may already be preparing in your home. There are egg white omelets; why not a yolk-only version? You can make mayonnaise with just one yolk, but why stop there?

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