Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

Too many egg yolks


binkyboots
 Share

Recommended Posts

In an effort not to waste them I have kept the egg yolks from a mega marshmallow/macaroon making session (I'm doing a bake stall tommorow)

but what to do with them? all that springs to mind is a fruit curd, but if there was something else I'd be up for trying it, fruit curd tends to get ignored in our fridge :wacko:

Spam in my pantry at home.

Think of expiration, better read the label now.

Spam breakfast, dinner or lunch.

Think about how it's been pre-cooked, wonder if I'll just eat it cold.

wierd al ~ spam

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 quart heavy cream

4 oz sugar

Boil

whisk into yolks

return to stove and stir 12 times

strain

add vanilla or other flavoring

Pour into dishes and cool 6 hours

Stovetop creme brulee

Flavorings to try

6oz melted chocolate

2T Powdered Ginger

Lemon zest

Pour warm mixture over mint leaves and steep a few minutes then strain

Instant coffee/espresso

Link to comment
Share on other sites

For recipes that use lots of egg yolks: Pan de Muertos http://starchefs.com/halloween/html/recipe_01.html (I made the recipe) and Zabaglione...

You can freeze left-over egg yolks: Lightly beat 1/4-cup yolks (3.5 or 4 yolks from large eggs; 1 egg yolk from large egg = 1 tablespoon plus 1/2 teaspoon), with 1/8 teaspoon salt (for use in savory recipes) or 1 to 1-1/2 teaspoons sugar (for use in sweet recipes). (If freezing one yolk, use a few grains of salt or a pinch of sugar).

Line another bowl with plastic wrap and pour the yolks into the lined bowl.

Freeze overnight until solid, then wrap the block securely and be sure to mark the date and number of yolks in the package. Double wrap the frozen yolks with plastic or seal with your home vacuum sealer and store in the freezer for up to 3 months. Some freeze one egg yolk per ice cube cavity in an ice cube tray, and then transfer them to a plastic, airtight bag.

To use, thaw in refrigerator and then mix well. They will not look the same as fresh egg yolks do, but they work just as well.

Edited by Sarah Phillips (log)

Happy Baking! Sarah Phillips, President and Founder, http://www.baking911.com

Link to comment
Share on other sites

You could always use the yolks as the liquid in bread...

I always attempt to have the ratio of my intelligence to weight ratio be greater than one. But, I am from the midwest. I am sure you can now understand my life's conundrum.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

400g flour.

Knead. Rest. Roll.

Pasta.

Seriously - this is a doable pasta recipe? I'm not questioning it really - it's just that the pasta recipe I usually use doesn't have anywhere near as much egg. If this is good, I'll be tremendously happy because I have been left with too many egg yolks too often. Last time I made - yes - lemon curd. Which was lovely but it's just not something you need a lot of.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Scroll to the bottom of this page

for a list of links to recipes that use lots of yolks, they are listed by the amount of yolks they use.

and here is a cookie recipe that uses 12 egg yolks!

"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

How about some of these - they are not very glamorous but extremely tasty and would be perfect for your sale if you can face any more baking.

Or maybe you could you make and sell lemon curd if your family doesn't like it?

MELTING MOMENTS

4 oz butter

3 oz sugar

1 egg yolk

A few drops of vanilla essence

5 oz self-raising flour

Crushed cornflakes or rolled oats

A few glacé cherries

Oven temperature: 375°F, 190°C

Yield: 20 biscuits

Lightly grease two baking trays.

Cream the butter and sugar together and beat in the egg yolk. Flavour with vanilla essence and fold in the flour. Form into a stiff dough and divide into 20 portions.

Form each piece into a ball and roll it in crushed cornflakes or rolled oats and place on the baking trays. Top each with a piece of cherry and bake towards the top of the oven for 15-20 minutes.

Cool on the baking tray for a few moments before lifting on to a wire rack.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

thank you for the suggestions, I think the breton cake takes it this time, it sounds marvelous!

however, I often have extra yolks, lol, I'll be trying the rest as they build up again :hmmm:

the freezing tip is excellent, I thought whites froze but yolks didnt so I'm very pleased indeed.

Spam in my pantry at home.

Think of expiration, better read the label now.

Spam breakfast, dinner or lunch.

Think about how it's been pre-cooked, wonder if I'll just eat it cold.

wierd al ~ spam

Link to comment
Share on other sites

the freezing tip is excellent, I thought whites froze but yolks didnt so I'm very pleased indeed.

Here's more information about eggs, as well as tips about freezing whites, for anyone's who is interested! http://www.baking911.com/pantry/eggs.htm

Happy Baking! Sarah Phillips, President and Founder, http://www.baking911.com

Link to comment
Share on other sites

and no-one mentioned home-made madeleines yet???? Whenever I make madeleines we save the whites to make angel food cake or meringues.

Whenever we make meringues I save the yolks to make madeleines...

Do you suffer from Acute Culinary Syndrome? Maybe it's time to get help...

Link to comment
Share on other sites

the freezing tip is excellent, I thought whites froze but yolks didnt so I'm very pleased indeed.

Here's more information about eggs, as well as tips about freezing whites, for anyone's who is interested! http://www.baking911.com/pantry/eggs.htm

Oh, you're the Sarah of 911? If so you should be unmasked. :biggrin: It's a great site, full of useful information. Indeed, an avalanche of information. Everyone should check it out.

Edited for typo

Edited by Mottmott (log)

"Half of cooking is thinking about cooking." ---Michael Roberts

Link to comment
Share on other sites

:biggrin: I couldn't agree more, that site rocks!

hmm.. the daddy sugar, will it melt into the cake, what I thought of doing was to take 500g of cube sugar and smash it up a bit with a rolling pin, that gives some larger lumps plus some pulverised sugar.

that's how I use it for a kind of sugary, butter bread, the large lumps melt during cooking into pockets of gungey syrup... is that what I'm aiming for with this cake or should I just use ordinary granulated?

Spam in my pantry at home.

Think of expiration, better read the label now.

Spam breakfast, dinner or lunch.

Think about how it's been pre-cooked, wonder if I'll just eat it cold.

wierd al ~ spam

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 Share

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.
×
×
  • Create New...