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confiseur

Torreblanca book

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.....some bads news...At a chocolate demonstration in Brussels recentlyI managed to catch up againwith the great Spanish patissier Paco Torreblanca. Unfortunately he is not planning to have his books translated into English as he is convinced there is no demand. I tried in vain to convince him otherwise but no luck,he was not convinced with my argument that I would buy 3 copies to start him off!...Suggestions please.. :sad:

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.....some bads news...At a chocolate demonstration in Brussels recentlyI managed to catch up againwith the great Spanish patissier Paco Torreblanca. Unfortunately he is not planning to have his books translated into English as he is convinced there is no demand. I tried in vain to convince him otherwise but no luck,he was not convinced with my argument that I would buy 3 copies to start him off!...Suggestions please.. :sad:

Raise it to four (copies)??? :laugh:

Maybe get someone to translate it for you just on a one to one basis.

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tan319   

It's not that hard to break down the recipes, even the technique's with a bit of perseverence and a translation program.

It's a drag to miss out on some ( ok, all ) of the textual nuances but it sure looks like a beautiful book.

Any chance he'll do a French version?

I have a couple of books that I've learned quite a bit from and they're only in Catalan.

Maybe we can organize an email campaign to the publisher, let him see the interest, if it's there.

PM me if interested.

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It's not that hard to break down the recipes, even the technique's with a bit of perseverence and a translation program.

It's a drag to miss out on some ( ok, all ) of the textual nuances but it sure looks like a beautiful book.

Any chance he'll do a French version?

I have a couple of books that I've learned quite a bit from and they're only in Catalan.

Maybe we can organize an email campaign to the publisher, let him see the interest, if it's there.

PM me if interested.

....Sorry to take so long to get back to this...have been in St Petersburg doing some consulting work where I also encountered a similar problem...there is, no doubt to the suprise of many some startlingly good work in Russian available but obviously printed in the native language...

(...yes, I know-the smartarse reply would be... 'learn Russian'..however the majority of pastry chefs I know here in Europe do not have the inclination and certainly not the time to get their head around the cyrillic alphabet... no doubt with exceptions it is the same on your side of the pond...)

I was informed by the author of the one book in Russia I was impressed with that they were convinced there would be no demand for the material to be translated...similarly with Paco Torreblanca who has no plans for his book to be published in another language, though his publisher was quite enthusiastic about the idea he himself is convinced that there is not enough demand in the English speaking world...

The upshot of this is that if enough people mail Paco and let him know there is a demand he just might change his mind....For interested parties.....www.pacotorreblanca.com :cool:

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xdrixn   

All joking aside I would not suggest learning Russian. I want this torreblanca book as much as everyone else here and just visited www.pacotorreblanca.com to say "hey, I'd buy this book." Whle my first language is spanish I've been americanized by the school system which is to say I can barely read spanish so I can sympathize with those who can't at all. I also have an idea of publishing costs. Just to play devil's advocate here, How many people do you think will buy this book in ths US alone? 200? Two weeks ago I purchase the Alain Ducasse Desserts book and I regret it when I should have purchased the Torreblanca book which I will do next week while I brush up on my spanish. I noticed artisianbaker was kind enough to share his thoughts on the book, I'll do the same.

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I realize that publishing costs are very high, especially for a high end book with lots of photos and nice bindery, but how about the option they took for the Emmanuel Ryon Ice Cream book? They just created a separate paperbound volume with the english translation of the text that you purchase along with the original version that contains all the photos and such. Much less cost and risk that way, and although it's a bit more work to match the text with the photo, it would be far, far more useful than no translation at all. Hell, they can just xerox the damn thing as long as it's in english!

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Drewman   

I agree 100% with Nightscotsman. I just bought the Emmanuel Ryon Book and I'm perfectly happy with the separate English booklet.

I have 2 questions for xdrixn; Is the Ducasse book in English yet & why did you say you regret buying it?

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xdrixn   

The ducasse book is in french which is worse than my spanish. I'm in a bit of a rut and was looking for some inspiration despite me saying I've bought my last french book for a while. While it's encyclopedic in nature with tons of recipes it's not much I haven't seen before. Perhaps I should have refrained from making that statement as I have only had it for 2 weeks. I do think it has certain reference value. I'll give you an update down the road.

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Drewman   

I just got Philippe Conticini's "Tentations" book and have been going to Babelfish to translate the French I don't know.

BTW - Very cool and less than $50.

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Drewman   

Beautiful book. Plan to leave it on your coffee table as it's so tall (16") it won't fit on any book shelf and that's OK cuz the pix are great, recipes on the left page with photo on the full right page. It starts with finger food and apps, then goes into salads, entrees & desserts. The dessert section starts on page 90 & goes through 152 so it's 1/3 dessert stuff. A lot of things in small glasses, with great visual appeal. I just got it 2 days ago from Amazon France and haven't had the chance to make anything yet.

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tan319   

Conticini is awesome stuff!

When I had access to the Ducasse/Roberts book I loved it.

If I had a loose 'g'note it would go to the Ducasse/Roberts book/Torreblanca/Angelo Corvitto 'Los Secretos de Helados'.

That would take care of most of it.

BTW: I called Kitchen Arts & Letters the other day and the Torreblanca book came up and it's hard to get even in Spanish at the moment from what I gather.

My only complaint about the Ducasse book is that I have a fair bit of it in my SPOON ltd book.

Still, it's a great addition to any pastry chefs library, just for the flavor profiles and ideas.

I would LOVE to have it.

My birthday is

3/19 :biggrin::laugh::biggrin::laugh::laugh::laugh:

Oh, don't know if this is bummy but JBPrince is selling the 'Tentations' book for 33 bucks, think it's the same edition.

Can't wait to hear more about the Torreblancas book!

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xdrixn   
Oh, don't know if this is bummy but JBPrince is selling the 'Tentations' book for 33 bucks, think it's the same edition.

hmmm? there website says $47?


Edited by xdrixn (log)

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tan319   

Threw in my email grovel for an English translation too...

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tan319   

And indeed it does!

Got it mixed up with the 33.25 euros at Amazon.fr

Where for an extra 36 euro and some change you can get that Gerard Mulot book.

Another "would like to have " for me.

T

Oh, don't know if this is bummy but JBPrince is selling the 'Tentations' book for 33 bucks, think it's the same edition.

hmmm? there website says $47?

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In the event an English translation of the Torreblanca book isn't forthcoming I'd like to add my two cents about buying the Spanish edition. About two years ago I attended school in Italy. Everything was in Italian...the lectures, the recipes, you name it. (Although I know our Chefs understood English...you could tell by the smirks on their faces whenever someone cracked a particularly good joke in English.) I spoke not one word of Italian, yet I did just fine.

As already pointed out, the list of ingredients we tend to use is fairly repetitive, so you get to know the names of them very quickly. And by virtue of simultaneous translation I was able to take notes on all the methods to make sense of all instructions. I can now "read" most Italian recipes and muddle through them pretty well. And when I can't, a quick trip to a phrase translation book (or a phone call to my fluent friend) does the trick. Depending upon where you live, you can't swing a dead cat without hitting someone who speaks fluent Spanish. Sitting down with them and translating some sample recipes would take an afternoon's worth of work, and would probably be enough to allow you to work your way through most recipes in the book.

There are so many fantastic recipes that never find themselves translated into English. I've never seen anything like the ones I worked with in Italy and I treasure them. Look at it this way...what's the worst that could happen? You make a mistake in a recipe because of improper translation and learn from it, or you make a mistake and create something wonderfully new. Just my thoughts.

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tan319   

I wrote the guys at Torreblancas website last week and received this, this morning...

"Dear Ted:

The book translated into the English will be put to sale at the end of

March of this year. Anyway in our web page it will be announced.

Best regards.

Luis Rico

Pastelería Totel, S.L."

Not sure what that's all about but there you go!

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Just wanted to post - in case you missed it over in the PH 10 thread - that the English/Spanish version of the Torreblanca book is now available. I ordered it from Derecoquinaria here. 150 euros.

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My Spanish/English book arrived today - yay! Some first impressions:

- It's beautifully photographed, of course. Large and substantial.

- It comes with a separate, smaller, paperback volume with all the recipes (also in Spanish and English) and black and white construction diagrams. It's printed on what appears to be plastic coated, water resistant paper for use in the kitchen. Very cool.

- Chapters cover cakes/entremets, plated desserts, chocolates and bonbons, ice creams and sorbets, pate de fruits, decorative garnishes, sugar showpieces, beverages.

- Ice creams appear to be designed for the Paco Jet, though I assume you can process with a more traditional machine as well.

- English translations seem to be clearly written, though I've notices a few ingredients I'm not sure about (tiger nut milk?).

- Lots of step by step photos, especially in the cakes section.

- There are directions for turning some of the plated desserts into full-size cakes.

Overall - great stuff. Similar in scope to the Frederic Bau book. Worth the purchace for professionals.

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tan319   

Sounds exciting, Neil!

Did it set you back close to to 2?

Re: Tiger nuts... I think these are also called Chupa nuts.

Tiger nut milk is how the Spanish ( I believe) prepare horchata

I understand he pate de frui recipes are special, and that the pecttin used may be pectin NH?

Keep us informed of your impressions as the book unfolds!

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With the exchange rate the price came to about $185, not including shipping. 2nd day air was actually the cheaper delivery option, so shipping was very fast via DHL.

Yes, he uses pectin NH in a lot of recipes, as well as agar agar in some of the dairy and coconut based gels.

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