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Spaetzle tips


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My wife gave me a spatzle maker for Christmas this year. She loves these little noodles so I guess it si a hint to try making them at home. So what are the things I should watch out for in making them? Do you have any flavorings that you like to add? Can they be frozen (after cooking or before)?

Thanks

Dan

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My wife gave me a spatzle maker for Christmas this year. She loves these little noodles so I guess it si a hint to try making them at home. So what are the things I should watch out for in making them? Do you have any flavorings that you like to add? Can they be frozen (after cooking or before)?

Thanks

Dan

I've never used a spaetzle maker, but i love those little buggers! One thing I always have to watch out for is making them too big so they get a little tough, but I think with the maker that wouldn't be a problem. I always just drip them from a spoon. Anyhow, as for flavorings go, I always put nutmeg in there, but I've been thinking lately that I might want to put a little mustard powder (or if they are dryer, a little prepared mustard) maybe just to give them a little deepness. The other thing I do is cook them in stock, and then use a little bit of the stock to moisten them when i fry them with butter and breadcrumbs.

Oh man, I know what I am making with dinner tonight.

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Man I make these a lot and in quantity for several meals. Very finely chopped herbs - chives, parsley, scallion work well and I always add a big dash of nutmeg.

When working in batches, drop the completed spaetzle in ice water while cooking subsequent batches. They are less sticky that way. I usually just reheat in micro not saute in more butter as often recommended.

They freeze beautifully.

With the maker it is unbelievably easy to whip up a batch. I have found that spraying the gadget thoroughly on every surface with pan spray saves a lot in clean up.

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I had buckwheat spaetzle at a german restaurant last month. Wonderful depth of flavor from the buckwheat, but the greyish color of the buckwheat does make them look kind of like brains on the plate - fine for those of us who can channel our inner 6 year old :biggrin:, not so good for the squeamish...

Do you suffer from Acute Culinary Syndrome? Maybe it's time to get help...

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Thanks for everyones help. I made my first batch tonight and they came out OK. A little too much nutmeg and some size variations, but they still tasted OK.

I was wondering how to keep the size variation to a minimum. This batch seemed to have some really small ones, about the size of a chocolate cip and some longer ones, between 1/2 and 3/4 inch. My guess is that the motion of the basket needs to be more uniform.

Any recomendations on coloring the noodles? One local restaurant serves spinach spaetzle. I'm not sure that this is done the same way as spinach pasta since there is less mixing and needing involved.

Dan

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The big key here is to not over-work your dough and activate the gluten, this toughens the batter and makes your spatzle more chewy. As for color and flavor, you can try adding in chopped herbs. Parlsey is nice and imagine tarragon would work very nicely as well. The spinach idea is nice and I would image you could make a coulis of types with the spinach and add this to your batter, just be shure to decrease your liquid accordingly. The shape is the speed in which you move the basket over the slots, keep it constant and it should improve your uniformity. Hope this helps!!

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Mustard — either Dijon or whole-grain or both — works as a flavouring, especially when the spaetzle are to be served with beef or lamb. Just add some along with the other liquids when you make the dough. Ditto chèvre frais, the fluffy fresh goat cheese, which adds a subtle tang. You can also flavour the dough with finely chopped herbs; try a chive and chèvre frais combination. Mmmmm.

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  • 3 years later...

Yesterday I had some spaetzle at a German restaurant. I hadn't had them in awhile and forgotten how tasty spaetzle can be. Googled a couple recipes, they seem pretty simple to make, so I'm going to try my hand at them in the next little while (there's a Tyler Florence recipe I'm eyeing).

Other than sauteeing spaetzle in butter as a side dish, what else can I do with them? Are they ever eaten as an entree, like pasta? What sauces I can serve them with? Anyone have a killer spaetzle recipe? Thanks for any suggestions!

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I love spatzle!!!! I grew up on the very traditional style but have since learned to use them in many different ways. I don't use a spatzle maker, but instead use the cutting board and oiled knife method. mcattaneo23 Brought up the most important point of not over mixing. And for adding flavorings or colors you are just limited by you imagination.

My personal favorite use is to use them in Asian inspired cooking. The last thing I made was a coconut curry soup with chicken. I made the spatzle and flavored them with Siracha and cooked them in the soup. I have also made the same soup and made them with Thai basil. I also like to put them in different stir fry combinations. These are just a few of the things that I put them in

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I don't make them very often, but if you make a whole bunch they will freeze just nicely once they're cooked, though I usually just make up the amount I need, it's so quick. Don't know if the dough would freeze well, it's so liquid.

I never add any taste modifiers to them, I like them "original".

As for sauces etc, I've not seen them served as a "pasta dish" except as Kase Spatzle, with a nice thick gooey string pulling cheese sauce (mostly just melted cheese and sauteed onions) which is delicious on a cold winter day in Austria! Other than that they work well as a side dish with beef/pork/venison with a nice thick pan sauce.

Hmmm, might just have to make some this weekend, I haven't thought about them in a long time - thanks for the reminder!

"And don't forget music - music in the kitchen is an essential ingredient!"

- Thomas Keller

Diablo Kitchen, my food blog

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I don't make them very often, but if you make a whole bunch they will freeze just nicely once they're cooked, though I usually just make up the amount I need, it's so quick. Don't know if the dough would freeze well, it's so liquid.

I never add any taste modifiers to them, I like them "original".

As for sauces etc, I've not seen them served as a "pasta dish" except as Kase Spatzle, with a nice thick gooey string pulling cheese sauce (mostly just melted cheese and sauteed onions) which is delicious on a cold winter day in Austria! Other than that they work well as a side dish with beef/pork/venison with a nice thick pan sauce.

Hmmm, might just have to make some this weekend, I haven't thought about them in a long time - thanks for the reminder!

Must have crispy bacon on top too :wub:

tracey

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Serving ideas:

1. Plain melted or browned butter is all you need for a "sauce". Crumbs are nice, also, although I like it served with sauce or gravy from the main dish, if there is any. A must for paprikash.

2. For spinach spaetzle, add the spinach to the pot rather than the dough. Chiffonade of spinach or whole baby spinach leaves may be added to the cooking water for the last minute or two of cooking the spaetzle.

3. Combine cooked spaetzle with sauteed baby vegetables at the last minute. This is a nice vegetarian entree, although it needs some protein added.

4. Add to soup in place of other starches. It holds up perfectly and won't absorb more moisture or change texture in the freezer.

Chill the spaetzle and keep refrigerated in a container or plastic bag. When ready to serve, reheat in butter as needed. You won't need the freezer, you'll eat it all before it even thinks of going bad. Making a larger quantity would just get another pot dirty, as the pot will only hold so much before the dough starts piling up in a big lump, and the dough usually starts to cook on the metal surface of the spaetzle maker before I am finished.

If too much liquid is added to the dough, the spaetzle may get mushy and disintegrate in the water. I find the texture is much better combined with a fork, adding eggs first, and letting the dough rest in refrigerator. (Although I have been known to make it in the food processor.) Salt the cooking water well.

Can you tell I like spaetzle?

Ruth Dondanville aka "ruthcooks"

“Are you making a statement, or are you making dinner?” Mario Batali

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Nice use for leftover spaetzle:

Sautee in some butter and then scramble some eggs in with the noodles. Season with salt and pepper and add in some chopped ham towards the end. Serve with a green salad dressed with a simple vinaigrette.

I made some spaetzle and had some left over; not enough for a side dish on their own. I mixed them into some butter green beans for a side dish.

"Under the dusty almond trees, ... stalls were set up which sold banana liquor, rolls, blood puddings, chopped fried meat, meat pies, sausage, yucca breads, crullers, buns, corn breads, puff pastes, longanizas, tripes, coconut nougats, rum toddies, along with all sorts of trifles, gewgaws, trinkets, and knickknacks, and cockfights and lottery tickets."

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For quite a while, Roland foodservice ran a full page add in Food arts for a mustard spaetzle that made it's way into my recipe file. Unfortunately (not for me) im doing a stage in Italy and had no need for a spaetzle recipe, so I can't help you out. Maybe someone on here has a subscription or roland's website.

Called for whole grain and dijon (presumably so you buy both of their productsi), sour cream as well as rosemary and chive.

As stated, not overworking gluten is key as is having a the biggest pot you can find. It's always good to keep the water at a constant temp which means you want the most volume of water possible.

good luck

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