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Italian Bread in Buenos Aires


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:biggrin: Buenos Aires is populated by millions of descendents of Italian immigrants. Nonetheless, most bakeries sell a pasty, tasteless bread and in some cases an absolutely insipid bread baked in electric ovens.

The great exception is La Pompeya at Ave. Independencia 1912 (w/ Combate de los Pozos). This is a great find that I learned about years ago on Canal Gourmet. Founded in the early 1930, Italian immigrants are said to have gotten off the boat in Buenos Aires with little more than slips of paper with the address of the bakery. Now, as then, the place is well worth the trip to find it. This bakery has nothing to do with the Italian pastry shops that dot the lower east side of Manhattan. La Pompeya is as working class as the neighborhood it is situated in. The bread I go for is the round kilo loaf of country bread. It is crusty and made for bruschetta. Don't be put off by the dark salesroom. There are all sorts of surprises to be discovered and tasted: canoli shells, pan dulce for the holidays, flaky sfogattielle, and fresas, large round donuts of dried bread, which I have never tried, but are for moistening with olive oil to make a poor man's bread salad.

It's a two hour round trip for me to La Pompeya but I am always a happy camper those Saturdays that I make the trip. The country bread freezes perfectly.

Pizzaboy

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:biggrin: Buenos Aires is populated by millions of descendents of Italian immigrants.  Nonetheless, most bakeries sell a pasty, tasteless bread and in some cases an absolutely insipid bread baked in electric ovens.

The great exception is La Pompeya at Ave. Independencia 1912 (w/ Combate de los Pozos).  This is a great find that I learned about years ago on Canal Gourmet.  Founded in the early 1930, Italian immigrants are said to have gotten off the boat in Buenos Aires with little more than slips of paper with the address of the bakery.  Now, as then, the place is well worth the trip to find it.  This bakery has nothing to do with the Italian pastry shops that dot the lower east side of Manhattan. La Pompeya is as working class as the neighborhood it is situated in.  The bread I go for is the round kilo loaf of country bread.  It is crusty and made for bruschetta.  Don't be put off by the dark salesroom.  There are all sorts of surprises to be discovered and tasted: canoli shells, pan dulce for the holidays, flaky sfogattielle,  and fresas, large round donuts of dried bread, which I have never tried, but are for moistening with olive oil to make a poor man's bread salad.

It's a two hour round trip for me to La Pompeya but I am always a happy camper those Saturdays that I make the trip.  The country bread freezes perfectly.

I have put this on my list of places to visit in February. Thanks!

Patti Davis

www.anatomyofadinnerparty.com

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the resons lies behind that most breadmakers are Spanish and not Italians they have inherited the business but not many know how to make true Italian bread. However that does not mean that Italian bread is the only good bread there are many others good and I have no doubt BA has good bakers around

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Thanks for the tip. I paid a visit today and this place is a good resource. I got a half-kilo loaf of the country bread and it's definitely a step above the endless sea of mediocre mignones.

I also noticed they had some good-looking biscotti. I almost got some but wanted an excuse to go back, so I left them for next time.

I would still love to find a bakery that produces a baguette in the style of, say, Fairway in NYC, the Red Hen Bakery in Chicago or La Brea Bakery in L.A. (and now beyond). I am not holding up any of these breads as the ultimate, but they're definitely representative of a type of bread I have yet to see here.

Any tips on this would be most appreciated.

Meanwhile, let me pass along the info for another source for pan de campo: El Pequeño Mercado on Vera at Julián Álvarez (along with Masamadre es con M and Providencia) sells a good pan de campo that is similar to the one sold at La Pompeya. The bread is not made on site. It's made at either Providencia (Cabrera 5995) or Masamadre (Olleros 3891), both unpretenscious places worth a visit in their own right.

El Pequeño Mercado also has a very small selection of olive oil, cheese and wine.

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  • 4 months later...

For quality bread, I would recommend HausBrot. OK, its more German/Austrian style but Im very pleased with their quality.

Visit Argentina and try wines from the RIGHT side of the Andes !!!

www.terroir.com.ar

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  • 1 month later...

:biggrin: HausBrot is, indeed, my source for daily whole wheat loaves. It is good stuff and a lot healthier than eating the usual panaderia white flour. Still, La Pompeya is the place I want to be. If only it were closer to my house....I've yet to try the Tiramisu and various other goodies.

Also around the corner, one block parallell towards the Congress in the middle of the block, is a place that makes Italian cheeses right there in the back room. The ricotta is tasty....

Pizzaboy

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And where might one find HausBrot?

La Pompeya, btw, was a great suggestion. But, like for Robert, it's too far away to go for "daily bread".

SaltShaker - Casting a little flavor (and a few aspersions) on the world of food, drink, and life

Casa SaltShaker - Restaurant de Puertas Cerradas

Spanish-English-Spanish Food & Wine Dictionary - a must for any traveler!

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Tried the bread at Masamadre es con M the other day - they have a whole grain and seed bread that's simply spectacular! And their other breads that I sampled are darned good as well. Thanks Daniel for the recommendation!

Edited by saltshaker (log)

SaltShaker - Casting a little flavor (and a few aspersions) on the world of food, drink, and life

Casa SaltShaker - Restaurant de Puertas Cerradas

Spanish-English-Spanish Food & Wine Dictionary - a must for any traveler!

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Hausbrot has a number of locations, usually close to Jumbo supermarkets. The arcade at the Jumbo palermo has one branch, right in front of the vet.

Visit Argentina and try wines from the RIGHT side of the Andes !!!

www.terroir.com.ar

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  • 5 months later...
Hausbrot has a number of locations, usually close to Jumbo supermarkets.  The arcade at the Jumbo palermo has one branch, right in front of the vet.

Hausbrot sales spots are scattered around. I am always discovering them. The central bakery is in San Isidro. Otherwise, a listing can be found at http://www.hausbrot.com.ar/.

Other great bread is served in the bread basket at Thymus. It includes a superb raisin nut bread. The food at the place is great, too.

Pizzaboy

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