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jeroen_kb

What are my copper pans lined with?

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Hi everybody,

This Xmas I was looking around at my parents basement and found a set of copper pans (see picture)

I managed to persuade my parents that it would be better if I used them instead of being neglected, so now I have those pans. My parents told me they bought them about 30 years ago.

My main question is what the lining is made of: tin, stainless steel or something else ? So I know for what to use it (and for what not)

Searching the internet didn't help. The bottom of the pans read the following: Georg Jensen design, Denmark and the letters HK in an oval.

Any info is appreciated !!!

Jeroen

gallery_17221_2287_1525977.jpg

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They look great.

One of my regrets was when my wife and I were in Athens, we went to a store that specializes in copper cookware (in the market area). We had actually gotten lost and we happen on this area. But they were selling a set up pots and pans for about $100 US. Only reason I didn't buy was that I didn't want to lug them around greece. A big regret because stuff we did end up mailing back to the us, including glass and stone all got here without breakage.

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Thanks for those pictures. By the looks of it it's tin lined. Although the pans have a yellowish brownish glow over them (for a lack of better word)

I did cook with them today and it's great !! perfect even heat all throughout the pan and not just the center!!!

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They are definitely tin-lined pans. Several stores in the town of Solvang used to carry the HK line of kitchen ware including sets of copper pans and beautiful chafing dishes.

Be sure to use only wood or silicone utensils in the pans to avoid scratching the tin lining. Also, do not place empty pans over a burner on high heat. If properly cared for, the tin lining should last for years and re-tinning is very expensive.


"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett

 

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andiesenji, thanks for that information. Now I know I should be carefull with them. I wouldn't be surprised if it was even impossible to get them retinned in Holland so only low heat form now on.

M.X.Hasset, thanks for the link ! Very usefull

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Unless you've cleaned them, they are remarkably shiny for tin. Some stainless lined pans are shiny. http://www.cuisine-french.com/cgi/mdc/l/en...ivre/index.html

They may be silver lined. Some pans for dining room chafing dish work and decorative use were silver plated inside. Real luxury! Also the copper wall looks a little thin for working kitchen pans

In any case (tin or silver) treat the lining like a non-stick coating. Its fragile. No metal spoons, or abrasive scourers.

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I did a number of searches for 'Georg Jensen" with various criteria (1975, pans, copper, etc...) and most of the results are for jewelry, flatware, and decorative serving pieces. So they may be silver lined, and there is the possibility that they may be for decorative use. Not very usefull I know, but maybe it will help you along.

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i'm almost certain they must be silver lined. copper pans from georg jensen are seen on danish on line-auctions from time to time, and are without exception silver lined. which is to be expected from georg jensen, a major danish siver ware manufacturer.

pretty, but probably very fragile, as mentioned by jackal10.


christianh@geol.ku.dk. just in case.

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Jackal_10: I did clean the little sauce pan, because it was almost black inside. But fortunatly not with a scrub pad or anything like that. And the pans are about a millimeter thick so in that sense they are probably just for show or dining room chafing.

And M.X.Hassett and oraklet thanks for the info on the possibility that it's silver lined. If that's true it raises the question if I should use them at all ? Or would that be wrecking some expensive pans?

Thanks again for all the info. I hope I'll be able to use them, if carefully, because they are great (IMHO)

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Jackal_10: I did clean the little sauce pan, because it was almost black inside. But fortunatly not with a scrub pad or anything like that. And the pans are about a millimeter thick so in that sense they are probably just for show or dining room chafing.

And M.X.Hassett and oraklet thanks for the info on the possibility that it's silver lined. If that's true it raises the question if I should use them at all ? Or would that be wrecking some expensive pans?

Thanks again for all the info. I hope I'll be able to use them, if carefully, because they are great (IMHO)

oh well, personally, i'd give them to to someone who cares more about pretty serving vessels than i do. i don't think they'll be of any use for actual cooking :sad:


christianh@geol.ku.dk. just in case.

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With a thickness of 1mm I would say that these would not make the best cooking vessel. Nor do I beleive that was there intended function. Put them on e-bay and then buy yourself a FALK


Edited by M.X.Hassett (log)

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Well, if they make a nice bundle it would be a good choice to sell them I guess. I want to cook with them; not look at them. Too bad :sad:

Just one more question: what's the reason that a thin copper pan isn't any good for cooking? Can't it retain enough heat or someting else

thank you

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Some googling http://cgi.ebay.com/GEORG-JENSEN-big-saute...1QQcmdZViewItem indicates the HK stands for Henning Koppel, one of Georg Jensens chief designers,

Personally I love using silver lined pans. I hate stainless lined pans - you lose much of the advantages of the high conductivity of the copper. Most copper pans are 2-3mm thick, and very heavy to use. Use them carefully for special things, like omelettes.

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jackal10: thanks for the ebay link. Now I can find out a rough marketvalue for the pans. Maybe based on that outcome I can decide what to do.

Altough I would prefer to keep and use them if that'sm possible with 1 mm copper pans.

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Just one more question: what's the reason that a thin copper pan isn't any good for cooking? Can't it retain enough heat or someting else

thank you

that, and the fact that 1 mm is so thin that you're sure to have hot spots. personally i find that 2 mm is all right for saute pans, but sauce pans or frying pans should be as thick as possible.

i must say that i see tin or silver lining as a thing of the past as it's terribly fragile. the stainless lining used on modern copper pans is supposedly so thin that it doesn't really influence temperature control. "supposedly", as i haven't used tin lined pans - but i'm quite happy with the amazing reactivity of my stainless lined pans :smile:

besides, it can be quite difficult to find someone who'll do the tin or silver relining for you when it's worn out.


christianh@geol.ku.dk. just in case.

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oraklet.

I guess you're right about the fragility of the pans.

I can see me using them for some cooking that doesn't require a lot of heat (I tried it yesterday and I did notice a very even cooking throughout the pan) or even presenting the food in at the table. it sounds nice: silverlined copper pans :smile:

But it might be tempting to sell if it fetches a nice sum on ebay and get some real copper cooking pans :laugh:

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