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Cured pork loin, prawns, blood orange


bunny
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I think it sounds Portugese or Italian...but needs something fattier like pork belly to counter the sweetness of the blood orange

I would certainly eat it though :smile:

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If your prawns are big enough, how about taking wafer thin slices of the loin and wrapping them around the shellfish and sauteing them - a sort of weird riff on bacon wrapped scallops. You could serve them with a salad made from the orange segments and mache and a vinigrette flavoured with some of the blood orange juice. I think that could be worth experimenting with. Otherwise serve a prawn and orange combo first then do something else with the cured loin.

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Well go on then, don't just stand there sniping.

Well, okay then.

Juice a couple of blood oranges, reserving the carcasses as serving bowls. Reduce the juice by half and let cool; use it to make a vinaigrette with some olive oil, balsamic vinegar, salt and pepper.

Toss some microsalad with some of the vinaigrette.

Mix the prawns with little bit of olive oil, cayenne pepper and fleur de sel. Sear on high heat. Assemble the prawns in the orange carcasses, top with microsalad and drizzle the remaining vinaigrette around.

The pork loin would probable make a nice sandwich.

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This is fun reading. I'll give it a go.

Blood orange sweet and sour prawns.

Blood orange juice, brown sugar, vinegar, garlic, ginger, worcester sauce or whatever backbone you choose. . . does that cured pork belong in there too?

Reminds me of a dish from Jack's Luxury Oyster Bar in NYC, now defuct I think. Langoustine and pork belly in very light pork broth, served in a covered Staub Pot. The belly was tasty but kind of blew away the langoustine. But this makes me wonder about a shellfish stock with the shrimp shells, and maybe that's where the pork comes in. Adds a little smokiness--how's it cured? just salt or salt and smoke? Then you've got prawns in smoky shellfish foam. . . no blood orange.

I might be the third to motion that these three in one place equals a mess. It's two proteins and an unwieldy sweet/acid.

Best of luck. This could be a fantastic ongoing thread parsing and synthesizing difficult triads of ingredients.

Example:

Romaine lettuce

sweetbreads

canteloupe

You shouldn't eat grouse and woodcock, venison, a quail and dove pate, abalone and oysters, caviar, calf sweetbreads, kidneys, liver, and ducks all during the same week with several cases of wine. That's a health tip.

Jim Harrison from "Off to the Side"

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I might be the third to motion that these three in one place equals a mess.  It's two proteins and an unwieldy sweet/acid.

[snip!]

Best of luck.  This could be a fantastic ongoing thread parsing and synthesizing difficult triads of ingredients.

Example:

Romaine lettuce

sweetbreads

canteloupe

It is the fact that the pork loin is cured (not smoked) that is throwing me off. If it were fresh, I might think of using the blood orange to glaze it while cooking.

As for the latter, you could pan-fry the sweetbreads and serve with braised romaine while using the canteloupe for either a palate-cleansing granité or as a sweet ingredient for an espume to serve with the sweetbreads.

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As for the latter, you could pan-fry the sweetbreads and serve with braised romaine while using the canteloupe  for either a palate-cleansing granité or as a sweet ingredient for an espume to serve with the sweetbreads.

Sounds delicious. What's an espume?

You shouldn't eat grouse and woodcock, venison, a quail and dove pate, abalone and oysters, caviar, calf sweetbreads, kidneys, liver, and ducks all during the same week with several cases of wine. That's a health tip.

Jim Harrison from "Off to the Side"

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aha

You shouldn't eat grouse and woodcock, venison, a quail and dove pate, abalone and oysters, caviar, calf sweetbreads, kidneys, liver, and ducks all during the same week with several cases of wine. That's a health tip.

Jim Harrison from "Off to the Side"

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