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chocolate cookie crumb pie crusts


phlawless
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I was flipping through RLB Pie and Pastry Bible and her recommendation is to NOT blind bake a choco cookie crust; she says it will lose it's chocolatey flavor.

I don't make a lot of these kinds of crusts, and I was wondering what others' experiences are. I have always blind baked, but when I do I am usually disappointed with how lacking in flavor the choco crumbs are. Could this be the answer?

"Godspeed all the bakers at dawn... may they all cut their thumbs and bleed into their buns til they melt away..."

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I think the need for blind baking (or partial baking) depends on what your filling will be. However, I don't think you loose anything in blind baking a chocolate crumb crust made with good-quality chocolate wafers. You could mix in a little extra cocoa powder or vanilla or melted white chocolate (replacing part of the butter). I usually make my chocolate (or nonchocolate) cookie crusts from chocolate or almond biscotti that I have left over.

He who distinguishes the true savor of his food can never be a glutton; he who does not cannot be otherwise. --- Henry David Thoreau
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I don't blind bake any graham crust (chocolate or regular). Just mix in some butter and sugar, and pack it down. They've never turned out soggy or anything for me.

I agree: mine aren't soggy either. However, I think Phlawless's question has to do with the possible loss of flavor with blind baking. I don't notice it. Sometimes, I blind bake because either I pre-cook the filling on top of the stove or I use a custard or uncooked filling (one of my favorites is a key lime pie that's uncooked, and chilled in a prebaked chocolate cookie crust). Sometimes I use a blind-baked cookie crust for a pastry cream + fresh fruit top, which is unbaked.

He who distinguishes the true savor of his food can never be a glutton; he who does not cannot be otherwise. --- Henry David Thoreau
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I like to bake all my crumb crusts for just a few minutes (5 at the most) -- I find it gives a more complex, toasted flavor to the crust. I've never noticed chocolate crumb crusts tasting less intense after baking. I use Famous Chocolate Wafers for my crumb crusts.

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I ended up not blind baking the crust...it tasted great, though it was a bit crumbly around the edge; i could have taken them a bit too far, however. Thanks to all!

"Godspeed all the bakers at dawn... may they all cut their thumbs and bleed into their buns til they melt away..."

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It doesn't make any sense to me to blind-bake crusts made from crushed cookies/biscuits etc that do not have a raising agent like yeast or baking powder.

It's going to be remain flat anyway, so why bother?

I never blind bake my cookie crusts either.

If the pie won't be baked, then I always blind bake the crust. Unbaked, the crumb crust is too crumbly. I also think the baking imparts a better flavor and texture. Otherwise, it's like spreading butter and sugar on a cookie.

He who distinguishes the true savor of his food can never be a glutton; he who does not cannot be otherwise. --- Henry David Thoreau
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I agree. I like to blind bake my crumb crusts for unbaked fillings. The heat melts the sugar which acts more like a glue for the crumbs, and I think it holds them together better. IMHO.

Eileen

Eileen Talanian

HowThe Cookie Crumbles.com

HomemadeGourmetMarshmallows.com

As for butter versus margarine, I trust cows more than chemists. ~Joan Gussow

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JayBassin, I don't mean DON'T bake the crust. I do bake mine, I just don't blindbake them.

I think they taste better that way.

I think we agree that cookie crusts should be baked. My point (which I guess I didn't make clear) was that I blind bake only when I don't bake the pie with the filling. For example, when I fill a pre-baked shell with a pastry cream or fruit, or pre-cooked filling.

I also partially blind bake a cookie crust when I want to add a chocolate layer or coating on top of the crust and under the filling.

He who distinguishes the true savor of his food can never be a glutton; he who does not cannot be otherwise. --- Henry David Thoreau
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