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Whole Duck ideas


cacao
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Hi folks:

I am a 'recovering vegetarian' who used to love to eat duck - something like 20 years ago. My significant other loves duck, and so, as cooking is love to me, I've decided to try roasting a whole duck for Xmas eve dinner for my sweetie and I. Since it's been a long time for me, I want to make as greaseless a duck as I can, so I will be able to enjoy and digest it, after all these years!

I'm hoping to find a good recipe, perhaps in the 'Peking style' of cooking (as in steaming or boiling the duck before roasting) , but with perhaps Frenchified/Westernized seasoning. Any advice or favorite recipes out there? I saw something on epicurious with a fig and mushroom sauce that looked interesting... any other ideas?

Thanks much,

Cacao

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On Thanksgiving I did a twice-cooked duck. Steamed for about 40 minutes in some water with aromatics. Then roasted for about an hour at 425 (I think). I glazed it with a pomegranate, honey, and soy thing. It was a kind of a trite presentation (not exactly cutting edge) but very tasty all the same. I suggest some sort of sweet and salty glaze to baste the duck with when it's roasting.

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I just did a duck stuffed with red rice and andouille sausage.. Just took the cleaned the inside out.. Tucked the kneck skin inside and sewed shut the other end.. Baked it at a low 325 and when the internal temp hit 175 I put the heat up and crisped the duck...

What better way to get back into the swing with a meat stuffed duck!

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I did a "peking-style" duck a few years back which involved par-boiling the whole bird in a mixture of water, soy sauce, star anise, ginger and garlic for about 10-15 minutes to render some of the fat, then letting it air-dry overnight to crisp up the skin. Then you roast it as you would western-style. You get the succulent meat and the crispy skin, without having to install a whole Chinese kitchen.

I also have a "Stewed Chinese Duck" recipe from the Bangkok Post if you're interested...

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I made Steven Raichlen's Duckling La'Orange from his Beer Can Chicken book and it was the best preparation of duck I have had outside of a few restaurants. The skin was crispy, the meat was juicy and had the right amount of orange flavor. The Apricot Orange Sauce was the perfect accompiament. You basically are roasting the duck upright on a beer can on a grill. If you don't have a grill or don;t like grilling in the winter you could easily use the same technique in the oven.

You end up taking a "tall boy" beer can filling it with beer and orange soda. The steam from this mixture keeps the duck moist while the heat from the grill prefectly crisps the skin. You need to poke holes in the skin before you cook it and about 45 minutes into the cooking time. The result is a perfectly cooked duck with a crisy skin.

I will likely try other preperations using the same technique. You could easily experiment with various rubs, marinades, and beer can ingredients.

The recipe is available for free on his website:

http://www.barbecuebible.com/featured/reci...ling_a_lora.php

Edited by repoman (log)

Explore the food, beverages, and people of Wisconsin EatWisconsin.com

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German style is my favourite. Stuffed with fresh tart apple bits (one apple) and dried fruits, figs, prunes ... whatever, onion, garlic. Salt, pepper inside and everywhere, sage, thyme inside too. Sew it up, poke the crap out of the skin. 325 for 1.25 - 1.75 hours draining the fat every now and then.

Very delicious. Very easy.

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I did a "peking-style" duck a few years back which involved par-boiling the whole bird in a mixture of water, soy sauce, star anise, ginger and garlic for about 10-15 minutes to render some of the fat, then letting it air-dry overnight to crisp up the skin.  Then you roast it as you would western-style.  You get the succulent meat and the crispy skin, without having to install a whole Chinese kitchen. 

We used a method similar to this, but boiled the duck longer, and instead of giving it a roasting took it out when cooked but still firm, and then smoked it over a combination of black tea leaves, rice and brown sugar.

Tealicious!

John

"Venite omnes qui stomacho laboratis et ego restaurabo vos"

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Thanks for the ideas, all,

Ok, I am definitely planning the Peking duck style cooking process of steaming and then roasting. I'm inclined to try stuffing some aromatics into the duck during steaming, and then roasting with a basting of pomegranate /soy/honey ( that combo sounds good to me).

For those in the know, methinks I've got myself a Liberty Duck on order :)

The smoked duck sounds terrific... I need to get me a smoker one of these days!

I'll let you know how Xmas dinner turns out!

-Cacao

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Thanks for the ideas, all,

The smoked duck sounds terrific... I need to get me a smoker one of these days!

I used the stove-top method for smoking; use a pot large enough to hold your duck, and keep the bird off the bottom with a cake cooling rack. The mixture should be smouldering first, put a tight fitting lid on quickly, and keep over the lowest heat you can for about 1 hour. Maybe experiment with chicken first; they are delicious prepared this way also, and you'll be 'pro' when the time comes for smoked duck! The mixture ratio varies, but we used 2:2:1 rice, tea, sugar (by volume) Don't use your favourite stock pot or Dutch oven, as the burnt mixture is difficult to clean off afterwards.

John

"Venite omnes qui stomacho laboratis et ego restaurabo vos"

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  • 5 months later...

Hi guys, i have two whole ducks in the freezer since 2 months ago and dont know what to do with them, mainly because I never done a whole duck before.. just a few margets.

Anyone can recommend different ways and recipes for it?

Thanks

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I personally have not tried this recipe myself, but I have been meaning to for a while.

The Amazing Five-Hour Duck

Save your duck fat and render it out for the fat and cracklings Rendered Duck Fat

I recently bought myself James Peterson's The Duck Cookbook , if you love duck as much as I do, it is a very worthy purchasse. Peterson gives instructions on how to handle all manner of duck preperations, butchering as well as fantastic recipes.

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The most important thing - whatever you do with the basic duck - is to make duck stock with the bones. Cook it down, concentrate it and freeze it in small containers. Makes the best risotto (esp with porcini mushrooms), Asian-style noodle soups etc.

Happy Feasting

Janet (a.k.a The Old Foodie)

My Blog "The Old Foodie" gives you a short food history story each weekday day, always with a historic recipe, and sometimes a historic menu.

My email address is: theoldfoodie@fastmail.fm

Anything is bearable if you can make a story out of it. N. Scott Momaday

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I always found duck stock to be really greasy, and a pain to make. Just my opinion. I love duck, don't get me wrong, but even the bones seem to carry a large amount of fat and grease on them.

You could always fabricate the ducks, and braise the thighs and sear the breasts, then have duck 2 ways.

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Cool, thanks for the quick replies.

That 5 hours recipe seems too much... i was thinking something more like an hour recipe.

I think i'll grill it, like this. Maybe stuffed with something and a sweet or herbs dressing. Not really sure of nothing, have seen those recipes but dont know what to choose.

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I slow roasted one last week. . Skin was wonderfully crisp and the meat was melt in the mouth tender. Served it with an orange sauce. I cut the wings off prior to roasting and they were browned and used to make stock. I have a jar of duck fat in the fridge that I have been using to roast potatoes.

gallery_27944_2966_565863.jpg

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Nice pic Ann, i'll try to do something like that, a slow grill, droping some orange juice while doing it and serve it with some glazed carrot and onion in orange juice. Or something like that..

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i'm loving this thread coz i love duck. my method of cooking duck was strumbled upon because duck shrinks. half an hour to an hour before cooking, i rub about 1/4 a cup of salt all over the duck and its insides. the last time, i also sprinkled five spice powder in with the salt. leave the duck for 1/2 an hour in a pot in which the duck fits snugly. pour in enough water into the pot to cover the duck once the time has elapsed, and bring to the boil and simmer 15 minutes. leave the duck in the liquid until ready to crisp. remove the duck from the liquid and allow to drain off the liquid. preheat the oven to 200C/400F. place the duck on a rack, pierce the duck skin liberally so the the fat can drain and roast until golden turning halfway through.

i've found this minimalises shrinkage, allows the fat to drain and is nice and crisp.

must remember to look for duck next time i'm out....

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I always found duck stock to be really greasy, and a pain to make.

Easy solution to that one - let it chill, lift off the slab of beautiful duck fat (use for other purposes such as roasting potatoes ...).

It is worth it, honest!

Happy Feasting

Janet (a.k.a The Old Foodie)

My Blog "The Old Foodie" gives you a short food history story each weekday day, always with a historic recipe, and sometimes a historic menu.

My email address is: theoldfoodie@fastmail.fm

Anything is bearable if you can make a story out of it. N. Scott Momaday

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This wasn't simple, but it was delicious.

Duck galantine

Would you part with the recipe?

Happy Feasting

Janet (a.k.a The Old Foodie)

My Blog "The Old Foodie" gives you a short food history story each weekday day, always with a historic recipe, and sometimes a historic menu.

My email address is: theoldfoodie@fastmail.fm

Anything is bearable if you can make a story out of it. N. Scott Momaday

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No pictures but the last duck I did was close to the best ever. I did it "beer can chicken style" on the outdoor grill. I used indirect heat and by turning the duck such that the each leg got a good turn nearest the hot burner and the breast mostly turned away from it, I was able to achieve well-done legs and yet still kept the breast juicy.

Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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This wasn't simple, but it was delicious.

Duck galantine

Would you part with the recipe?

That would be a little tricky to do, as it's quite long and involved. It originally comes from a tremendous book I found in a second hand shop called Pates and Terrines. This has everything from simplest country pates, to liver mousses to an entire stuffed Boar's Head coverd in aspic (the picture of that is stunning)! Although the instructions for that particular recipe begin with the classic line (I paraphrase) that if you need to ask how to make this particular dish, you probably shouldn't be attempting it!

Anyway, it's a galantine of wild duck recipe covered in pistachios which I adapted to a nice small duckling that my butcher had. The farce is foie gras, duck breast, pork and back fat (very high quality gloucester old spot/tamworth mix) mixed in with pistachios, smoked tongue and ham. You should use some preserved truffles, but my wife is allergic to all mushrooms, so alas.

So, debone the duck. Cut out all the cartilage. Even up the meat. Make the farce. Stuff duck and carefully roll in roasting film or cheese cloth. Poach in a duck stock made with the bones from the duck (they say) for 45-50 minutes. I did it at a lower poaching temperature of approximately 60 C /140F for about 2 hours, until the internal temp was about 138, then let it cool in the poaching liquid for an hour or so, and placed it in the fridge.

The next day, unwrap, scrape off rendered fat, reduce and clarify the poaching stock to a glace. Cool that quickly over ice. Roll the duck in this almost gelling stock, and then roll in a tray of ground pistachios.

The galantine cuts differently at every location. Further up than the picture, the farce was in the center and surrounded by breast meat on all sides. The picture above shows where the breast meat goes into the thigh.

Edited by MobyP (log)

"Gimme a pig's foot, and a bottle of beer..." Bessie Smith

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"111,111,111 x 111,111,111 = 12,345,678,987,654,321" Bruce Frigard 'Winesonoma' - RIP

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