Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

Sign in to follow this  
CRUZMISL

Gourmet tea as a gift. Where to buy?

Recommended Posts

Hi All,

I'm an espresso freak but my wife loves tea, jasmine in particular. Are there any places online that sell tea that could be given as a gift, maybe packaged in a nice box or something?

Thanks for any advice?

Joe

PS They need to be in bags. Loose tea is not her thing:)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have bought teas from many online vendors.

Harney & Sons

and

Adagio teas are two of my favorites. The selection is first rate and the service is excellent.


"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks!

Anyone buy from this place?

https://www.mightyleaf.com/default.aspx

Also, if I Were to buy a tea pot, what should I be looking for? Some are glass, some are clay, others cast iron......

I'd imagine the best quality can be obtained buying and brewing with loose teas. I'd like to buy a pot that allows her to brew both ways. Ideally a modern design.

Thanks,

Joe


Edited by CRUZMISL (log)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If you want Asian/Chinese varieties of tea, particularly Jasmine, I would check out Ten Ren, which is one of the largest importers and retailers of Asian teas in the world.

In New York and San Francisco, and in Chinatowns in several other major cities, Ten Ren has retail stores, but they also have an online store:

http://www.tenren.com/jasmine.html

http://www.tenren.com/teabags.html

Some Asian supermarkets also carry Ten Ren teas, but if you want the best selection you should go to a Ten Ren store or order from their website.

Obviously, their very best stuff is loose leaf, but I have a few boxes of their teabags (which I am using with my pod brewing machine) and they are very good.


Jason Perlow

Co-Founder, The Society for Culinary Arts & Letters

offthebroiler.com - Food Blog | View my food photos on Instagram

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Thanks!

Anyone buy from this place?

https://www.mightyleaf.com/default.aspx

Also, if I Were to buy a tea pot, what should I be looking for? Some are glass, some are clay, others cast iron......

I'd imagine the best quality can be obtained buying and brewing with loose teas. I'd like to buy a pot that allows her to brew both ways. Ideally a modern design.

Thanks,

Joe

Both Adagio and harney's are good.

I have been buying tea and tea brewing items from Upton Teas

www.uptontea.com

IMOP they are one of the best outlets anywhere.

One idea for you--they offer gift setw that include loose tea--along with the Chatsford Mug infuser system.

The "system" is a really nice Chatsford hand painted bone china cup/mug with a simple mesh basket that fits inside--you can basically, brew an individual cup of tea. I use this all the time.

they also have tea pots etc.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Thanks!

Anyone buy from this place?

https://www.mightyleaf.com/default.aspx

Also, if I Were to buy a tea pot, what should I be looking for? Some are glass, some are clay, others cast iron......

I'd imagine the best quality can be obtained buying and brewing with loose teas. I'd like to buy a pot that allows her to brew both ways. Ideally a modern design.

Thanks,

Joe

There are many teapots available with infusers. However, for a true loose tea experience, the best way is to have two teapots, one for brewing the tea which is then strained into the serving pot.

You want something that will hold the heat long enough for the tea to be served. Earthenware and cast iron hold heat the longest, however there are some insulated teapots that are excellent and are modern in style. The classic "Brown Betty" holds heat quite well. Glass, except for the very expensive double-walled insulated (and hard to find) item does not hold heat well unless you cover it with a cozy.

I have a somewhat large collection of teapots that I have been adding to for more than 40 years.

Amazon has a large selection.

Note that the BonJour Classic insulated is now on sale (scroll down half-way on the page)

On page 4 you can see an "Old Dutch" teapot with chrome cozy. I have several similar teapots made by Hall China which are often found on ebay. They are very nice and do keep tea at perfect serving temperature.

I am sure this is more than you want to know, but I am somewhat fanatic about teapots.


"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I forgot to mention

Special Teas

and of course,

Republic of Tea These can be found in many stores, Barnes & Noble usually carries almost all of their teas, both loose and bagged.

I particularly like the Blackberry Sage (real dried fruits in the mix)

and purchase of some of their teas include a donation to cancer research. They also carry Fair Trade teas which I think are very important.

You can also ask questions here about various tea items.


"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I love Mighty Leaf; discovered them through my s-i-l. Their tea bags are stunning; not sure what they're made of, but each bag is individually wrapped, and the material they use for the bag is like fabric. I have some of their peppermint, and it's definitely a favorite. Their standard shipping is fast, too.

The other site I'd recommend is Stash Tea.


"I'm not eating it...my tongue is just looking at it!" --My then-3.5 year-old niece, who was NOT eating a piece of gum

"Wow--this is a fancy restaurant! They keep bringing us more water and we didn't even ask for it!" --My 5.75 year-old niece, about Bread Bar

"He's jumped the flounder, as you might say."

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On page 4 you can see an "Old Dutch" teapot with chrome cozy.  I have several similar teapots made by Hall China which are often found on ebay.  They are very nice and do keep tea at perfect serving temperature.

I am sure this is more than you want to know, but I am somewhat fanatic about teapots.

I love the Hall teapots. I have 2 of them, and two of similar build made by McCormick, that I found at various flea markets & street fairs over the years. They are the best! Not terribly elegant, but they really do the job, and I'm fanatical about that.


Thank God for tea! What would the world do without tea? How did it exist? I am glad I was not born before tea!

- Sydney Smith, English clergyman & essayist, 1771-1845

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On page 4 you can see an "Old Dutch" teapot with chrome cozy.  I have several similar teapots made by Hall China which are often found on ebay.  They are very nice and do keep tea at perfect serving temperature.

I am sure this is more than you want to know, but I am somewhat fanatic about teapots.

I love the Hall teapots. I have 2 of them, and two of similar build made by McCormick, that I found at various flea markets & street fairs over the years. They are the best! Not terribly elegant, but they really do the job, and I'm fanatical about that.

I have found that any Hall teapot will hold the heat longer than just about any other type. I have a couple of the old style McMormick with the curved "dripless" spout. I found it at a yard sale and had collected a box of other stuff. The lady said she would throw the teapot in because "that old thing was my mama's and I don't have any use for it." I also bought almost a complete set of Bauer dinnerware from her for $10.00. She said she would have kept it if it was "Fiesta" ..... Shame on me, I didn't tell her Fiesta was copied from the Bauer "ringware"....


"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I forgot to mention

Special Teas

and of course,

Republic of Tea  These can be found in many stores, Barnes & Noble usually carries almost all of their teas, both loose and bagged. 

I particularly like the Blackberry Sage (real dried fruits in the mix)

and purchase of some of their teas include a donation to cancer research.  They also carry Fair Trade teas which I think are very important.

You can also ask questions here about various tea items.

I second Republic of Tea!!

All their teas i've tried so far are good but the one that we really love is their kiwi pear green tea.

Do you have Costplus where you live. They have a whole range of teas.

AShiana

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I have found that any Hall teapot will hold the heat longer than just about any other type.  I have a couple of the old style McMormick with the curved "dripless" spout.  I found it at a yard sale and had collected a box of other stuff.  The lady said she would throw the teapot in because "that old thing was my mama's and I don't have any use for it."  I also bought almost a complete set of Bauer dinnerware from her for $10.00.  She said she would have kept it if it was "Fiesta" .....  Shame on me, I didn't tell her Fiesta was copied from the Bauer "ringware"....

Ah serendipity! :smile:

The top on my favorite Hall split in two after several drops. I have to glue it back together annually, I can't find a glue that will hold up with daily use. I suppose I should get to haunting eBay.

(Somewhat OT but these all sort of relate to gift ideas for tea lovers, right?)


Edited by ghostrider (log)

Thank God for tea! What would the world do without tea? How did it exist? I am glad I was not born before tea!

- Sydney Smith, English clergyman & essayist, 1771-1845

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

jasmine tea

www.imperialtea.com

www.houdeasianart.com

www.enjoyingtea.com

teapots

www.allteapots.com

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Scroll down a bit to find some of the delightful teas here. I love Mariage Freres (the oldest tea purveyors in France, I think), though I do prefer their loose teas--much more variety of flavours. But if bags are a must, then I would suggest the Marco Polo (if she likes flavoured teas), along with the French Breakfast. Actually, depending on how much you're willing to spend, you could just get all the bagged teas for variety!

Mariage Freres teas are beautifully packaged. The shop to which I linked is The Cultured Cup, somewhere in Texas. If you're in that area, you could just drop by. They're very friendly and helpful, and I'm sure they could do something about gift-wrapping the gift. Or if you're looking for more variety, and can read French, you can try the Mariage Freres homepage. You can order on-line and they ship internationally. I've never had much luck with the English link on the site, but the Japanese one works!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
House of Tea, which is local for me, has a wonderful selection of loose teas, tea accessories and great customer service.

Katie M. Loeb
Booze Muse, Spiritual Advisor

Author: Shake, Stir, Pour:Fresh Homegrown Cocktails

Cheers!
Bartendrix,Intoxicologist, Beverage Consultant, Philadelphia, PA
Captain Liberty of the Good Varietals, Aphrodite of Alcohol

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm not going pump up my own site here.. (though i should do an eGullet-only special of some sort, no?)... But i'll happily continue the discussion of which teas to drink...

I mostly handle Wuyi mountain oolongs and Anxi oolongs, but obviously also the typical green/white and scented favorites.. And I find people in north American are still pretty much in the dark as far as the variety of teas goes. Jasmine is indeed great, and where I am, people drink it a lot more than in the south of China. But there is some seriously good stuff out there for those of you wanting to experience something truly amazing. Think of jasmine tea as just the beginning. Anyway, I really recommend for anyone wanting to know.. please visit a good Chinese tea shop and do not be afraid to sit down and try a bunch of different teas!

The problem with online shops (mine included) is that they are not modeled after their Chinese retail brick and mortar teashops. In China it is often expected that before you buy from a group of teas that you have little knowledge of, you can first taste them! So online shops I would say are best for those that know more or less what they want.

happy tea drinking

Joel

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Or if you're looking for more variety, and can read French, you can try the Mariage Freres homepage.  You can order on-line and they ship internationally. 

Wonderful teas!!

Also, in the US I've had good luck with TeaLuxe


fanatic...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Tea Source is another very good place to shop for teas and all other things tea-related. The proprietor, Bill Waddington, used to be a pseudo-regular on NPR's The Splendid Table. Maybe he still is; I haven't listened in a while.

We cannot employ the mind to advantage when we are filled with excessive food and drink - Cicero

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

At least some of the Mariage Freres teas are usually available at Williams Sonoma stores. I just bought some for my sister in law last week.

Personally, I put in a vote for Upton.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Sign in to follow this  

  • Similar Content

    • By liuzhou
      This arose from this topic, where initially @Anna N asked about tea not being served at the celebratory meal I attended. I answered that it is uncommon for tea to be served with meals (with one major exception). I was then asked for further elucidation by @Smithy. I did start replying on the topic but the answer got longer than I anticipated and was getting away from the originally intended topic about one specific meal. So here were are..
       
      I'd say there are four components to tea drinking in China.

      a) When you arrive at a restaurant, you are often given a pot of tea which people will sip while contemplating the menu and waiting for other  guests to arrive. Dining out is very much a group activity, in the main. When everyone is there and the food dishes start to arrive the tea is nearly always forgotten about. The tea served like this will often be a fairly cheap, common brand - usually green.
       
      You also may be given a cup of tea in a shop if your purchase is a complicated one. I recently bought a new lap top and the shop assistant handed me tea to sip as she took down the details of my requirements. Also, I recently had my eyes re-tested in order to get new spectacles. Again, a cup of tea was provided. Visit someone in an office or have a formal meeting and tea or water will be provided.
       
      b) You see people walking about with large flasks (not necessarily vacuum flasks) of tea which they sip during the day to rehydrate themselves. Taxi drivers, bus drivers, shop keepers etc all have their tea flask.  Of course, the tea goes cold. I have a vacuum flask, but seldom use it - not a big tea fan. There are shops just dedicated to selling the drinks flasks.
       
      c) There has been a recent fashion for milk tea and bubble tea here, two trends imported from Hong Kong and Taiwan respectively. It is sold from kiosks and mainly attracts younger customers. McDonald's and KFC both do milk and bubble teas.
       

      Bubble and Milk Tea Stall
       

      And Another
       

      And another - there are hundreds of them around!
       

      McDonald's Ice Cream and Drinks Kiosk.


      McDonald's Milk Tea Ad
       
      d) There are very formal tea tastings and tea ceremonies, similar in many ways to western wine tastings. These usually take place in tea houses where you can sample teas and purchase the tea for home use. These places can be expensive and some rare teas attract staggering prices. The places doing this pride themselves on preparing the tea perfectly and have their special rituals. I've been a few times, usually with friends, but it's not really my thing. Below is one of the oldest serious tea houses in the city. As you can see, they don't go out of their way to attract custom. Their name implies they are an educational service as much as anything else. Very expensive!
       

      Tea House

      Supermarkets and corner shops carry very little tea. This is the entire tea shelving in my local supermarket. Mostly locally grown green tea.
       

       

      Local Guangxi Tea
       
      The most expensive in the supermarket was this Pu-er Tea (普洱茶 pǔ ěr chá) from Yunnan province. It works out at ¥0.32per gram as opposed to ¥0.08 for the local stuff. However, in the tea houses, prices can go much, much higher!
       

       
       
    • By Kasia
      Even though I would like to change the situation, the winter is coming. Sooner or later there will be sharp winds, frost and unpleasant moisture. I don't know how you like to warm up at home, but on the first cold day I dust off my home recipe for hot and yummy winter teas.

      You can use my recipe or come up with your own proposals for fiery mixtures. Only one thing should be the same: your favourite tea must be strong and hot.

      Ingredients (for 2 teas)
      Raspberry-orange
      8 cloves
      a piece of cinnamon
      2 grains of cardamom
      4 slices of orange
      2 teaspoons of honey
      your favourite tea
      50ml of raspberry juice or 30ml of raspberry juice and 30ml of raspberry liqueur
      Add 4 of the cloves, cinnamon and cardamom to some water and boil for a while to release their flavour and aroma. Remove the seasoning and brew the tea with this water. Crush two slices of orange with honey. Add the raspberry juice or a mixture of juice and liqueur to the tea. Next add the honey with orange. Mix it in. Decorate the tea with the rest of the cloves and orange.

      Lemon-ginger
      8 cloves
      3 slices of fresh ginger
      2 grains of cardamom
      50ml of ginger syrup or 30ml of ginger syrup and 30ml of ginger-lemon liqueur
      4 slices of lemon
      2 teaspoons of honey
      Add 4 of the cloves, ginger and cardamom to some water and boil for a while to release their flavour and aroma. Remove the seasoning and brew the tea with this water. Crush two slices of lemon with honey. Add the ginger syrup or mixture of syrup and liqueur to the tea. Next add honey with lemon. Mix it in. Decorate the tea with the rest of the cloves and lemon.

      Enjoy your drink!

    • By Hezo541
      My friend sent me some Chinese tea called Songxiang tea. 
      Has anybody drunk this kind of tea? It's the first time I've heard of this tea.

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...