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Celsius soda actually burns calories


Gifted Gourmet
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the website for Celsius

What if a soda could actually burn calories?

This simple question sparked more than two years of scientific research and taste trials that led to the development of Celsius™, the first calorie-burning soda that boosts energy levels.

Our double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical research confirmed its functional benefit. We discovered that Celsius:

raises metabolism by 12% and significantly increases calorie-burning for three hours

Seems that it is only available in a few states at the moment ...

Are you game to try it?

Comments?

Melissa Goodman aka "Gifted Gourmet"

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I guess I'd ask two things:

1) was the publication from the trial published in a peer reviewed journal? 1a) I'd want to see how many people were in the study, how it was measured, etc.

2) has the FDA evaluated this or is just something that the manufacturer claims?

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I guess I'd ask two things:

1) was the publication from the trial published in a peer reviewed journal?  1a)  I'd want to see how many people were in the study, how it was measured, etc.

2) has the FDA evaluated this or is just something that the manufacturer claims?

Ok - I read the abstract on their web site. It's was only published in poster form which is not peer reviewed. It also states that there were only 20 people in the study. Achieving statistical significance would be unlikely with this group.

I'd be skeptical. Very skeptical.

Edited by robb (log)
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there were only 20 people in the study.  Achieving statistical significance would be unlikely with this group.

I'd be skeptical.  Very skeptical.

I wouldn't be so rough on the sample size. They aren't doing an FDA study here.

I believe their sample size is reasonable, but I'm really skeptical of their intentions.

Money-grubbing wankers...

I always attempt to have the ratio of my intelligence to weight ratio be greater than one. But, I am from the midwest. I am sure you can now understand my life's conundrum.

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Ok - I read the abstract on their web site.  It's was only published in poster form which is not peer reviewed.  It also states that there were only 20 people in the study.  Achieving statistical significance would be unlikely with this group.

I'd be skeptical too, but let me say that you can get statistically significant results with a small sample IF the effect size is large.

"If you hear a voice within you say 'you cannot paint,' then by all means paint, and that voice will be silenced" - Vincent Van Gogh
 

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A look at the "active" (and I use those quotation marks thoughtfully) ingredients shows that Celsius has a makeup remarkably similar to that of Red Bull and other energy drinks, except that it's made with Splenda instead of corn syrup. Of course, any perceived energy boost might be solely from the caffeine. When they say, "increased metabolism," I wonder if they really mean increased heart rate.

Now if they made it with, say, N-rayed polywater, I might buy me some. Well, after I finish the bridge payments, anyway.

On second thought, just give me a latte.

Mike Harney

"If you're afraid of your food, you're probably not digesting it right because your stomach is all crunched up in fear. So you'll end up not being well."

- Julia Child

"There's no reason to say I'm narrow-minded. Just do it my way and you will have no problem at all."

- KSC Pad Leader Guenter Wendt

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It doesn't seem that far out of line to me. They have reasonable amounts of caffeine, certainly more than the diet soda they were testing. That alone will have a measurable effect on the basal metabolic rate of most people.

But, looking at what they claim from the poster session, they did some reasonable tests on metabolic rate--indirect calorimetry and vO2 or something similar.

I always attempt to have the ratio of my intelligence to weight ratio be greater than one. But, I am from the midwest. I am sure you can now understand my life's conundrum.

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There is plenty of evidence that caffeine can have a modest but measurable effect on weight loss. I don't know about the other ingredients though.

"If you hear a voice within you say 'you cannot paint,' then by all means paint, and that voice will be silenced" - Vincent Van Gogh
 

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Ok - I read the abstract on their web site.  It's was only published in poster form which is not peer reviewed.  It also states that there were only 20 people in the study.  Achieving statistical significance would be unlikely with this group.

I'd be skeptical too, but let me say that you can get statistically significant results with a small sample IF the effect size is large.

I know. But, they don't disclose much detail and, as I noted above, they didn't have enought confidence to submit the data to a publication where the data would be peer reviewed. After being active in the scientific / medical industry for over 20 years where peer review of results and analysis is required for credibility, this makes me skeptical.

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From their website, it sounds like they're claiming the "green tea leaf" is what boosts metabolism.

I'm also a skeptic.

Independent of this, there are several studies about green tea and it's effect on metabolism and weight loss.

Katie M. Loeb
Booze Muse, Spiritual Advisor

Author: Shake, Stir, Pour:Fresh Homegrown Cocktails

Cheers!
Bartendrix,Intoxicologist, Beverage Consultant, Philadelphia, PA
Captain Liberty of the Good Varietals, Aphrodite of Alcohol

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After being active in the scientific / medical industry for over 20 years where peer review of results and analysis is required for credibility, this makes me skeptical.

Whoa, whoa. Easy there, robb. Remember that oftentimes presenting a poster is one of the early steps of presenting research.

Also, their target audience is not science-types or the FDA. They aren't going to try to have this prescribed as a drug. They just want some data that supports their claim and they don't want to make it up.

Don't beat them for being in early stages of their research. If you don't like it, don't buy it. But their methods, at least as reported, seem sound. Whether they lied or not is another question.

I always attempt to have the ratio of my intelligence to weight ratio be greater than one. But, I am from the midwest. I am sure you can now understand my life's conundrum.

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Ok - I read the abstract on their web site.  It's was only published in poster form which is not peer reviewed.  It also states that there were only 20 people in the study.  Achieving statistical significance would be unlikely with this group.

I'd be skeptical too, but let me say that you can get statistically significant results with a small sample IF the effect size is large.

I know. But, they don't disclose much detail and, as I noted above, they didn't have enought confidence to submit the data to a publication where the data would be peer reviewed. After being active in the scientific / medical industry for over 20 years where peer review of results and analysis is required for credibility, this makes me skeptical.

I'm not faulting you at all for being skeptical. My point that statistical significance is a function of both effect size and sample size does not reflect a judgement on my part with respect to the efficacy of Celcius as a weight-loss tool. :biggrin:

"If you hear a voice within you say 'you cannot paint,' then by all means paint, and that voice will be silenced" - Vincent Van Gogh
 

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After being active in the scientific / medical industry for over 20 years where peer review of results and analysis is required for credibility, this makes me skeptical.

Whoa, whoa. Easy there, robb. Remember that oftentimes presenting a poster is one of the early steps of presenting research.

Also, their target audience is not science-types or the FDA. They aren't going to try to have this prescribed as a drug. They just want some data that supports their claim and they don't want to make it up.

Don't beat them for being in early stages of their research. If you don't like it, don't buy it. But their methods, at least as reported, seem sound. Whether they lied or not is another question.

I understand and am not suggesting they are lying. I'm simply saying that the data are thin for a claim, thus my statements about being skeptical. That's all.

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