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Black Forest Cake?

18 posts in this topic

I've had a request.

Can someone give me the world's best recipe?

Thanks in advance.

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The worlds best recipe is in the December 2005 issue of Cuisine at Home. It is incredible. It makes a cherry compote out of cherry juice, dried tart cherries, cherry preserves and frozen dark cherries (I used canned tart because I couldn't get frozen, worked great.)

It also stabilizes the whipped cream filling with a cornstarch "pudding".

It uses their wonderful chocolate cake recipe. Moist and delicious. It also has grated chocolate and chocolate curls between the layers.

I cannot imagine a better one.

-Becca


-Becca

www.porterhouse.typepad.com

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lemoncurd made one that looked amazing. I think it is in the pierre herme thread. I'll take a look for it later.


Don't wait for extraordinary opportunities. Seize common occasions and make them great. Orison Swett Marden

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There's indeed a Black Forest cake recipe in Pierre Herme's Chocolate Desserts book, page 11-15. It's made with his cocoa cake, chocolate whipped cream, kirsh soaking syrup, kirsh-flavoured cream, port-soaked cherries, and garnished with sour cherries.

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lemoncurd made one that looked amazing. I think it is in the pierre herme thread. I'll take a look for it later.

Here's the link with pictures. As Lorna said, it's from Pierre Herme's Chocolate Desserts.


Don't wait for extraordinary opportunities. Seize common occasions and make them great. Orison Swett Marden

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The worlds best recipe is in the December 2005 issue of Cuisine at Home.

Thanks. Someone else recommended this recipe. I'll give it a try.

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A new member, lukestar, recently posted a recipe request for a Black Forest cake (Shorty Leonard’s Black Forest Cake) in the Louisiana forum here. The cake sounds intriguing so I cross-posted his request in this thread in the Pastry and Baking Forum.

Hi,

Shorty Leonard was a well known chef in Shreveport over the past 30 years. Shorty died in 2003 after a legnthy career in several well known Shreveport restraunts. His claim to fame was his famous or infamous Black Forest Cake. This is my wifes favorite desert of all times. This cake did not have cherrys like most Black Forest Cakes have in them. I have been looking for a recipe that is close to Mr. Leonard recipe. If anyone has his or one that is close I would appreciate a little help. It is Valentines Day and I am trying my best to find the recipe to make my wife of 27 years happy.

thanks,

lukestar


"Under the dusty almond trees, ... stalls were set up which sold banana liquor, rolls, blood puddings, chopped fried meat, meat pies, sausage, yucca breads, crullers, buns, corn breads, puff pastes, longanizas, tripes, coconut nougats, rum toddies, along with all sorts of trifles, gewgaws, trinkets, and knickknacks, and cockfights and lottery tickets."

-- Gabriel Garcia Marquez, 1962 "Big Mama's Funeral"

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This is the recipe I use:

Black Forest Cherry Cake

It is the closest recipe to the one my uncle served at his German restaurant.

The cake I speak of did not have cherrys or a cherry filling. It had a chocolate frosting but the cake layers were malted tasting. They had a crunch to them kind of like a malt ball.

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I will second Lorna's opinion in Pierre Herme's book. The port soaked cherries make a whole world of difference and the interplay between all the components really taste good!

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This is the recipe I use:

Black Forest Cherry Cake

It is the closest recipe to the one my uncle served at his German restaurant.

The cake I speak of did not have cherrys or a cherry filling. It had a chocolate frosting but the cake layers were malted tasting. They had a crunch to them kind of like a malt ball.

I have never heard of a Black Forest Cherry Cake without cherries.

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In a <a href="http://forums.egullet.org/index.php?showtopic=21737&view=findpost&p=1062580">

post</a> on a thread

on the Time-Life series <i>Foods of the World</i>

I posted in part:

<blockquote>

There is a Black Forest Cherry Cake (<i>Schartzwälder Kirsch

Torte</i>) recipe that is difficult to make but good: The

cake itself has lots of eggs and some powdered cocoa but very

little flour, takes some special handling, but is unusual,

unique or nearly so. Learn how to handle the cake, get a good

source of cherries, learn how to make and handle the

decorative chocolate curls, get some whipped cream that can

hold up, use high quality <i>Kirschwasser,</i> do much of the

work in a cold kitchen (in the winter, with the windows

open!), and can have a winner.

</blockquote>

The recipe is on pages 160-162 of <i>The Cooking of

Germany</i> (1969)

and has a large picture of the final cake spread

across pages 161 and 162 and taking up about half the total

area of those two pages.

<br><br>

It would be far too expensive for a US commercial bakery to do

that recipe

at all routinely.

It's the best <i>Schartzwälder Kirsch Torte</i> I've had,

but I'm no expert and haven't compared with the best of

Bavaria and haven't worked from another source.


What would be the right food and wine to go with

R. Strauss's 'Ein Heldenleben'?

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Being from Shreveport, I can remember eating at Shorty Leonard's restaurant as a child and having Black Forest Cake and even now it is a staple at parties and events, and the cake does not have cherries in the version in Shreveport, LA. That is so entirely cool to me as I never knew that our Black Forest Cake was regional. As an adult, I don't eat chocolate so it would have never occured to me to wonder that our version was different.

Anyway, I just wanted to attest to lukestar's recollections and knowledge. And to state that I have replied to his request on the Louisiana forum.

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The worlds best recipe is in the December 2005 issue of Cuisine at Home. It is incredible. It makes a cherry compote out of cherry juice, dried tart cherries, cherry preserves and frozen dark cherries (I used canned tart because I couldn't get frozen, worked great.)

It also stabilizes the whipped cream filling with a cornstarch "pudding".

It uses their wonderful chocolate cake recipe. Moist and delicious. It also has grated chocolate and chocolate curls between the layers.

I cannot imagine a better one.

-Becca

Becca was right!! It was fabulous.

gallery_25969_665_175636.jpg

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Nice Randi. I'm a fan of the Pierre Herme version and the Heston Blumenthal version is really good (but a lot of work) but that looks really tasty. I like black forest but have to make it myself if I want it because all you can get locally are the dry cake/canned cherry pie filling/cool whip atrocities.


It's kinda like wrestling a gorilla... you don't stop when you're tired, you stop when the gorilla is tired.

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Randi, That cake looks amazing! Black Forest is my husband's all time favorite cake, I'd really like to make it for his birthday. I've been poking around for this recipe but can't find it anywhere. Would you mind sharing it?

Thanks!


hungryburro.com-- tasty healthy food from around the world

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Randi, That cake looks amazing! Black Forest is my husband's all time favorite cake, I'd really like to make it for his birthday. I've been poking around for this recipe but can't find it anywhere. Would you mind sharing it?

Thanks!

I second that request, please! I'd really appreciate it as well. :smile:


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I think Fruit and Cream Delight dessert is more suitable for you as its very healthy and delicious you can get this recipe and many more dessert recipes on my blog, hopefully you will like it.


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