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Induction & Cast Iron Cookware


Blondelle
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Thanks to someones suggestion here, I plan on using the Sunpentown induction burner with Le Creuset as a slow cooker. Someone with chef's training said not to, as the retained heat in the cast iron after cooking would damage the induction element, and he's seen it happen I don't see though how this heat would be different though than the burner being on with the pot on top.

Does anyone have any long term (this hasn't been around that long) experience using the Le Creuset with an induction burner with long, slow cooking? Any problems with the combo?

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I don't have any experience here, but one of the induction burner websites I read (that was linked from the recent discussion of induction burners) mentioned that you should not use cast iron or enamel. LeC being both seems like a bad idea...

edited to add details

Edited by Eden (log)

Do you suffer from Acute Culinary Syndrome? Maybe it's time to get help...

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Thanks to someones suggestion here, I plan on using the Sunpentown induction burner with Le Creuset as a slow cooker. Someone with chef's training said not to, as the retained heat in the cast iron after cooking would damage the induction element, and he's seen it happen I don't see though how this heat would be different though than the burner being on with the pot on top.

Does anyone have any long term (this hasn't been around that long) experience using the Le Creuset with an induction burner with long, slow cooking? Any problems with the combo?

Why don't you try contacting the mfg? I'd think they'd have the straight skinny.

-john

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Le Crueset will definitely heat up on an induction burner; I've used it on one. I'm trying to remember if I've ever left a piece of LC on an induction burner for a long time, and I think that I have, but I wouldn't swear to it. Sorry -- I guess that's not much help.

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  • 3 weeks later...
Thanks to someones suggestion here, I plan on using the Sunpentown induction burner with Le Creuset as a slow cooker. Someone with chef's training said not to, as the retained heat in the cast iron after cooking would damage the induction element, and he's seen it happen I don't see though how this heat would be different though than the burner being on with the pot on top.

Does anyone have any long term (this hasn't been around that long) experience using the Le Creuset with an induction burner with long, slow cooking? Any problems with the combo?

Le Creuset's site's FAQ say that it's suitable for induction:

<a href="http://www.lecreuset.com/usa/content.php?name=FAQ#heatsource">What heat sources can Le Creuset be used on?</a>.

quote:

All! You can use Le Creuset cast iron with confidence on whatever heat source you choose - Induction, halogen, ceramic, gas, electric ring and solid plate, and solid fuel (e.g. Aga, Rayburn).

**********

IIRC when I had a Sunpentown burner (I have a higher wattage Iwatani now) one limiting factor was the capacity of the pan (I don't remember if 8 quarts was the max or was too big). I used my 5.5 quart le Creuset pot on it without a problem, but I made soup, which only took a couple of hours, or chili ... ditto.

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It's been several years since I used induction, but I did use Le Creuset on it all the time. Heat is heat, and retained heat is no hotter than heat for immediate cooking. I don't think I'd want to invest in an induction cooker that can't handle the potential heat it generates (even though it is indirect, as it's the pot that is heated, not an element).

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As far as I can tell, the Sunpentown products are sold as "Mr. Induction" via Springusa.com. On their web site, they have list a PDF user manual for the Mr. Induction product(s), on which, they specifically state iron and enameled cookware as "suitable". See page 6: Mr. Induction User Manual.

Here is the bread crumb trail:

On this Sunpentown USA page, you can see where they claim to be sold exclusively through SpringUSA.com.

On page 2 of this Springusa.com product catalog, you see that the "Mr. Induction" products have part numbers that match the ones that are on the Sunpentown USA web site.

Following the Induction Ranges link from the main page shows the link to the user manual.

I think if the mfg says it is OK to use the cookware, you are good to go.

-john

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  • 4 years later...

I need to fill a few voids in my current collection of Falk, AC, and cast iron cookware but I'm adding a countertop induction burner to the mix which obviously isnt compatible with the Falk. Thats prompted me to reevaluate my options. The Demeyere Atlantis stuff looks pretty nice and I was wondering if anyone had any experience comparing the two. My plan is to use the induction burner mainly for making pasta and the like (in which case, I'd just buy the cheapest induction cookware I could find) but, from what Ive been reading, it may quickly find other uses. I never thought I would even consider anything other than gas, but it seems at least possible that I might end up preferring induction which would make buying more Falk a waste. However, the gas range/countertop induction setup might ultimately be the best solution, in which case both types of cookware will have there place. Any thoughts or other suggestions?

Edited by PBHokie (log)

I thoroughly disapprove of duels...If a man should challenge me, I would take him kindly and forgivingly by the hand and lead him to a quiet retired spot...and kill him. ~Mark Twain

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I have a normal gas range and the Viking single burner unit on the side next to my prep area. The induction is really much faster then gas for many things, sometimes saves me when my timing is off.

That said, for boiling water it super quick but a waste, you could do that in an electric kettle nearly as quick unless you need a large amount.

The reason why I use my gas range more often is simply that it has the vent installed over it. I don't want to cook anything that splatters or smells on the induction cooktop without the vent so consider how you place it - that may drive how you end up using it.

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