• Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create an account.

  • product-image-quickten.png.a40203b506711f7664fc62024e54a584.pngDid you know that these all-volunteer forums are operated by the 501(c)3 not-for-profit Society for Culinary Arts & Letters? This holiday season, consider a tax-deductible Quick Ten Bucks to support the eG Forums and help us remain completely advertising-free. Thanks to all those who have donated so far!

Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0
WHS

Mommy Dearest - any good home cooking?

4 posts in this topic

For a while there, your mom was taking a pretty heavy beating from you on the editor's page (and in your books). I remember going home for the first time after living on my own, and being shocked by how BAD my mother's cooking was. (Whenever I pass a restaurant that has a sign that says "Fine Family Dining" a shiver goes down my spine.) So my question to you: Did your mother make anything that conjures up fond memories?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
For a while there, your mom was taking a pretty heavy beating from you on the editor's page (and in your books).  I remember going home for the first time after living on my own, and being shocked by how BAD my mother's cooking was.  (Whenever I pass a restaurant that has a sign that says "Fine Family Dining" a shiver goes down my spine.)  So my question to you:  Did your mother make anything that conjures up fond memories?

Yes, my mother cooked the greatest corn I've ever eaten. We had a house in Connecticut, and she had a farmer she got corn from. She'd call him, tell him to go pick, and put a pot of water on to boil. She liked little white ears - at a time when NOBODY wanted them - so the farmer was thrilled to give her the stuff nobody else wanted. She'd come home from Renzulli's, we'd shuck really fast, and then she'd cook the corn for about a minute. Sweet butter, a little salt - nothing's ever tasted better.

She also cooked great lobsters. Got them from some guy down at the shore.

She could shop: She just didn't believe (really) that anything went bad, anything needed to cook for more than about 10 minutes, or that any combinations wouldn't work.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have to say, I just re-read Tender at the Bone, and I still can't get over the chapters about your mother's food - they are some of my favorite parts, both in how they illustrate your personality and relationship with your mother, and just for the pure shock/humor factor.

Ruth, do you think your early exposure to less-than-fresh food helped you develop the strong, adventurous stomach necessary for life as a food writer, reviewer and editor?


Edited by Megan Blocker (log)

"We had dry martinis; great wing-shaped glasses of perfumed fire, tangy as the early morning air." - Elaine Dundy, The Dud Avocado

Queenie Takes Manhattan

eG Foodblogs: 2006 - 2007

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I have to say, I just re-read Tender at the Bone, and I still can't get over the chapters about your mother's food - they are some of my favorite parts, both in how they illustrate your personality and relationship with your mother, and just for the pure shock/humor factor.

Yes, the slap of recognition was strong. Vivid memories of my (japanese) mother include digging for tiny clams next to an oil refinery in Tokyo Bay and making a potentially toxic miso soup, and her finest moment: stealing the cook away from the German ambassador when we lived in Bangkok--we ate sauerbraten in 90 degree heat for months...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.