Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

lighter than air dinner rolls


KitchenQueen
 Share

Recommended Posts

I had a recipe for yeast dinners rolls that would float away if you didn't hold them down, and the flavor was melt-in-your-mouth heaven.

I threw it out by mistake,about 4 months ago.. This is nearly suicide time if I can't replace it. Yes, I realize having only only paper copy was the ultimate in stupidity.

The dough was impossibly gummy at first, before the first rise.

Got it many years ago from a relative, now deceased. No one else has it.

Ring a bell? I need your best recipe. I've been baking and throwing rolls to the birds for months now.

HELP!!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I have an old one from Sunset's Bread Cookbook that might be similar. Are yours pan rolls? Mine only take one rise, but they're really light and fluffy. They call for a lot of melted butter in the pan before you plot them in, and then a lot more poured over the top after they rise.

If this sounds like it's similar, I'd be happy to share it.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

This recipe has been on my list to try; maybe some other egulleteer has experience with it: (I haven't baked much from this book to date, but I've heard others praise many of the basic cake and bread recipes in the book).

"Light-as-a-Dream Hot Rolls" by Shirley Corriher in "Cookwise".

Here is her description of the recipe:

"These rolls have a real homemade hot roll taste. They are extraordinarily light and tender and very hard to stop eating. This recipe is from Marion, Arkansas, and is my version..."

There are two risings; the first is either a few hours or overnight. The second is for ~ 1 1/2 hrs. Melted butter is brushed over the tops before baking. The dough is shaped into balls and baked inside muffin tins or else baked on sheets as Parker House rolls.

Thanks for your personal recs, Jaz and Jaybassin.

Welcome to egullet, KitchenQueen! Sorry that you lost your recipe; it's a warning for me to secure a few treasured ones that are also just on scraps of paper... Hoping you find a replacement soon.

Edited by ludja (log)

"Under the dusty almond trees, ... stalls were set up which sold banana liquor, rolls, blood puddings, chopped fried meat, meat pies, sausage, yucca breads, crullers, buns, corn breads, puff pastes, longanizas, tripes, coconut nougats, rum toddies, along with all sorts of trifles, gewgaws, trinkets, and knickknacks, and cockfights and lottery tickets."

-- Gabriel Garcia Marquez, 1962 "Big Mama's Funeral"

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 months later...
I have an old one from Sunset's Bread Cookbook that might be similar. Are yours pan rolls? Mine only take one rise, but they're really light and fluffy. They call for a lot of melted butter in the pan before you plot them in, and then a lot more poured over the top after they rise.

If this sounds like it's similar, I'd be happy to share it.

I would love to have the recipe for this if you don't mind posting or pm'ing me!

I am a terrible baker- don't even ask how flat my biscuits are and would be interested in trying a roll recipe.

THANKS

Della

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I think "lighter than air" rolls get their texture from a combination of technique and ingredients. Tenderness is enhanced by milk, sugar, and or fat (oil, butter, whole eggs or yolks). Don't use high-glutin flour; ap or softer flour is best. Don't worry about over-rising (rolls can over rise better than bread). Keep the dough moist (don't add too much flour).

So, use milk instead of water (if you use liquid milk you need to scald the milk before using it to inactivate the yeast-retarding enzymes); it's easier to use instant nonfat milk powder. Use 2-3 tbs soft butter per lb of flour, and an equal amount of sugar. Knead until soft and smooth. Let rise once, deflate, shape, and let rise again---you can brush the tops with butter, but all that does is aid browning, not flavor.

He who distinguishes the true savor of his food can never be a glutton; he who does not cannot be otherwise. --- Henry David Thoreau
Link to comment
Share on other sites

 Share

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.
×
×
  • Create New...