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cabrales

Favorite Sandwich

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The July/August 2002 edition of Food Arts reports the following: "Ducasse ... this fall he initiates Boulangerie-Epicerie, to be known as BE, in partnership with the well-known Paris baker Eric Kayser. The plan is to offer Ducasse-quality sandwiches with bread made in an oven dominating the center of the restaurant. In addition, there will be a range of about 250 gastronomic grocery products, each selected by Ducasse. The twist will be that only one of each item will be offered, but each will be the best available for the season, according to Ducasse's palate. Eating on the premises will be limited to 20 stand-up spots, so the bulk of the revenue is to come from takeout, a MCDucasse as it were." :hmmm:

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1. How do we know that Ducasse's palate is the sole determining factor.? i.e. how long will it be before other factors come into play (such as pay-offs and vested interests).

2. If the shop is a success, will the producer of the "best" product be really the best or the best of those that can provide the requisite supply?

3. What happens to "variety is the spice of life". I associate lack of choice with failing or underfunded enterprises.

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Robert -- While I agree with your sentiments and, based on Ducasse's cuisine, wouldn't necessarily find products based on his palate particularly attractive (the key point), perhaps there is only one brand of each type of product because, as a marketing matter, it signals to the consumer that Ducasse put some thought into the selection of the brand/producer. Also, I don't know how small the store will be. If there is to be an oven for bread and room (albeit standing) for 20 people and additional space for "restaurant" personnel, perhaps 250 products can only be stored in a limited amount of space? :blink: Perhaps Ducasse is intending to make this a chain if the first store is successful?

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Ducasse's "be" has been open since mid-October.

"be : a few facts

- Name : be [pronounced : bi]

- Address : 73 boulevard de Courcelles - 75008 Paris

- Phone : 01 46 22 20 20- Fax : 01 46 22 20 21

- Open Monday thru' Saturday, 8 a.m. to 9 p.m.

- www.boulangepicier.com - e-mail : contact@boulangepicier.com

- Concept : the very first bakery-grocery store, created by Alain Ducasse and Eric Kayser

- Baker : Boris Vilatte ; Chef : Karl Poussard; Pastry chef : Christian Gonthier

- Menu : breads, grocery essentials, sandwiches, open sandwiches and salads, pastries and donuts, fruit pies and other gourmet delights, " Ready-to-Cook " meals.

- Price : approximately 8 € for an open sandwich, 6 to 8 € for a sandwich, 10 to 20 € for a " Ready-to-Cook " meal."

Sandwiches include (1) olive bread with sardines in olive oil, basil and sun-dried tomatoes, and (2) seaweed bread baked with smoked tuna, salted pressed roe and a salad of winter cress, (3) an open sandwich on stoneground Vitello Tonnato bread :blink:, and (4) whole wheat bread with aged Comte.

A related press release suggests be will carry garum :blink: by Gennaro Esposito!

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Okay Lizziee....you are now officially and enabler...I am going to have to head over to the Marche Aux Delices website and procure a truffle :biggrin: damn!

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Nothing beats a nice crunchy baguette with butter and jambon when you are on the run, but sometimes I want something a little different. The Bellota stand at Gal. Lafayette is one of my favorites - either with the ham or anchovies - but I probably had the best sandwich ever the other day elsewhere. On Rue Cler at the boucherie (directly across from Maison du Jambon) they have a sandwich counter set up outside. In addition to the premade ones, they had a grill going with various items. Madame made me a baguette slathered with mustard, stuffed with hot boudin noir and topped with onions which had been grilling along side (and thus soaking up the juice of) merguez sausage. I thought I'd gone to heaven! MMMMM

Any other favorite sandwich places out there?

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Mostly found on the Riviera, a Pan Bagnat takes all the ingredients of a Salade Nicoise and puts it on a large round bread sliced in half. A Boston-type lettuce, tomatoes, onions, green pepper, and cucumber to start. Add anchovy filets, tuna, nicois olives, and a slather of vinaigrette with a lot of olive oil.

Most of the boulangeries in Nice and environs have this great treat, right next to another favorite, not exactly a sandwich, Pissaladiere.

Oooo, j'ai faim, j'ai faim!!


Edited by menton1 (log)

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cojean?


Anti-alcoholics are unfortunates in the grip of water, that terrible poison, so corrosive that out of all substances it has been chosen for washing and scouring, and a drop of water added to a clear liquid like Absinthe, muddles it." ALFRED JARRY

blog

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Cosi has great sandwiches on freshly baked focaccia-like bread at great prices. I love their roasted tomatoes. It's across the street from Fish at 54 rue de Seine in the 6th. They play opera in the upstairs eating rooms, including one non-smoking.

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How about the truffle sandwich at Michel Rostang? I was there a few years ago for lunch one day when it had just become available for the season. I found it to be a great lunch.

Joan

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I love sandwiches, and all your descriptions are making me hungry. Here are some of my favorites:

1) Cojean (many locations). Yum.

2) Eric Kayser (6th and all over): Anything on his bread.

3) Flûte de Meaux (19th): this little boulangerie makes their sandwiches on an award-winning flûte, so they're fantastic. Near the corner of Jaures and rue de Meaux.

4) Bellota-Bellota (7th): the bocadillos aren't cheap, but they're very good. 18, rue Jean Nicot.

5) Tienda Nueva (9th): take-out Columbian tamales. 57, rue Rodier.

6) Bagels & Brownies (6th): the bagel sandwich with turkey, avocado, swiss, and honey mustard. 12, Rue Notre-Dame-des-Champs.

7) MK2: on a heretical note, the best burger in Paris can be found at the restaurant associated with the MK2 Quai de Seine Cinema in the 19th. And I'm not just saying that because you can eat it overlooking the Bassin de la Villette and afterward be ferried across to your movie in a cute little boat. It's really, really good. http://www.mk2.com/quaideloire/site.html


Edited by mzimbeck (log)

Meg Zimbeck, Paris by Mouth

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8) MK2: to continue on a heretical note, the best burger in Paris can be found at the restaurant associated with the MK2 Quai de Seine Cinema in the 19th. And I'm not just saying that because you can eat it overlooking the Bassin de la Villette and afterward be ferried across to your movie in a cute little boat. It's really, really good.

Really? I love the MK2! :biggrin:

I have only eaten there once though and it was pretty mediocre. I will have to try the hamburger next time.


www.parisnotebook.wordpress.com

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8) MK2: to continue on a heretical note, the best burger in Paris can be found at the restaurant associated with the MK2 Quai de Seine Cinema in the 19th. And I'm not just saying that because you can eat it overlooking the Bassin de la Villette and afterward be ferried across to your movie in a cute little boat. It's really, really good.

Really? I love the MK2! :biggrin:

I have only eaten there once though and it was pretty mediocre. I will have to try the hamburger next time.

You're right! They've redone their restaurant to coincide with the opening of the second theater (Quai de Loire). And the burger, which before was okay and eaten only for nostalgic purposes, has been much-improved with a different bun and sauce. And with better fries. Overall, I do think the food at MK2 is only mediocre, as you'd expect with a cinema restaurant, but the BURGER rocks.


Meg Zimbeck, Paris by Mouth

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Today's L'Express has a review by Jean-Luc Petitrenaud of Boulangerie Julien, 75, rue Saint-Honoré in the 1st raving about his baguette and chocolate tartelette - no mention of a sandwich - but I'll check.


John Talbott

blog John Talbott's Paris

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I'm not sure anything can beat the boudin noir sandwich that opened this thread, but, if only because I've not seen the likes again, I'd have to nominate foie gras pate, onion marmalade and chocolate spread on a crusty baguette. I ordered it only out of curiosity at the Salon du Chocolate several years ago, but it proved to be a rational and dynamite combination.


Robert Buxbaum

WorldTable

Recent WorldTable posts include: comments about reporting on Michelin stars in The NY Times, the NJ proposal to ban foie gras, Michael Ruhlman's comments in blogs about the NJ proposal and Bill Buford's New Yorker article on the Food Network.

My mailbox is full. You may contact me via worldtable.com.

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I'm not sure anything can beat the boudin noir sandwich that opened this thread, but, if only because I've not seen the likes again, I'd have to nominate foie gras pate, onion marmalade and chocolate spread on a crusty baguette. I ordered it only out of curiosity at the Salon du Chocolate several years ago, but it proved to be a rational and dynamite combination.

That sounds very yummy. I've never had onion marmalade. Anyone know how to make it? I think one could come up with a very nice low-brow version of this sandwich with some type of pate, onion marmalad and....what was the chocolate like? Dark or more like nutella? Nutella would be pretty much of a surprise paired with Foie Gras. Talk about high-low.

When we in the south of France last fall we did a lot of picnicking. We would end up with the remains of Salade de Museau, various pates, various cheeses, etc. Salade de Museau, alone or in combo with other things, makes for a very satisfying sandwich.

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My weekly sandwich place is in the Enfant Rouge market. There is a guy who looks like Linus (from the Peanuts cartoon) who has a stand in the second to last row. He slices the bread (which has a texture between sliced bread and baguette), adds a drizzle of olive oil, then continues with lettuce, marinated tomatoes, sauteed mushrooms, caramelized onions, chives, avocado, salt and pepper and your choice of jambon cru, rostello (roasted pork) or a sliced beef similar to bresaola. Finally a choice of and cantel or comte sliced generously over the top. Depending on the wait, sometimes he will toss the sandwich on the crepe griddle and let the cheese melt.

The sandwich is always amazing, but there is one downside. This Linus character spends a lot of time drinking at La Perle down the street and smoking copious amounts of pot. So despite what would seem like a pretty straightforward "Subway Sandwichesque" assembly process, each sandwich takes at least 10 minutes for this "sandwich artist" to build. Like watching a elderly relative with Alzheimer's open the same christmas present fourteen times, the steps to making the same sandwich never seem to register with Linus. I would suggest that if there are more than 3 people in line in front of you, to grab couscous from the next stand down.


"When planning big social gatherings at our home, I wait until the last minute to tell my wife. I figure she is going to worry either way, so I let her worry for two days rather than two weeks."
-EW

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Wonderful Braden.

Question, I need a sandwich for a trip. Will it keep for 12 hours? Can I decontruct and then reconstruct it.

I suspect if he grills it it wouldn't work but cold it might.

My weekly sandwich place is in the Enfant Rouge market. There is a guy who looks like Linus (from the Peanuts cartoon) who has a stand in the second to last row. He slices the bread (which has a texture between sliced bread and baguette), adds a drizzle of olive oil, then continues with lettuce, marinated tomatoes, sauteed mushrooms, caramelized onions, chives, avocado, salt and pepper and your choice of jambon cru, rostello (roasted pork) or a sliced beef similar to bresaola. Finally a choice of and cantel or comte sliced generously over the top. Depending on the wait, sometimes he will toss the sandwich on the crepe griddle and let the cheese melt.

The sandwich is always amazing, but there is one downside. This Linus character spends a lot of time drinking at La Perle down the street and smoking copious amounts of pot. So despite what would seem like a pretty straightforward "Subway Sandwichesque" assembly process, each sandwich takes at least 10 minutes for this "sandwich artist" to build. Like watching a elderly relative with Alzheimer's open the same christmas present fourteen times, the steps to making the same sandwich never seem to register with Linus. I would suggest that if there are more than 3 people in line in front of you, to grab couscous from the next stand down.


John Talbott

blog John Talbott's Paris

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I believe it was on the recommendation of Clotilde from Chocolate & Zucchini that I tried Saigon Sandwich, an ordinary looking little sandwich place in Belleville that serves Bahn Mi, a Vietnamese sandwich. The shop itself may not be very inviting, but the sandwiches are delicious and it’s obvious that the owner considers sandwich making no small thing and is eager to tell all of the details that makes his sandwich that much better than your average shop (like hand cut carrots and homemade sauce) You can grab a sandwich, a coconut juice and head to the Parc de Belleville for a picnic lunch.

Saigon Sandwich

8 rue de la Présentation

75011 Paris


www.parisnotebook.wordpress.com

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John, I highly recommend the guy at the Enfant Rouge market for to-go sandwiches. My parents took three for the train ride between Paris and Florence and said they only got better with age.


Edited by BradenP (log)

"When planning big social gatherings at our home, I wait until the last minute to tell my wife. I figure she is going to worry either way, so I let her worry for two days rather than two weeks."
-EW

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My weekly sandwich place is in the Enfant Rouge market. There is a guy who looks like Linus (from the Peanuts cartoon) who has a stand in the second to last row. He slices the bread (which has a texture between sliced bread and baguette), adds a drizzle of olive oil, then continues with lettuce, marinated tomatoes, sauteed mushrooms, caramelized onions, chives, avocado, salt and pepper and your choice of jambon cru, rostello (roasted pork) or a sliced beef similar to bresaola. Finally a choice of and cantel or comte sliced generously over the top. Depending on the wait, sometimes he will toss the sandwich on the crepe griddle and let the cheese melt.

Oh my God, is this the same guy who makes the socca? The socca is to die for!!

I go there every week too!

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My weekly sandwich place is in the Enfant Rouge market. There is a guy who looks like Linus (from the Peanuts cartoon) who has a stand in the second to last row. He slices the bread (which has a texture between sliced bread and baguette), adds a drizzle of olive oil, then continues with lettuce, marinated tomatoes, sauteed mushrooms, caramelized onions, chives, avocado, salt and pepper and your choice of jambon cru, rostello (roasted pork) or a sliced beef similar to bresaola. Finally a choice of and cantel or comte sliced generously over the top. Depending on the wait, sometimes he will toss the sandwich on the crepe griddle and let the cheese melt.

The sandwich is always amazing, but there is one downside. This Linus character spends a lot of time drinking at La Perle down the street and smoking copious amounts of pot. So despite what would seem like a pretty straightforward "Subway Sandwichesque" assembly process, each sandwich takes at least 10 minutes for this "sandwich artist" to build. Like watching a elderly relative with Alzheimer's open the same christmas present fourteen times, the steps to making the same sandwich never seem to register with Linus. I would suggest that if there are more than 3 people in line in front of you, to grab couscous from the next stand down.

Was that you today at the marche, BradenP? With glasses? And a pink and blue striped shirt? And a friend? Obviously enough of a regular for Linus to say, "Pas de sandwich aujourd'hui, monsieur" as soon as he saw you?

At first I was thinking, "It couldn't be." But then the friend looked at what I was getting and said, "What is that?" And the person who might've been BradenP said, "It's socca."

Who would know that??

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Yup, I think that was me. Were you the one buying socca?


"When planning big social gatherings at our home, I wait until the last minute to tell my wife. I figure she is going to worry either way, so I let her worry for two days rather than two weeks."
-EW

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