Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create an account.

Sign in to follow this  
carpetbagger, esq.

Tex Mex And Mexican Cookbooks

Recommended Posts

Diana Kennedy, Rick Bayless- they are still the undisputed sources of lo mexicano. BTW, does anyone on your list read Spanish? If so, I have a big list!

Theabroma

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Diana Kennedy, Rick Bayless- they are still the undisputed sources of lo mexicano.  BTW, does anyone on your list read Spanish?  If so, I have a big list!

Theabroma

I took spanish for 5 years, and my gf majored in it while in college (and does translation work for a publishing company as a side gig). bring it!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Personally I like Mexico the Beautifull...its part of a series and they are all coffee table books but the recipes look damn authentic to me...who am I ? nobody ...but everything I made from it so far was good

unfortunatly I left it at a former job where I was asked to take a few days off till they called back with a new schedule....that was uhhh 8 months ago

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Diana Kennedy, Rick Bayless- they are still the undisputed sources of lo mexicano.  BTW, does anyone on your list read Spanish?  If so, I have a big list!

Theabroma

I second this motion. You can't go wrong with either or both of these.

I also like the variations developed by the Two Hot Tamales.

I enjoyed their shows on the Food Network and have had great success with recipes from their book.

I also like Rob Walsh's The Tex-Mex Cookbook. In addition to the many recipes that are often quite different from traditional Mexican recipes, he gives us a lot of history to explain the evolution of the recipes. It is an interesting read in addition to its source as a cookbook.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've heard that cookbooks by Jacqueline Higuera McMahan are quite good. "Rancho Cooking, Mexican and Californian Recipes" is the title of one of her books. It is more Mexican Californian (i.e. based on recipe from the Californios--the Mexicans who settled in California before the US acquired the area). I'm not sure if that still fits your criteria, but it sounds like an interesting book, nonetheless.

She does have some other Mexican/Southwestern books, and even a Mexican Breakfast book! Some seem to be out of print, though.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I find Patricia Quintana's books amazing--amazingly authentic and well researched regional recipes. The problem might be that they are not really meant for an American kitchen, even though many exist in English. The recipes respect tradition, which means they are labor intensive and feed an army.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I would suggest Modern Mexican Flavors by Richard Sandoval. It's not traditional Mexican recipes, it's more about Mexican food combined with French technique. I have found the recipes in that book to come out very very well.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I also like Rob Walsh's The Tex-Mex Cookbook.  In addition to the many recipes that are often quite different from traditional Mexican recipes, he gives us a lot of history to explain the evolution of the recipes.  It is an interesting read in addition to its source as a cookbook.

I'll second that book. It is a great read and does a great job of elevating Tex-Mex from the bastardized slop that Diana Kennedy makes it out to be, to what it really is, the regional cuisine of Texas and the Border.

Anything by Rick Bayless is great as are The Los Barrios Family Cookbook by Diana Barrios Trevino, A Gringo's Guide To Authentic Mexican Cooking by "Mad Coyote" Joe Daigneault and Nuevo Tex-Mex by David Garrido and (again) Rob Walsh.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

For a pretty good list of Texas cookbooks click here.

There is a used copy of "Texas on the Half Shell" by Phil Brittin And Joseph Daniel. This rare gem is extremly hard to come by. Just buy it.

Janet Jarvits Bookseller

(edited to include homepage)


Edited by marinade (log)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

1,000 Mexican Recipes by Marge Poore.

I have all the Kennedy and Bayless, a few from Zarela, and have read all of Quintana's; but this is probably the Mexican cookbook I would recommend just for the sheer volume of usable recipes.

I'd second the rec on Mexico the Beautiful, great coffee table book that is also quite practical.

However, if your collection is totally lacking in this area or if you are totally new to Mexican cooking, Diana Kennedy's The Essential Cuisines of Mexico is probably the one to own.

A few other good ones:

The Mexican Gourmet by Maria Dolores Torres Yzabal

Recipe of Memory by Victor Valle

Seasons of My Heart by Susana Trilling

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Sign in to follow this  

  • Similar Content

    • By boilsover
      Solid intermediate cook, here.  Not especially intimidated by elaborate preps.  But I'm new to SV, and would like a recommendation for a cookbook for guidance and exploration.
       
      I was thinking of Tom Keller's Under Pressure, but I'm wondering if the preps he includes may not be the most generally useful.  What do you all like, and why?
       
      Thanks!
    • By Chris Hennes
      On Nov. 7, 2017, Modernist Bread will finally arrive on my doorstep. Having preordered it literally the first day it was available, to say I'm excited about this book is a bit of an understatement. The team at The Cooking Lab have been gracious enough to give @Dave the Cook and me early electronic access to the book and so I've spent the last week pouring over it. I'm just going to start with a few initial comments here (it's 2600 pages long, so a full review is going to take some time, and require a bunch of baking!). Dave and I would also be happy to answer any questions you've got.
       
      One of the main things I've noticed about this book is a change in tone from the original Modernist Cuisine. It comes across as less "everything you know is wrong" and more "eighty bazillion other bakers have contributed to this knowledge and here's our synthesis of it." I don't think it's an exaggeration to say that Myhrvold and company are now the most experienced bread-bakers in the world. Not necessarily in terms of the number of identical loaves they've produced, but in the shear number of different recipes and techniques they've tried and the care with which they've analyzed the results. These volumes are a distillation of 100,000 years of human breadmaking experience, topped off with a dose of the Modernist ethos of taking what we know to the next level.
       
      The recipes include weight, volume, and baker's percentages, and almost all of them can be made by both a home baker and someone baking in a commercial facility. The home baker might need to compromise on shape (e.g. you can't fit a full-length baguette in most home ovens) but the book provides clear instructions for both the amateur and professional. The recipes are almost entirely concentrated in volumes 4 and 5, with very few in the other volumes (in contrast to Modernist Cuisine, where there were many recipes scattered throughout). I can't wait for the physical volumes to arrive so that I can have multiple volumes open at once, the recipes cross-reference techniques taught earlier quite frequently.
    • By Chris Hennes
      I just got a copy of Grace Young's "Stir-Frying to the Sky's Edge"—I enjoyed cooking from "Breath of a Wok" and wanted to continue on that path. Does anyone else have this book? Have you cooked anything from it?

      Here was dinner tonight:

      Spicy Dry-Fried Beef (p. 70)

      I undercooked the beef just a bit due to a waning propane supply (I use an outdoor propane-powered wok burner), but there's nothing to complain about here. It's a relatively mild dish that lets the flavors of the ingredients (and the wok) speak. Overall I liked it, at will probably make it again (hopefully with a full tank of gas).


    • By gulfporter
      Chiles en Nogada are traditionally served only for Mexican Independence Day (16 de Septiembre).  Every household and restaurant have their own version.  In years past we have eaten as many as 12 different versions in the course of the week long celebration.   Certain things about it never change: always poblanos, walnuts, pomegranate seeds and dried fruit (though the types of dried and fresh fruit vary as does the ratio of fruit to meat).  And the cream sauce is always room temperature, never heated.  
       
      Not only is it a tasty dish, it is about the prettiest meal ever put on a plate.  

       
      I have made them at home (but not for several years).   Rick Bayless's recipe is the one I used.  
      http://www.rickbayless.com/recipe/pork-and-fruit-stuffed-chiles-in-white-walnut-sauce/
       
      The history of the dish is one of creating a festive dish on the spur of the moment with limited ingredients. 
      https://www.tripsavvy.com/chiles-en-nogada-1588803
       
       
       
       
    • By Kasia
      My quesadilla
       
      Today I would like to share with you the recipe for a dish which meets holiday requirements. It is easy, and it doesn't need sophisticated ingredients or an oven. A frying pan is enough. Quesadilla, the dish in question, is a tortilla with melted cheese. The rest of the ingredients you choose at your discretion. Red beans, pepper, chorizo or fried meat all work brilliantly. I added fried pieces of turkey leg. Thanks to this, my dish could be a holiday dinner.

      Ingredients (for 2 people)
      4 tortillas
      300g of turkey leg
      half a chili pepper
      half an onion
      1 clove of garlic
      2 tablespoons of oil
      200g of tinned sweetcorn
      200g of tinned red beans
      fresh pepper
      200g of mozzarella cheese
      salt and pepper

      Cube the meat. Fry the diced onion, garlic and chili pepper in oil. Add the spiced-up-with-salt-and-pepper meat and fry on a low heat until the meat is soft. Cube the pepper. Drain the sweetcorn and red beans and slice the mozzarella cheese. Put the tortilla into a dry, heated pan. Arrange the meat, sweetcorn and red beans on it. Cover with the slices of the mozzarella cheese and the second tortilla. Fry on a low heat for a while. Turn it and fry a bit more until the cheese has melted. Put it on a plate and cut it into triangles.

      Enjoy your meal!
       
       
       

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×