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jsolomon

Whole beef heart

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I work at a land-grant University. Our Animal Science department offers USDA grading courses to students. So, all of that meat they grade goes somewhere--the Meat Sales store.

I was visiting there the other day, and picked up a boned lamb shoulder, some bacon, and a whole beef heart.

What the hell do I do with a whole beef heart? I'm tempted to thaw it, cube, sear, and braise in a stew. But, I'm welcoming all ideas.

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While I've never cooked beef heart, a local Peruvian restaurant trims, cubes, marinates it, threads the cubes on skewers and grills them medium rare. Wonderful, chewy, tasty beef. I believe the Peruvian name for the dish is anticucho.

Braising and roasting, stuffed or not, are other "popular" preps.

edit: Google search results for anticucho heart recipe


Edited by carswell (log)

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I was going to suggest the same thing. I had that dish a few days ago at a local Peruvian restaurant. Make sure to put plenty of cumin on the pieces of heart and grill until the strips of meat have a nice char but are still tender. I couldn't tell you how long that would be, as this is just the perspective of a diner who's had the dish.

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When I was a child my mother used to stuff the beef heart with a mixture made from bread cubes, sage, butter, onions, poultry seasoning (like a turkey ressing). I think she then baked it in the oven. I don't know how long it was baked or steamed, but it was wonderful.

It is one of my favorite childhood food memories. To this day I love turkey & chicken hearts and grab them befoe anyone else can get them :biggrin:

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first and foremost heart is probably my favorite part of a cow, lamb or pig or anything. i usually just salt pepper and grill it.

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While I've never cooked beef heart, a local Peruvian restaurant trims, cubes, marinates it, threads the cubes on skewers and grills them medium rare. Wonderful, chewy, tasty beef. I believe the Peruvian name for the dish is anticucho.

Braising and roasting, stuffed or not, are other "popular" preps.

edit: Google search results for anticucho heart recipe

That sounds like a good recipe, but, alas, I am in an ethnic wasteland known as Nebraska. Half of the spices called for in this dish, I can't find (I looked).

*sigh* Water, water everywhere, but not a drop to drink.

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Braise whole heart with onions, salt, pepper and whatever else you feel like. Cut into slices and fry in butter. Serve on top of mashed turnips.

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That sounds like a good recipe, but, alas, I am in an ethnic wasteland known as Nebraska.  Half of the spices called for in this dish, I can't find (I looked). 

My sympathies. Having spent too much of my life in small Midwestern towns, I know how frustrating it can be. As I mentioned upthread, I've never cooked anticucho. But that won't stop me from saying you could adapt the recipe and come up with a perfectly acceptable dish. After all, we're talking about a marinade; the beef remains the star of the show. See here for one possibility (replace the hontaka chiles with mirasols, serranos or what have you). The only exclusively ethnic ingredient is annato, which you could order from Penzey's for not much dinero or maybe even prevail on a fellow eGulleter to mail to you a teaspoons' worth of (I'd be happy to, though there might be trans-border issues).

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What I ended up doing was braising the butterflied heart in tomato juice with garlic and onions. Oven, 250 degrees for ~6 hours.

The braising liquid was beautiful.

Leftovers were sliced and browned for first serving--again delicious.

The remainder are going into goulash to use the final braising liquid and to use some leftover turkey stock.

Wow. It was good.

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How does beef heart flavor compare to poultry heart?

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Poultry (chicken, turkey) heart is very fibrous. Beef heart is more like a very good steak with some liver taste. At least, that's how it seemed to me when I ate a beef heart dish recently.

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How does beef heart flavor compare to poultry heart?

I've usually found them to be fairly similar. Pan is correct about the slight liver character in the flavor, but when poultry hearts are braised properly, they are quite lovely.

On the other side of the coin, both poultry hearts and beef hearts take well to very high heat methods.

Due to the specific nature of cardiac muscle, though, as well as having that delicious flavor of steaky-ness, they also have the unctuousness that a braised chuck or short-rib gets. They really are a lovely melding of two wonderful worlds.

But, remember, when you purchase a whole beef heart, it's going to be 4-5 pounds. That was my problem. It did make great goulash, though. Yum!

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I've used heart in combo with brisket for chili with good results.

I also smoked a heart over hickory once and was quite happy with the outcome.

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Going to give this a try. I found a half beef heart at the market for $1.99/lb. Cleaned it and sliced it then then marinated it for a couple of hours in OJ, white wine and garlic. I plan to grill it and put it over a salad of arugula and golden beets. Borrowed some components from Chris Consentino's site. Never worked with it before but watched the video of Chris cleaning one and then went to it. Had to clean it while my wife was still at work. If she had seen it there would be little chance she would try it.

beef heart.jpg

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That's a great idea to pair the heart with beets. Nice earthy flavors.

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Taste was good. Little if any mineral flavor. A touch chewy

I'm going to try braising next

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My go to with heart is beef jerky. The texture is great and it has a slight offal flavor when finished, but it isn't overwhelming. That said seared is great too, as long as it isn't overcooked and chewy. I like it fairly rare, any more and I find it gets rubbery.

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looks delish! I have one in the freezer, I'll take some of this here for inspiration.

Oh, and as a side note: Amazon delivers to any culinary wasteland on the planet, or at least most. Def Nebraska. As do others. Don't waste time looking all over town for some spice/ingredient, order it :-)

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looks delish! I have one in the freezer, I'll take some of this here for inspiration.

Oh, and as a side note: Amazon delivers to any culinary wasteland on the planet, or at least most. Def Nebraska. As do others. Don't waste time looking all over town for some spice/ingredient, order it :-)

Well actually, for food products, they deliver nowhere on the planet outside the US, Canada, Alaska, Hawaii and Puerto Rico. :wink:

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looks delish! I have one in the freezer, I'll take some of this here for inspiration.

Oh, and as a side note: Amazon delivers to any culinary wasteland on the planet, or at least most. Def Nebraska. As do others. Don't waste time looking all over town for some spice/ingredient, order it :-)

Well actually, for food products, they deliver nowhere on the planet outside the US, Canada, Alaska, Hawaii and Puerto Rico. :wink:

Why am I reminded of the baseball 'World' Series? >_>

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