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Tetsuya's


porkpa
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Does anyboy know the the web and/or email address for Tetsuyas restaurant in Sydney? My wife and I will be in Sydney in a month and would like to secure a reservation.

Porkpa

I would advise springing for the cost of a phone call.

From my experience they are often reserved MORE than a month in advance. As a restaurateur, when I receive a phone call for a reservation and the call is from overseas, I take it very seriously. I think it's much easier to say 'we're full' to a fax or email. Also I would be quite flexible with them about the time, and if they were full I would start in about being a serious foodie from eGullet. Tetsuya soaks up media stuff. I phoned a month ahead, was told they were full, but then said I was willing to come at any hour and they squeezed me in for an 11:30 AM lunch. It was well worth it. If you have time I would suggest enjoying a couple of meals there. I would if I could. I doubt you will find any better opportunity for great food. For my money Tetsuya is up there as one of the best chefs in the world (same league as Gagnaire, maybe better).

I've written about this in another thread, but I was lucky enough to spend some personal 'going-out time' with Tets. We went to a terrific Cantonese seafood specialist in Sydney's Chinatown, where Tets eats very often, like every night. Century is a fantastic place to sample Australia's world-standard seafood. Giant Australian Crabs, Mud Crabs, Lobsters, local Oysters, Barramundi, Morton Bay Bugs, Prawns, Baby Abalone are all available live here. Bring friends (to sample lots) and money. Big YUM.

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Don't despair. I got an evening dinner reservation about two weeks in advance, without even mentioning eGullet :wink: . I deliberately chose a Tuesday evening rather than Friday or Saturday. I agree with the tip about calling, but I did have to exchange faxes with the restaurant to authorize a credit card penalty of AU$50 for a no show. (No worries about that, because of course I'd phone to cancel if I couldn't make it.)

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  • 2 weeks later...

Another fine, fine meal at Tetsuya; and here's what we had:

Caviar and snow egg sandwich

Beetroot and Blood Orange Salad

Gazpacho with spiced Tomato Sorbet

Tartare of Tuna with Goat Curd and Wasabi

Marinated Filet of Kingfish with Orange and Soy Jelly

Tataki of Venison with Rosemary and Honey

West Australian Marron Salad with Asparagus

Tian of Soft Smoked Ocean Trout with Truffle

Tataki of Bonito with Orange and Essence of Shiso

Confit of Tasmanian Ocean Trout Loin with Kombu, Celery and Daikon (absolutely lovely, delicious, inspiring--a signature)

Green Salad

Lobster Ravioli with Shellfish Vinaigrette

Carpaccio of Scallop with Foie Gras and Lime (also an amazement)

Grilled Baramundi with Truffled Peaches and Bitter Green ( I have to agree with my friend who gripes that the farmed Barramundi is not as good as the wild--still very, very good)

Angel Hair Pasta with Scampi and Scampi Oil

Rolled Wagyu Beef with Asian Mushrooms and Citrus Juice

Roasted Breast of Squab with Chestnut Mushrooms and Buckwheat Risotto

Blood Peach Sorbet

Blue Cheese and Vanilla Bean Bavarois ( another signature--and wonderful beyond words)

Black Sesame Bavarois with Black Sesame Anglaise

Hazelnut Soup with Chocolate and Hazelnut Sorbet

Mocha Floating Island with Lemon Scented Anglaise

Coffee and Petit Fours

As always a top drawer dining experience from one of the world's most talented chefs.

abourdain

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Blue Cheese and Vanilla Bean Bavarois ( another signature--and wonderful beyond words)

Now Mr. Bourdain, I'm your biggest fan. Really and truly. But I tasted that bavaroise last year in Montreal when he was guest cheffing at a restaurant here and I'd rate it as one of the most vile things ever.

I wonder if you have to be at Tetsuya's to understand his cuisine. I ate many of those same signature dishes and I thought it was all pretty awful. He even brought a lot of those ingredients -- the trout, the Wagyu Beef-- with him, not to mention half his kitchen staff.

He's a very sweet, gentle man, and very articulate... but I just didn't get it.

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Lesley C. For whatever reason, Tetsuya seems to lose something on export. The businesses he's consulted to or helped set up abroad have disappointed many observers--and I have to agree with you about the Wagyu beef--unctuous to a fault and not a strong point. He's much much stronger on fish and birds, I think--not so on beef. But that bavarois thing really worked for me. The ocean trout was right up there with the classic Troisgros salmon with sorrel--and will, I hope enter the same realm of cherished dishes. I think he's one of the most signifigant figures on the culinary radar--and a must-visit when in Sydney.

abourdain

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The ocean trout dish was described as "signature" when it was served. My dining companion and I could detect no flavor whatsoever in the fish, although we liked the crust. None of which is to dispute Bourdain's view - heaven forbid - just to reflect on how people can leave a table with such a different take on the same meal.

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The ocean trout dish was described as "signature" when it was served.  My dining companion and I could detect no flavor whatsoever in the fish, although we liked the crust.  None of which is to dispute Bourdain's view - heaven forbid - just to reflect on how people can leave a table with such a different take on the same meal.

I was thinking about this Ocean trout thing. It is a farmed fish, which would normally mean that it wasn't as prized as the wild version. Yet this type of fish doesn't really exist outside of farming (yes, the steelhead is a ocean going rainbow trout, just like the Ocean Trout) could it be the first example of a true fish made for the restaurant trade? The flavour of salmon, with the texture of trout (flesh of any colour you should desire). In season all year round.

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The caviar and snow egg sandwich consisted of a shot glass, aubergine puree at the bottom, crumbled dry-ish snow eggs above, topped with a dollop of black caviar. Nice contrasts. (Didn't dine with Bourdain, I should explain, just ate the same menu on another occasion).

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  • 1 year later...

We had dinner at Tetsuya's earlier in the week, some of the dishes were excellent (the ocean trout with kombu was by far the best) others were simply good. We ordered a bottle of an older australian riesling with our first few courses, the staff was kind enough to evenly distribute the grit from the bottom of the bottle into both MsMelkor and my glasses evenly and for some reason felt the need to comment on the 'residual sugar' in the wine when she collected the chunk-coated empty glasses. The service overall was poor, the desserts were all excellent. Becasse was more consistant with the quality of their dishes and the service was far far better. Overall, I'd say Tetsuya's is worth visiting at least once, though I'm not sure I'm interested in returning.

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  • 4 months later...

My wife and I have just returned from Sydney where we had the pleasure of dining at Tetsuya's on 30 December 2004. The experience was world class in every way, beginning with the way we were greeted and seated. It was absolutely on a par with the Michelin 3 Star restaurants of Europe. :biggrin::biggrin:

Our original table was located near an adjoining table of 4 young children. The host immediately noticed the situation and offered us a table in another room. We gladly accepted.

We have dined in many fine restaurants throughout the world but have never encountered such a professional wine service program. Before taking our order the sommelier asked us a few questions about the types of wine we enjoy. He listened closely to our responses and then made a few suggestions. The descriptions were detailed and we selected a 2003 Amisfield Noble Riesling (New Zealand) and a 2001 Paringa Estate Pinot Noir. They were terrific! I did not know these wines beforehand and would not have selected them. Now, that is one professional sommelier.

The 8 course meal was superb, especially the Grilled Spring Bay Scallop with Wakame & Lemon, the Grilled Wagyu Beef with Asian Mushrooms, and Tamanian Ocena Trout Confit with Konbu, Daikon, and Fennel. The Spatchcock with Braised Daikon was the least interesting of the many dishes.

Anyone who loves dining at its finest should not miss Tetsuya's.

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i must do this restaurant!!

yes is'nt it good when a sommelier actually does his job. I too have had some very good experiences with sommeliers, and will rely on there recommendations. but good ones are far and few between.

as for the paringa... dont know what the 2001 tastes like, but you cant go wrong with that!! one of my favourite pinots in victoria (or oz for that matter)

cheers

ozmouse

melbourne

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  • 2 weeks later...

We also went to Tetsuya during the Christmas Holiday period and found the food there to be absolutely outstanding. My wife and I both had the degustation set menu. I consider New York to have the best restaurants, but Tetsuya is as good as any NY restaurant. If you love good food, this is a can't miss when in Sydney.

Incidentally, the person who started this thread asked if there was a website. Well, there is... http://www.tetsuyas.com/.

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  • 2 weeks later...

Dined last night.

Service was fantastic, relaxed but on the ball. Not pretentious.

Food was technically brilliant and executed absolutely without mistake.

David Pegrum is doing a seriously good job down there. One or two flavour combinations/choices that I thought were a little off base but obviously this is a subjective area. As I mentioned, on the technical side of things 110% so maybe my flavour journey preferences can take a back seat for the evening.

Too many favourites to mention. Go if you can.

Around $500 for two (we are only light drinkers), worth every cent.

When comparing to European restaurants of a comparible level, Tetsuya's is fair and reasonable value for money as well.

CHEF JOBS UPDATE - September 07 !!

Latest global Chef jobs listing and news now available!

Take a look online here:

http://www.hostec.com.au/newsletters/chef/sep07/

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Wish I could say the same of the Vue du Monde, where for $500 for two I thought I was sitting in the dining room of the Angliss roll-out class. Amateurish and plain arrogant. To quote a Bourdain piece, "Cooked by a person who'd never been fucked good."

"Coffee and cigarettes... the breakfast of champions!"

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  • 1 month later...

Walking to the gates outside Tetsuya’s, a thought briefly crossed my mind that maybe, just maybe, I wasn’t going to belong in this restaurant. The gates are like those that you might find outside an embassy, and as they opened and we walked through, I could see men in dinner suits and I was thinking that I wasn’t dressed appropriately. But I was also feeling that we were going somewhere very special. Not much fazes me when it comes to restaurants, but I was starting to remember the times I went to Stephanie’s and Mietta’s, a sense of excitement and intimidation. The staff welcomed us, they were all smiles, and they quickly took us to our table. There are a few rooms at Tetsuya’s, and we were given a table in a small room. It had no more than six tables, catering to around sixteen diners. We could see outside to a beautiful Japanese garden, and our table was next to a built in set of cabinets. Inside the glass doors were pieces of pottery. Interestingly, the doors were numbered, with certain numbers missing due to Japanese superstition.

The menu:

Snow egg sandwich with caviar

Me: Tasmanian Pacific oysters with ginger and rice vinegar

Me: Tartare of tuna on sushi rice with avocado

My fiancée: Roasted peppers on sushi rice with avocado

Me: Tuna marinated in soy and mirin

Trevally with preserved lemon

Cold corn soup with basil ice cream

My fiancée: Char grilled tuna with tomato and olive

Soy glazed chicken wing with wakame

Cold corn soup with basil ice-cream

Me: Confit of petuna Tasmanian ocean trout with konbu, daikon, and fennel

My fiancée: Grilled barramundi with dwarf truffled peaches and bitter greens

Seasonal green salad

Ravioli of lobster and crab with shellfish essence

Twice cooked de-boned spatchcock with braised daikon and bread sauce

Grilled wagyu beef with Asian mushroom and lime jus

Musk melon

Orange and honey sorbet with black pepper

Strawberry shortcake

Blue cheese ice-cream with pear and sauterne jelly

Floating island with praline and vanilla bean anglaise

My fiancée and I had slightly different dishes, as noted. She would have loved to have enjoyed the same food as I had, but for the time being, we had to be careful with what she’s eating.

I really don’t want to go through the menu, dish by dish. Needless to say, the food was stunningly well executed. But I saw the evening as a journey on the possibilities of food. From the ridiculous simplicity of a slice of melon (a nice change from the sorbets many restaurants give to diners to refresh their palates) to the taste and structural brilliance of the confit of petuna Tasmanian ocean trout, the traditional oyster with a sauce (in this case ginger and rice vinegar) to the challenging blue cheese ice cream, you can only sit back and admire Wakuda’s mastery of his art. We did notice that a few diners set aside the odd dish, and for me, I wasn’t too endeared with the overly sweet floating island dessert. In many dishes, the tastes didn’t hit you right away, but instead, there was a far more satisfying slow opening up of flavour.

As strange as it may seem, but the one thing I remember the most about the dinner was the truffled butter. I have had truffles once before, and that was one thin slice amongst a dish of wild French mushrooms. Amongst my kid in a candy store joy over the mushrooms, I didn’t get the appeal of truffles. I have had truffle oil on dishes, but the flavour was too subtle for me to pick up. But here, I finally understood why people revere this food. Isn’t it ridiculous? Amongst all the joy of the food served at Tetsuya’s, my favourite was the bread and butter.

Daniel Chan aka "Shinboners"
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  • 4 weeks later...

We have just returned from Oz & Asia

Trip to Tetsuyas on the 30 March

Fantastic, 3 diners, 3 Truffled butters...! sublime

One of our group knew the guys who supplys some of the wine so we got some

excellent, good value recommendations from the sommiliear

The menu was pretty much the same as Shinboners, we had a couple of extra dishes(i dont have the menu with me today)

The fish courses were all amazing

We really enjoyed the corn soup and basil ice cream

Also the Blue cheese dessert was a taste revalation.

One dessert we had with Cannellini beans,coffee and a jelly substance was a bit savoury/sweet for me..

With aperetifs,oyster supplement white, red, dessert wine,tip £113 a head...

Well worth the visit

Even did some star spotting, saw Micheal Stipe who was dining with REM there...

:biggrin:

Sarah x

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  • 2 months later...

Just want to add that we visited Sydney last Dec and dined at Tetsuya and it was one of the best food we ever had, better than anything we have here in Toronto, Canada (where I live) and as good, if not better, then the best of New York (where we frequently visit). And compare to New York prices, Tetsuya was not that expensive for what you're getting. So if you're in Sydney and love food, Tetsuya is a must try.

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Twice cooked de-boned spatchcock with braised daikon and bread sauce

I understand "spatchcock" to be a procedure for taking out the backbone from a fowl and flattening the rest of the bird out. Was this referring to a specific kind of bird here or just the technique? Either way, I would be curious to hear more about the bird.

It looks as if you had a wonderful meal, although nothing seems to have broken new ground. Of course, that is not necessary for a great meal. This restaurant certainly intrigues me and if I ever find myself fortunate enough to be in Sydney, I will make a point of dining there.

John Sconzo, M.D. aka "docsconz"

"Remember that a very good sardine is always preferable to a not that good lobster."

- Ferran Adria on eGullet 12/16/2004.

Docsconz - Musings on Food and Life

Slow Food Saratoga Region - Co-Founder

Twitter - @docsconz

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I understand "spatchcock" to be a procedure for taking out the backbone from a fowl and flattening the rest of the bird out. Was this referring to a specific kind of bird here or just the technique? Either way, I would be curious to hear more about the bird.

Over here, spatchcock is another term for poussin - a chicken that is slaughtered at 3 to 4 weeks old.

Daniel Chan aka "Shinboners"
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Just want to add that we visited Sydney last Dec and dined at Tetsuya and it was one of the best food we ever had, better than anything we have here in Toronto, Canada (where I live) and as good, if not better, then the best of New York (where we frequently visit).  And compare to New York prices, Tetsuya was not that expensive for what you're getting.  So if you're in Sydney and love food, Tetsuya is a must try.

We were at Tetsuya's a couple of months ago and it didn't make our best 10 meals. Wasn't even our best Australian! Tired, repetitive and expensive!

Must get around to finishing my partially prepared review of the trip.

Have had several better meals in Toronto and many better meals in NY.

Stay tuned.

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