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Are there an English written recipes for delightful fast food stuffed pancake?

thanks

:biggrin:

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Are there an English written recipes for delightful fast food stuffed pancake?

thanks

:biggrin:

try this http://www.galaxylink.com.hk/~john/food/co...akligozleme.htm

I just Google 'gozleme recipe' quite a lot came out, there are a few mentions in my cookbooks but no recipe.

there is a recipe for it in nevin halici's latest book: sufi cuisine, p 135. according to nevin, gozleme is eaten as borek when it is filled and folded over in a half moon. there is a recipe for that version in my med street food book(see saj borek). i adapted the recipe from one of nevin's in her turkish cookbook. she is a great writer and her books are definitely worth getting, if you don't have them that is.

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One outstanding gozleme comes from the town of Mersin, It is stuffed wtih

a combination of ground toasted sesame seeds and crushed sauteed onions.

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One outstanding gozleme comes from the town of Mersin, It is stuffed wtih

a combination of ground toasted sesame seeds and crushed sauteed onions.

do you have any recipe ? The toasted sesame seeds, would that be like toastier tasting tahini or can you substitute tanini ? thanks

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One outstanding gozleme comes from the town of Mersin, It is stuffed wtih

a combination of ground toasted sesame seeds and crushed sauteed onions.

do you have any recipe ? The ground toasted sesame seeds, would that be like toastier tasting tahini or can you substitute tanini ? thanks

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It wasn't tahini paste, but it a blend of crushed and whole toasted sesame seeds combined with chopped sauteed onions. I didn't get a recipe but I still remember it as best of all gozlemes I've ever tasted.

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Great quick gozleme we had recently was filled with tahini and honey. I'll bet it would have been even better with some sesame seeds or walnuts sprinkled inside.

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Great quick gozleme we had recently was filled with tahini and honey. I'll bet it would have been even better with some sesame seeds or walnuts sprinkled inside.

I just made one, using Turkish prepared phyllo (yufka) which is a bit moister and thicker than the typical american product, with bittersweet chocolate and a bit of orange marmelade. Crisp and brown and buttery on the outside, with a softer dough layer, and then inside.... :rolleyes:

I'm going to have to try the tahini one..

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Great quick gozleme we had recently was filled with tahini and honey. I'll bet it would have been even better with some sesame seeds or walnuts sprinkled inside.

I just made one, using Turkish prepared phyllo (yufka) which is a bit moister and thicker than the typical american product, with bittersweet chocolate and a bit of orange marmelade. Crisp and brown and buttery on the outside, with a softer dough layer, and then inside.... :rolleyes:

I'm going to have to try the tahini one..

Yeah! I had one of those few weeks ago prepared by Turkish people at one of the night markets. Could not finish it by myself it was delicious but too moorish.

On the other hand Uzbeks call yufka yupka but then again in their neck of the woods the meaning is pancake

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They have same in Uzbekistan???

Sorry I was referring to the yufka or yupka

and yes Uzbeks speak one of the variants of Turkic languages although Russian is widely spoken across all ethnic groups.


Edited by piazzola (log)

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Reviving an old topic! I know nothing about gözleme other than what I have been told and the multitude of recipes available on the Internet. I have been to Turkey a couple of times and never come across a gözleme vendor. Most of the recipes on the Internet appear to be a variation of one source in Australia - apparently gözleme are very popular there at the moment and, I am told, they have a large Turkish population.

 

So, I am trying to find a recipe for the dough. The only recipe I have found that actually comes from a Turkish chef, has yeast in the dough. But, I have been told by non-Turkish folk (let's lay my cards on the table - the non-Turkish folk are Australian) that the Turk's do not use yeast! 

 

So, my question to those who actually know, is: Is the dough made with yeast or not?!?! I am not looking for a recipe from some cookbook writer who has written a recipe but has never actually been to Turkey or has a recipe "adapted from . . . . .".  I am looking for the pukka thing. Any takers?

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Thanks for the reply @cakewalk. That is now the second YT video made by a Turk that says the dough is un-leaven. From the bit of research I have done, it appears that there are regional differences in how they make the dough and the method of cooking it. Let's see if anybody else has some guidance in the making of this so called "street food". The main one I have come across appears to be baby spinach mixed with a bit of onion and feta. Some appear to be cooked on a flat griddle whilst others on a slightly convex cooking iron over an open fire.

 

I found it interesting that I have been to a few small villages and towns in Turkey and never come across gözleme. Other folk I have spoken to have told me they were freely available as street food in the cities. It also appears that they are cut into smaller rectangles and sold with a good squeeze of lemon juice. My SIL, who is visiting from Sydney, says they are all the rave in the street food scene over there and served with a few different fillings - none sweet as I have found on some of my internet searching.   

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