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chewy chocolate cookies


jayhay
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^CanadianBakin'...could you take a look at the recipe Patrick S posted? I'm assuming the website is perhaps wrong in naming that particular recipe the CIA Mudslide cookie recipe, since you have the book. (The recipes are quite different.)

The sugar content in a recipe usually doesn't really matter to me...I can always scale it down to my tastes.  I scaled the sugar in the Bittersweet Deception cookies down to 1/3 cup, and only used 1 cup of chopped walnuts. I'll try the recipe you posted next!

Wow! That recipe is way different. 7 eggs for 24 cookies seems a bit much. I don't have time this morning but I'll double check with the original later on today. I could even post the original amounts and then you can decide for yourself how many to make.

I hesitate to adjust sugar because of how it might affect the end result. I mean, as far as tenderizing, adding crisp, etc. Come to think of it, my mom always reduced the sugar. I guess after making the original I could always try again with reduced sugar. I just like to see how the creator of the recipe intended it to be. ...there's nothing wrong with MORE cookies!! :biggrin:

Don't wait for extraordinary opportunities. Seize common occasions and make them great. Orison Swett Marden

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Mudslide Cookies

2 oz unsweetened chocolate

6 oz bittersweet chocolate

1 oz butter

2 large eggs

6 oz white sugar

2 gr vanilla

2 gr coffee extract (I think I used about 1 tsp espresso powder & 1 tsp water)

1 oz pastry flour

2-1/2 gr baking powder

1 gr salt

1-1/4 oz pecans

4-1/2 oz chocolate chips

I chilled the dough to get it firmed up a bit, then rolled it and froze it for a few hours. Cut off 1/2" slices and baked.

Here's a half recipe of jgarner53's recipe

2-1/4 oz unsweet

4-1/2 oz bittersweet

2 oz butter

2 eggs

1-1/2 Tb espresso powder

6 1/8 oz sugar

1 oz pastry flour

1/8 tsp bp

1/8 tsp salt

4 oz bittersweet, chopped

They are VERY close. Basically just a bit less chocolate and a bit more butter. It will be interesting to see how that makes a difference.

Edited by CanadianBakin' (log)

Don't wait for extraordinary opportunities. Seize common occasions and make them great. Orison Swett Marden

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^Yeah, that's what I said upthread. :smile: Bit less chocolate, bit more butter. Both are good...I think I like the Bittersweet Deception ones a little bit more, b/c they have nuts.

I've heard that scaling down sugar may affect the results b/c sugar functions as a liquid ingredient...but I've never had a recipe turn out horribly wrong after I scale down the sugar a bit, so I guess I'll be a rebel and keep doing it... :laugh:

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The CIA book definitely says 7 eggs for 24 cookies. I won't make that recipe again. The Chocolate Deception cookie that Ling posted is the thickness I'm looking for.

The picture I posted was of jgarner's recipe.

Click on the link for Patrick's picture of his Bittersweet Deception cookies. :smile:

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Here's mine. They are chewy and very chocolaty. I made it up because spouse doesn't like unnecessary fats. "Unnecessary" being defined as anything except chocolate or nuts. The trick is not to overbake.

Low Fat Chocolate Cookies

2 C confectioners sugar

1/2 C dutch cocoa

pinch salt

1/2 tsp baking powder (if you use regular cocoa, I think you can substitute baking soda)

1 egg white

1/2 tsp vanilla

1/3 C bittersweet chocolate, chopped small (optional)

1/3 C sliced almonds (don't need to pre-toast)

Stir dry ingredients. Add egg white, then add vanilla. Add optional chocolate chips. Chill in fridge at least 1 hour.

Scoop into 1.5 Tbs portions on parchment paper. Sprinkle with sliced almonds. Bake 350F 11-12 minutes. Don't overbake. Cool on rack 5 minutes, then flip everything upside down (the cookies will stick to the parchment), then slowly peel the parchment off the cookies. Cool completely.

He who distinguishes the true savor of his food can never be a glutton; he who does not cannot be otherwise. --- Henry David Thoreau
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OK, here's the full recipe for CIA's Mudd Slide Cookies. This is out of The Professional Chef, The Culinary Institute of America, 7th Edition. Copyright 2002.

makes 12 dozen cookies (2-1/2 oz/75 g per cookie)

2 lb/900 g unsweetened chocolate

6 lb/2.75 kg bittersweet chocolate

1 lb/450 g butter

32 eggs

6 lb/2.75 kg sugar

1 oz/30 g coffee extract

1 oz/30 g vanilla extract

1 lb/450 g cake flour

1-1/2 oz/40 g baking powder

1/2 oz/15 g salt

1 lb 5 oz/600 g walnuts

4 lb 8 oz/2 kg chocolate chips

This is word for word out of the textbook so I've gotta think this one is correct. I don't know whose the other recipe is.

It might be easier for weighing to get it down to a 4 egg recipe so here's the reduced weights:

should make 18 - 2-1/2 oz Mudd Slide Cookies (if I've done my math right :biggrin:)

4 oz/113 g unsweetened chocolate

12 oz/344 g bittersweet chocolate

2 oz/56 g butter

4 eggs

12 oz/344 g sugar

1/8 oz/4 g coffee extract

1/8 oz/4 g vanilla extract

2 oz/56 g cake flour

3/16 oz/5 g baking powder

1/16 oz/2 g salt

2-5/8 oz/75 g walnuts

9 oz/250 g chocolate chips

The method in the linked recipe is close but not quite, so here's the correct method.

1. Finely chop the chocolates and melt with butter over barely simmering water. Set aside.

2. Beat eggs, sugar, coffee extract, vanilla extract on high for 5 mintues.

3. Sift together flour, baking powder, salt and blend into egg mix. Add nuts and chips and stir just till blended.

4. Roll into log and wrap in parchment. (I found I had to chill the dough first) Freeze or chill until needed.

5. Cut into 2-1/2 oz slices and bake on parchment-lined sheets at 350F for 14 minutes. Can be stored for 1 week.

Edited by CanadianBakin' (log)

Don't wait for extraordinary opportunities. Seize common occasions and make them great. Orison Swett Marden

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  • 2 weeks later...

Here's a recipe for a chewy chocolate cookie that has a texture similar to traditional snickerdoodles:

Chewy Chocolate Pixies

You can add some instant espresso powder if you like, and/or chocolate chips. Be sure to allow time for the dough to chill. The unbleached flour adds to the chewiness of the cookies.

Melt together in a microwave until the chocolate is almost melted, then stir with a fork until it is all melted and smooth, and set it aside:

4 ounces unsw. choc.

1/4 cup unsalted butter

Beat on high speed for 3 minutes til light, thick, and smooth:

2 cups granulated sugar

4 large eggs

1 cup confectioners' sugar

Scrape the bowl, add, and beat for 20-30 seconds:

2 teaspoons vanilla extract

1 teaspoon baking soda

1/2 teaspoon cream of tartar

1/2 teaspoon salt

On low speed, add the melted chocolate and butter.

Add in on low speed just until evenly mixed:

2-1/2 cups AP unbleached flour

The dough is very loose. Spread it into a shallow pan, cover, and chill for 2 hours or overnight. It will keep in the fridge like this for 4 or 5 days. When you are ready to bake, preheat a convection oven to 310 or a conventional oven to 325. Place 1 cup of confectioners' sugar into a shallow bowl. Drop the dough by 2-tablespoonfuls (#40 scoop) into the sugar and place onto parchment-lined baking sheets. These will spread, so keep them about 3 inches apart. Bake for 14 to 18 minutes. They will rise and then fall, and will no longer look wet, but will still feel soft when touched lightly with your finger. Do not overbake. Cool on wire racks.

Hope that helps.

Eileen

Eileen Talanian

HowThe Cookie Crumbles.com

HomemadeGourmetMarshmallows.com

As for butter versus margarine, I trust cows more than chemists. ~Joan Gussow

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A fellow Egulleter gave me a plate of Thomas Haas' Sparkle cookies two days ago, so I was reminded of the recipe. I've had them at Sen5es a few times in the past, but they are pretty pricey, so I'm going to make them at home from now on.

The person who gave them to be noted that he used Baker's the first time, and the cookies didn't turn out (rather flat, didn't taste all that remarkable). The second batch (of which I was a happy recipient!) was made with Valrhona Guanaja, which Thomas Haas recommends. The baker found the difference extraordinary, so be sure to use the best chocolate you can get with this recipe! :smile:

tharrison posted this in Recipe Gullet:

Chocolate Sparkle cookies

The cookies are very rich and chewy, but have that delicious bit of crunch from being rolled in sugar before baking. I love them! :wub:

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I've made a recipe that's supposed to be Haas' sparkle cookie, it too had almond flour in it's ingredients and I don't think it comes close to replicating Haas's cookie. You can imediately detect the almond flour in recipes you find published......by mouth feel. Where as, when you've had one of the real ones from his shop fresh out of the oven or cold, there absolutely isn't a grainly almond flour texture at all.

I've come across two recipes that come much closer to Haas' sparkle cookie. One was published in Martha Stewarts newer magazine, they call it something like 'the auesome chocolate cookie' or 'the incredible chocolate cookie' (and it is). It's very close to a flourless chocolate cookie but it does have just the smallest amount of flour. If you roll that in the sparkling sugar and eat it warm it's pretty close to Haas' sparkle cookie. Then theres a similar cookie call soho globs (I can't think of the author off the top of my head tonight). The only real difference is that recipe adds coffee to the almost flourless cookie, but it's still excellent.

BUT of course.........I'm way off topic because theres nothing chewie about those chocolate cookies. Actually, I don't think I've ever eaten a chewie chocolate cookie. I can't even think of one made commercially, can you?

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The dreamist chewy chocolate cookie I've ever eaten was actually at Sen5es bakery in Vancouver. I think I waxed philosophical on them last year, in fact. They used to be called Valrhona chocolate cookies, but now they're called Cacoa Barry chocolate cookies. They are soft, dense, chewy, dark and luscious. They have chocolate chips in them, too. I've tried a million recipes trying to get to where they've gotten, and have been failing - I did Julia's version, Fran's, and a few others. Maybe I should try those sliders....

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I've made a recipe that's supposed to be Haas' sparkle cookie, it too had almond flour in it's ingredients and I don't think it comes close to replicating Haas's cookie. You can imediately detect the almond flour in recipes you find published......by mouth feel. Where as, when you've had one of the real ones from his shop fresh out of the oven or cold, there absolutely isn't a grainly almond flour texture at all.

Was the recipe you tried the one in Recipe Gullet? The cookies I got from another Egulleter didn't have a distinctive almond meal texture, but I'll ask him which recipe he used. :smile:

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BUT of course.........I'm way off topic because theres nothing chewie about those chocolate cookies. Actually, I don't think I've ever eaten a chewie chocolate cookie. I can't even think of one made commercially, can you?

Exactly! I'm reading this thread and thinking "I thought we were looking for chewy?". The sparkle cookies are soft and fudgy. I think mudslides are fudgy too.

As for what I think people classify as chewy, my guess is something like the chocolate crinkle cookie or the Hershey's chewy chocolate cookie. A cookie that is medium to thin thickness, crispy around the edges, soft but has a bit of pull to it. But even cookies classified as chewy aren't really chewy.

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