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weinoo

Roasted Coffee Beans in Paris

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Any guidance on coffee roasters/sellers in Paris for our upcoming trip would be well appreciated...I thought I read about one near Odeon, but can't remember the name.

Merci.

There is a place near Odeon, on rue Saint Andre des Arts. I think it's called Melangro or something to that effect. If you walk down St. Andre des Arts towards Saint Michel it will be on the left.

One of the most famous and best places to buy coffee is Verlet on rue Saint Honore in the 1st. It's a cafe as well so you can sample any of the coffees they sell.


www.parisnotebook.wordpress.com

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There are certainly a lot of places in Paris to buy good coffee; you have not mentioned what quartier you will be near... One easy choice is La Grande Epicerie, the fabulous food store connected with Bon Marché. this is on rue de Sèvres, in the far reaches of the 7th. Then, of course, there is a good selection in Hédiard, and a little less so Fauchon;

But the top store for coffee in Paris is a little place in the 8th, Faguais. The original wood floors and the aroma of the coffee will captivate you. All the coffee here is personally selected by the family.

Faguais

30, rue de la Trémoille

(8th Arr.)

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Verlet, Cafe Amazone, and Le Comptoir Richard all have excellent coffee.

I am partial to cafe amazone, which is a tiny shop run by an old guy who did all the raosting himself in a old roaster.


chez pim

not an arbiter of taste

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Thanks, Pim, for the recommendation about Cafe Amazone - stopped by on our first afternoon in Paris, and had my beans for the following week. Great looking little shop, and the gentleman pulls a fine espresso.


Mitch Weinstein aka "weinoo"

mweinstein@eGstaff.org

Tasty Travails - My Blog

My eGullet FoodBog - A Tale of Two Boroughs

Was it you baby...or just a Brilliant Disguise?

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I want to find a present to bring back from Paris for a French friend, now living in the States. I know that she loves French coffee, but I want it to be a surprise so I can't ask her directly. Which are the best shops in Paris now specializing in fresh roasted coffee beans?

Since I don't drink the stuff, I confess to complete ignorance of the subject.

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Rather than start a new thread, I'll post mine here:

Do you know where I could find either an online shop or one in Annecy/Annecy-le-Vieux/Veyrier du Lac which sells just roasted coffee beans?

In the UK I was fortunate enough to find a fantastic website (now defunct, they have switched to selling shoes?!) which roasted the beans to order and dispatched them first class, ensuring a steady supply of wonderfully aromatic caffeine. My lazyness made me switch to the market guy in Cambridge who serves decent if somewhat staler beans at an acceptable price. Switching back to internet next year. Honest.

I have come here and my parents drink the same terrible Robusta coffee mentioned earlier on this thread and others. I am trying to convert them. Last summer I convinced them to buy a grinder, but they just bought overroasted, stale beans by the kilo and are still making the same terrible coffee.

I just bought 250g of Columbian beans for 5 euros in a town centre shop selling loads of machinery. It's a medium roast (on the strong side) but has been sitting about for at least a week or two. But I would love to find a place where they could source cheaply some beans of simple Columbian coffee roasted recently and to a mild or medium level only.

Thank you in advance.

R.

edit - similarly, if you know where to find some decent 15yo+ Pu-Erh, either in Annecy, online or Paris, please do let me know!


Edited by Roger le goéland (log)

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edit - similarly, if you know where to find some decent 15yo+ Pu-Erh, either in Annecy, online or Paris, please do let me know!

L'Empire des thés on avenue d'Ivry has some pretty good aged cooked pu-erh. Most tea supposedly older than 10 years or so found elsewhere in Paris is likely to be falsified, as pu-erh often is. L'Empire des thés are reliable. They have a 10-year-old cooked pu-erh that I recommend. Green pu-erh (brick or bing cha) is rather hard to find in Paris.

Addresses here.

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edit - similarly, if you know where to find some decent 15yo+ Pu-Erh, either in Annecy, online or Paris, please do let me know!

L'Empire des thés on avenue d'Ivry has some pretty good aged cooked pu-erh. Most tea supposedly older than 10 years or so found elsewhere in Paris is likely to be falsified, as pu-erh often is. L'Empire des thés are reliable. They have a 10-year-old cooked pu-erh that I recommend. Green pu-erh (brick or bing cha) is rather hard to find in Paris.

Addresses here.

I know La Maison des Trois Thes have (alledgedly) very old pu-erhs. I would say they are reliable too, based on the reputation of their owner, but I really don't know anything about tea... At least not enough to pretend to be able to distinguish vintages.

Oh and they're super expensive, too.

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I don't know much about pu-erh either (other than it's delicious). It's for a Chinese acquaintance.

Thanks for the recommendations, will try them and report back.

Any ideas re: online coffee shop?

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So far this is the only e-shop I've found selling beans they've just roasted, delivery within 48h (so they claim):

http://www.graindecafe.com/boutique_cafe.htm

Nous nous efforçons

également de torréfier votre café le jour de l'expédition pour une garantie 'fraîcheur'.

(roast on the day of sending for freshness)

I firmly believe the origin of the coffee doesn't matter a tenth as much as how well and how soon it was roasted.

I will give it a try and report back. I was considering starting my own shop (selling cheap Columbian beans roasted to order and also cheap blade grinders which should allow the layman to substantially improve their coffee experience).

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I know La Maison des Trois Thes have (alledgedly) very old pu-erhs. I would say they are reliable too, based on the reputation of their owner, but I really don't know anything about tea... At least not enough to pretend to be able to distinguish vintages.

Oh and they're super expensive, too.

If you want genuine Yunnan pu-erh I do not recommend La Maison des Trois Thés, especially if it's for a Chinese acquaintance (who could find better pu-erh in China or HK than they could ever find in Paris at the moment).

I know about them but I did not mention them above.

Buying a little loose pu-erh at Mariage Frères could be OK, it is a tea that needs aging anyway. Not much can happen to it that hasn't happened before and I rather trust Mariage's sourcing for pure origin teas.

I would stick to Kawa/L'Empire des Thés (same owners) and cautiously stay away from most of the others.

Coffee: there is quite a few good places for roasted coffee beans in Paris, Brûlerie des Gobelins, Brûlerie Maubert, Brûlerie des Ternes, Méo, Malongo, Hédiard, Verlet, etc. The coffee department at La Grande Epicerie is good too.


Edited by Ptipois (log)

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On my last trip to Paris I saw a small coffee shop with what looked like fresh beans on Rue Saint-Lazare, a few doors down from the Centre Commerciale du Passage du Havre, near Gare St Lazare. Anyone know it?

I'll be in the 9th between Places Clichy and Blanche for a few weeks in winter and this seems to be the closest place.

Any advice appreciated.

Cheers! :cool:

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I'm looking for a coffee bean purveyor in the 10th or nearabouts. We're on the Canal St Martin near Hotel Du Nord. I've seen recs for Amazone, Verlet and Comptoir Richard, but is there nothing in my neck of the woods?

Cheers

Kirsten

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I'm looking for a coffee bean purveyor in the 10th or nearabouts. We're on the Canal St Martin near Hotel Du Nord. I've seen recs for Amazone, Verlet and Comptoir Richard, but is there nothing in my neck of the woods?

Cheers

Kirsten

Even if there isn't, a few of the above can't be more than 20 or 30 minutes by metro or even walking.


Mitch Weinstein aka "weinoo"

mweinstein@eGstaff.org

Tasty Travails - My Blog

My eGullet FoodBog - A Tale of Two Boroughs

Was it you baby...or just a Brilliant Disguise?

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I'm looking for a coffee bean purveyor in the 10th or nearabouts. We're on the Canal St Martin near Hotel Du Nord. I've seen recs for Amazone, Verlet and Comptoir Richard, but is there nothing in my neck of the woods?

Cheers

Kirsten

Even if there isn't, a few of the above can't be more than 20 or 30 minutes by metro or even walking.

Yes, yes, but what you're forgetting is I'm the laziest person in the world...

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I'm looking for a coffee bean purveyor in the 10th or nearabouts. We're on the Canal St Martin near Hotel Du Nord. I've seen recs for Amazone, Verlet and Comptoir Richard, but is there nothing in my neck of the woods?

Cheers

Kirsten

Even if there isn't, a few of the above can't be more than 20 or 30 minutes by metro or even walking.

Yes, yes, but what you're forgetting is I'm the laziest person in the world...

It's not exactly next door, but I stopped by Goumanyat, which is near Republique, on a walk from the Canal and while they are not a coffee roaster, they do sell whole beans and will grind them for you. This is a store definitely worth visiting, from any arrondissement. They have an amazing array of interesting spices, sugars, salts, oils, vinegars and other things cooking related. They had many things I have never seen in any other store. Definitely worth the walk, even for the laziest person in the world :smile:


www.parisnotebook.wordpress.com

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