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Rendering Lard


derricks
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II should have followed Andiesenji's instructions more carefully. I think my lard got cooked a little too much--it's awfully brown! But I don't care. It's going to be used for savoury applications, anyway, so it doesn't matter to me that it might taste a little more porky.

I've got tons of large-ish crispy bits left, too. I used a wee bit to make some chicken fried rice. It's good. But I'm not sure what to do with the rest of them. I don't want to throw them away, but how much fried pork fat can a girl eat? OK, I could eat a lot, but I shouldn't. . .

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  • 2 months later...

I rendered about 7 lbs pf lard today (about half the fat i got from the recent purchase of half a pig). It took about 3.5 hours and not sure i "cooked" it all the way. the port fat pieces never got super crispy, though i managed to get out almost 3 liters of lard. I have three questions - Do you think I went too far with the first batch of lard? I think it might be a little too porky for pastry..

lard1.jpg compared to

2ndlard.jpg

What do you think?

Next, once the oil made its way to about 320 degrees, all the sizzling basically stopped and it just sat. I let it do this for 45 minutes or so before finally calling it quits. I figure I got enough lard out of it, but hsould i have let it go for longer?

Finally, how are you storing this? I plan to put both lard batches into the fridge to solidify and then throw most of it in a bag and vacuum seal it and throw it in the freezer for the future. The rest will go in the fridge. How are you portioning it? Thanks

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Finally, how are you storing this? I plan to put both lard batches into the fridge to solidify and then throw most of it in a bag and vacuum seal it and throw it in the freezer for the future. The rest will go in the fridge. How are you portioning it? Thanks

I portion out rendered fat (and all liquids, actually) into rectangular pint or quart containers, freeze solid, then pop out the plug and vacuum seal. Makes freezer organization easier.

 

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  • 1 year later...

Big bump!

I picked up half a pig yesterday, and I'm about to render the fat. Thanks to all who came before for showing me how to proceed. One question: is there any reason to keep the fat from the different parts of the pig separate? Does leaf lard, say, have different qualities from back lard? I'm just curious.

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  • 3 weeks later...

I'm not going to start a new topic but I do want to note how I render bacon to replenish my supply of "drippings" or whatever you want to call it.

I did a brief Google search and only saw methods which are essentially frying the bacon.

That is not my preferred way, nor how I learned from the cooks in my family.

I use a lot of bacon grease in cooking, more than I would have with just my occasional use of regular bacon.

I buy these 3-pound packages of Bacon Ends & Pieces.

Some is sliced, some is quite thick and chunky.

Ends & pieces.JPG

I start with a large skillet - 12 inches at least - add water to 1/2 inch depth.

Bring to a boil and add bacon so the bottom of the pan is fully covered, or a bit more.

Boiling bacon.JPG

This cooks over medium high heat occasionally turning or stirring the bacon (if in small pieces) until the water has completely evaporated.

No more water.JPG

closeup.JPG

At this point I reduce the heat and continue cooking the bacon until it has just begun to take on a bit of color.

The bacon is transferred to a paper towel to drain, the fat is strained into a container

grease can.JPG

and water is added to the skillet to start the next batch.

The bacon is fully cooked but still tender so it is perfect to add to dishes that will be further cooked, such as beans, etc., or it can quickly be crisped if desired.

Fully cooked.JPG

And this is the bacon fat extracted from half the package about 1 1/2 cups - I will be rendering the remaining half shortly.

bacon grease.JPG

"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett

 

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  • 3 months later...

Hi all --

Ok, so its pie season, and I wanted to try a leaf-lard crust. My local butcher gave me ALOT (6.8 pounds!) of leaf lard to render. This stuff is nearly pure white -- long pieces with zero meat on them. I did the first batch using andiesenj's method (in the crockpot). Crockpot worked great, and I pulled off the first batch of melted stuff -- which had been cooking for the least amount of time -- to use for pastry. Now it is in the fridge and is snow white.

But here's the question. When I smell it? Definitely porky. Will my pie taste porky? Its hard for me to believe it won't... I used the hydrodgenated lard from the store for a pie crust once, and while it made an amazingly flaky pie, it still tasted porky to my husband and I. I had hoped that home-rendered leaf lard wouldn't, but now I fear it will?

Any thoughts?

Emily

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