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Chinese Food Picture Album


hzrt8w
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I am going to add some pictures - just so it is not always hrzt8w who is uploading pcitures.

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Chinese Name: Dong Buo Ro

English: Braised Pork Belly

Description: Catonese take on a Northern Chinese Vinegar braised Pork Belly.

Served at Sea Harbour Restaurant, Richmond B.C.

Edited by canucklehead (log)
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Chinese Name: -

English Name: Dungess Crab w/ Kabocha Pumpkin and Black Bean Sauce

Description:A 3lb crab stir fried with japanese sweet pumpkin and fermented black beans.

Served at Sea Harbour in Richmond B.C.

This is currently my favorite dish... the sweet soft pumpkin and the sharp salty blackbeans are the perfect match with the fresh briny crab. God almighty this is a good dish!

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I am going to add some pictures - just so it is not always hrzt8w who is uploading pcitures.

...

Chinese Name: Dong Buo Ro

English: Braised Pork Belly

That's great, Lee! The more participations the merrier! I see who's been eating very well! :biggrin:

The Chinese name is 東坡肉.

They use one of those 5-nipple cut the Ben Hong was talking about... :laugh::laugh:

Edited by hzrt8w (log)
W.K. Leung ("Ah Leung") aka "hzrt8w"
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Chinese Name: Po Kuok Dan Tat

English Name: Portuguese Style Egg Tarts

Description: Custard in flaky pastry and carmelized top

I always wonder about the difference between Portuguese style egg tart and the regular "Hong Kong" style egg tart. Is it the once difference where in the Portuguese style, they torch the top of the egg filling? Otherwise the same?

Chinese name: 葡國蛋撻

Edited by hzrt8w (log)
W.K. Leung ("Ah Leung") aka "hzrt8w"
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Picture:

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Chinese name: 蟹肉干燒伊麵

English name: Yi Fu Noodles with Crab Meat

Category: Cantonese Rice/Noodle plates

Description: Yi Fu noodles stir-fried with crab meat, yellow chive and straw mushrooms in premium broth and dark soy sauce.

quote=hzrt8w,Nov 16 2005, 01:21 PM]

Picture:

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Chinese name: 豉油王鸡丝抄麺

English name: Soy Sauce Chicken Chow Mein

Category: Cantonese Rice/Noodle plates

Description: Soft egg noodles stir-fried with chicken, dark soy sauce, bean sprouts, onions and green onions.

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What makes a  Yi Fu Mein/伊麵 dish different from a ChowMein/抄麺  dishe beside the noodles?

Are there certain sauces or ingredients go with one vs. the other?

I think the sauces are slightly different. From my tastebuds, I think they use a mix of oyster sauce and dark soy sauce (and probably some sugar) in making Yi Fu Mein. It seems to be a bit sweeter. Chow Mein with soy sauce is strictly dark soy sauce (or a mix of light and dark soy sauce).

W.K. Leung ("Ah Leung") aka "hzrt8w"
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I always wonder about the difference between Portuguese style egg tart and the regular "Hong Kong" style egg tart.  Is it the once difference where in the Portuguese style, they torch the top of the egg filling? Otherwise the same?

葡國蛋撻

Well - the Portuguese style is based upon Pateis de Nata. In Portugal, the story (I think) goes that a recipe was needed to use up all of the extra egg yolks that were a by-product of the wine industry - the whites were used to clarify the wine.

So - nunneries were given the yolks and they turned them into tarts to sell for money. So I think that the HK egg tarts come by Macau. The HK egg tarts tend to be less rich then the real thing and the pastry is more like a pie pastry rather than puff pastry. In fact, in HK you can get egg whites only egg tarts if you want to be healthier.

Also the HK egg tarts filling tends to be about smooth slipperyness (appealing to the Cantonese palatte for textures) - the Portuguese style is richer - but also has more of a 'curd' mouthfeel.

But really - not to over think this - I would not turn down any warm fresh egg tart.

Edited by canucklehead (log)
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*drool* Wow amazing pictures. I LOVE steamed chicken.

OnigiriFB: Welcome to eGullet!

You will find many Chinese food pictures in this China forum. :smile:

Thank you :smile: I hope to join every in posting some yummy stuff. All the pictures are making miss LA :( I go out there to eat every year for a week around 4th of July. (Ok theres another reason but my friends all know the real reason I come out is for dim sum at Empress Pavilion, Sushi, Sam Woo's, and whatever other asian food we feel like :raz: )

I spent 5 years in Thailand during my teens so a lot of chinese food featured on eGullet are things I can't find in Iowa. Loving this forum :wub:

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Chinese name: 豉油王煎虾

English name: Pan-Fried Prawns with Superior Soy Sauce

Category: Cantonese dinner entree, seafood

Description: Shrimp with shells, pan-fried with some garlic and chopped green onions, light soy sauce and a dash of cooking wine.

(Offered at: New Hong Kong Wok Restaurant ((916) 454-2828), Sacramento, CA, USA)

W.K. Leung ("Ah Leung") aka "hzrt8w"
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Chinese name: 豉油王煎虾

English name: Pan-Fried Prawns with Superior Soy Sauce

Category: Cantonese dinner entree, seafood

Description:  Shrimp with shells, pan-fried with some garlic and chopped green onions, light soy sauce and a dash of cooking wine.

Oooh! they look good!

A question though: when I was taught to make this dish (courtesy of School of Mum), I was told to separate the heads and tails carefully and to cook the heads for about 30sec./1min. more to ensure that they and the tails were cooked to the same state.

But those ones in the picture look good.....am I wasting time fiddling about? Is this only an 'old wives' tale'? Am I just giving my spouse the chance to eat extra heads, while leaving me the tails?!?!?! :unsure:

Sorry I can't contribute to the thread with pictures. Just like onigiriFB, I live in a 'Chinese Restaurant Deprived Area' (CRDA).

And Canucklehead's pictures are making me regret leaving Vancouver, Canada more and more and more and more and more........ :sad:

<a href='http://www.longfengwines.com' target='_blank'>Wine Tasting in the Big Beige of Beijing</a>

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[...]I was told to separate the heads and tails carefully and to cook the heads for about 30sec./1min. more to ensure that they and the tails were cooked to the same state.

I am not sure how one can achieve this. I have not heard of it, and I never thought of it.

W.K. Leung ("Ah Leung") aka "hzrt8w"
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Picture:

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Chinese name: 蜜汁蒜子骨

English name: Pork Chops with Honey Garlic Sauce

Category: Cantonese dinner entree, pork

Description: Pork chops first battered and deep-fried, then coated with a sauce made with garlic, honey, vinegar and some soy sauce.

(Offered at: New Hong Kong Wok Restaurant ((916) 454-2828), Sacramento, CA, USA)

W.K. Leung ("Ah Leung") aka "hzrt8w"
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[...]I was told to separate the heads and tails carefully and to cook the heads for about 30sec./1min. more to ensure that they and the tails were cooked to the same state.

I am not sure how one can achieve this. I have not heard of it, and I never thought of it.

Oh, I've been thinking about it - and there are advantages to head and tail separation I feel. It's easy enough to do, just an extra step in preparation, that's all! I have a feeling the method comes from a particularly fussy family cook, whose cooking was famous for its exactitude (alas, she retired before I was old enough to know her!).

I haven't been able to afford the prawns to make this dish the two different ways (you would not believe the price here!), but on pure speculation, I love the way the juice from the separated heads enriches the sauce and, conversely, how having the heads bathed separately in the sauce improves there flavour....

But I will try your way hzrt8w! and give it a go! :biggrin:

when prawns are on sale.........

<a href='http://www.longfengwines.com' target='_blank'>Wine Tasting in the Big Beige of Beijing</a>

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Oh, I've been thinking about it - and there are advantages to head and tail separation I feel. It's easy enough to do, just an extra step in preparation, that's all! [...]

It sounds like your family's method calls for severing the shrimp head from the tail first. Correct me if I misunderstood. One concern for making it this way would be that the "juice" from the head would come out during cooking. This would make the dish overly "wet".

I am very lucky in that where I live, good size shrimp (with head) are regularly selling at US $3.99/lb.

W.K. Leung ("Ah Leung") aka "hzrt8w"
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I am very lucky in that where I live, good size shrimp (with head) are regularly selling at US $3.99/lb.

Lucky you! Around here, it's at least twice as much, if not more. I don't even think I can get the small size for that price. If I could get large head-on shrimp for $3.99/lb., I'd have it every night.

Karen C.

"Oh, suddenly life’s fun, suddenly there’s a reason to get up in the morning – it’s called bacon!" - Sookie St. James

Travelogue: Ten days in Tuscany

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I am very lucky in that where I live, good size shrimp (with head) are regularly selling at US $3.99/lb.

Lucky you! Around here, it's at least twice as much, if not more. I don't even think I can get the small size for that price. If I could get large head-on shrimp for $3.99/lb., I'd have it every night.

Oh my! I pay about $25-$28 USD (equivalent) a kilo...so aboout $14USD a pound?!?! Mind you, I could get them a bit cheaper but I prefer to buy the "Sustainable Marine Practice" certified ones. But even the cheaper ones are still only a few dollars cheaper (about a UKPound a kilo difference).

As with you, "I call the Duck", I think I would eat prawns every night if they were that cheap!!! :biggrin:

And you're right, hzrt8w, the dish does come out 'wetter' than yours....but the sauce is SO SO SO good! Actually, it's so yummy that I have been known, while clearing up dinner, to put left over rice into the sauce-glazed dish...and eat it over the sink - because I cannot bear even that tiny bit of sauce to go to waste.... :wacko:

<a href='http://www.longfengwines.com' target='_blank'>Wine Tasting in the Big Beige of Beijing</a>

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....but the sauce is SO SO SO good! Actually, it's so yummy that I have been known, while clearing up dinner, to put left over rice into the sauce-glazed dish...and eat it over the sink - because I cannot bear even that tiny bit of sauce to go to waste....  :wacko:

We're the same way. My brother and I practically get into wrestling matches to get the rest of the sauce. And once we asked for an extra bowl of rice just so the sauce wouldn't go to waste. The waiter also brought us a bowl of soup. My mother was mortified because (as she later said) she thought the waiter thought my mom didn't feed us properly. :laugh: Even my husband doesn't waste sauce.

Karen C.

"Oh, suddenly life’s fun, suddenly there’s a reason to get up in the morning – it’s called bacon!" - Sookie St. James

Travelogue: Ten days in Tuscany

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Yeah, you two... don't let the cholesterol stop you! :biggrin: I would love to have shrimp every night too... but it remains an indulgence only once a week or so.

Edited by hzrt8w (log)
W.K. Leung ("Ah Leung") aka "hzrt8w"
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Yeah, you two... don't let the cholesterol stop you!  :biggrin:  I would love to have shrimp every night too... but it remains an indulgence only once a week or so.

Ah Leung:

If your really serious, they consider moving to Seattle. Last night I brought 2 1/2 pounds of Fresh caught Local Spot Prawns loaded with Fat. (Roe)

If I lived in Hong Kong I would have purchased more Fat Prawns, separating the Roe and bringing it to a Noodle shop waiting for them to prepare "Roe Noodles".

I had to settle for my Spot Prawns every one with Fat selected by the Fish Monger at my request. (someone had to eat them, glad it was us)

Cooked them in Peanut Oil at high heat with oil first tempered with Ginger and Garlic Slivers, good dash of White Pepper and put the Prawn's into the Wok stirring until opaque, added dash of Wine and Superior Soy Sauce and Spring Onions and plated quickly.

Two of us finished all the Prawns, licking our fingers together with 4 bowls of Jasmine Rice and Poh Leh Tea.

I would have been happy just finding nice large Whole Prawns but finding fresh Spots with Fat was a blessing because of this topic being posted on eGullet. You timed it right.

Irwin :biggrin:

I don't say that I do. But don't let it get around that I don't.

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Yeah, you two... don't let the cholesterol stop you!  :biggrin:  I would love to have shrimp every night too... but it remains an indulgence only once a week or so.

As I understand it, there's no evidence at all that eating the Cholesterol contained in shrimp contributes to blood cholesterol, so enjoy. Same with eggs.

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