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eG Foodblog: bergerka - An opera about cooking, with pictures


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This is the trap we've been using to catch stray Micky Mice. They work really well and can't hurt larger animal types (though in your case I'd hide these in less accessable areas since they might be great fun to play from a ferret point of view). You do want to check the traps once a day or so, but other than that they're pretty simple.

I agree with everyone else - how exactly are you not a skilled cook? Certainly looks like you know your way around the kitchen rather well to me.

Meal suggestion: a chicken, roasted to perfection.

(PS - this Alto II is also enjoying the musical references :biggrin:)

Edited by tejon (log)

Kathy

Cooking is like love. It should be entered into with abandon or not at all. - Harriet Van Horne

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Aw, you guys are way too nice to me. Seriously, my only experience is helping other people rather clumsily, and occasionally baking something or sauteeing some spinach. Those vegetables came out remarkably pretty last night, but chopping them that way took me almost half an hour.

Ok, that is the LAST time I go to the Union Square greenmarket after noon but before coffee. I got a very late start this morning - was up too late websurfing and having ferret play and then got up to have MORE play this morning - the guys were rambunctions and wanted to be chased madly down the hall (I'd take a picture, but have you ever tried to photograph a running ferret??). It was crowded with people who wanted to move at the speed of...molasses... :angry:

I still got everything I needed for tonight, though. Here's what I'm making:

Aviation cocktails

Crudités (a friend is bringing those) with goat cheese, rosemary and fig dip

Short ribs braised in red wine

gratin dauphinois (yes, the real thing, with NO CHEESE)

brussels sprouts sauteed with apples, onions and bacon

and ewindels is bringing a tarte tatin, to continue the apple theme.

First I bought some Jonagold apples from my favorite Union Square guys, Terhune Orchards. Their apples are HUGE and delicious.

gallery_8920_3_492612.jpg

Terhune Orchards makes everyone smile! (that's a completely random person, I just liked the smile underneath the banner)

gallery_8920_3_418808.jpg

Next, a metric ton of brussels sprouts from Van Houten - they had the prettiest ones today. I bought potatoes for the gratin from them as well.

gallery_8920_3_256828.jpg

Finally, I bought rosemary from my favorite herb people, but I'm having a total blank moment as to the name of the place. Anyone know who it is on the northeast side of the green market on Saturdays, one of the ones running north-south, they have freaking amazing heirloom tomatoes in the summer?

Isn't this rosemary pretty??

gallery_8920_3_881775.jpg

Here's all the greenmarket stuff (I also bought a HUGE onion for the brussels sprouts and, not pictured, some creamline milk and heavy cream from Ronnybrook - their stand was so mobbed that trying to get a picture was an exercise in both futility and the limits of my patience) on my counter:

gallery_8920_3_283223.jpg

FINALLY, I got to sit down with a badly-needed cappuccino (note to self: turn the machine on the minute you get up so that next time you can have your coffee before you go face the rest of the world), a slice of pumpkin cranberry bread and a cheese biscuit from last night (if my bag hadn't been so goddamned heavy, I'd have stopped at Dunkin Donuts and worked out my frustrations. Thank goodness it was that heavy).

gallery_8920_3_823541.jpg

I am now going to lie on my big comfy chair and be braindead with computer for a while, then get moving. Your suggestions, by the way, have been MOST helpful so far. Tell me about cooking brussels sprouts? Based upon a conversation I had with Sam yesterday, I'm planning to blanch/shock them first, then sautee them later. My instinct is to start cooking the onion and bacon together first, then add the apples/shocked sprouts. Does that sound right?

K

P.S. Così fan tutte just happens to be one of my favorite things to sing - I've done it twice in the last year. Read into that what you will. HA!

Basil endive parmesan shrimp live

Lobster hamster worchester muenster

Caviar radicchio snow pea scampi

Roquefort meat squirt blue beef red alert

Pork hocs side flank cantaloupe sheep shanks

Provolone flatbread goat's head soup

Gruyere cheese angelhair please

And a vichyssoise and a cabbage and a crawfish claws.

--"Johnny Saucep'n," by Moxy Früvous

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This is the trap we've been using to catch stray Micky Mice. They work really well and can't hurt larger animal types (though in your case I'd hide these in less accessable areas since they might be great fun to play from a ferret point of view). You do want to check the traps once a day or so, but other than that they're pretty simple.

I agree with everyone else - how exactly are you not a skilled cook? Certainly looks like you know your way around the kitchen rather well to me.

Meal suggestion: a chicken, roasted to perfection.

(PS - this Alto II is also enjoying the musical references :biggrin:)

You need to get out of my head too - roasting a chicken is what I'm thinking of doing tomorrow afternoon while I watch football (I have a cocktail party to go to Sunday evening and figured it would be nice to have the chicken for leftovers and lunch next week, and besides, I've never done it before). Surely the Jets can beat the Chargers, right? If half the Chargers' starting lineup doesn't show up and the other half has food poisoning? Maybe?

K

Basil endive parmesan shrimp live

Lobster hamster worchester muenster

Caviar radicchio snow pea scampi

Roquefort meat squirt blue beef red alert

Pork hocs side flank cantaloupe sheep shanks

Provolone flatbread goat's head soup

Gruyere cheese angelhair please

And a vichyssoise and a cabbage and a crawfish claws.

--"Johnny Saucep'n," by Moxy Früvous

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By the way, folks...mussels have made the cut.  They're on the menu for Tuesday night.  Since I'll have a houseguest (michaeldauphinais from this very forum!), that works out well.  Klary - I may pm you this mussels recipe I found to see if you have suggestions, since your area of the world is the BEST for moules.

I'd be happy to help. I am not really a musselspecialist though.. although I did make some delicious musselsoup tonight (instead of the mussels in beer I had originally planned.. :shock: ).

A roast chicken is about the only roast that I am not scared of, please give it a try! Your house will smell lovely and there is great satisfaction in taking that golden bird out of the oven ! I love Marcella's chicken with two lemons, really the easiest and best roast chicken recipe out there IMO

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Kathleen, you're right on the money for the sprouts. I clean them and then cut an "X" in the bottom hard stem. I then blanche them until they're just slightly soft, umm think 3 - 5 minutes depending on amount etc. but I always test with a knife. They can sit then. Start with the bacon and onion, add apples and sprouts when the former is half done. Apples can also be added at the end if you want them to be a bit firmer. I assume you're sauteeing in butter and whatever bacon fat there is, should you need a little extra liquid try apple juice, or even maple syrup. Your dinner sounds wonderful, can't wait to see pictures.

Barbara Laidlaw aka "Jake"

Good friends help you move, real friends help you move bodies.

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Kathleen I have to agree from reading here that you clearly CAN cook. Are you perhaps setting the bar a bit high for yourself? I don't think I should be able to sing opera just cause I can sing at all...

and just for the record - we need more ferret porn! :biggrin:

Do you suffer from Acute Culinary Syndrome? Maybe it's time to get help...

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Great chopping skills Kathleen! You could help out in my kitchen any day :biggrin:

For cleaning the brussel sprouts: you may need to pick off some outer leaves or trim off the bottoms as well. They can be a bit tough. This is my favorite way to eat them though!

How was the coffee?? Did you do it with cinnemon and nutmeg? I tried it with both this morning but I found the nutmeg seemed to mellow out the cinnemon and I really like the punch of straight cinnemon.

Ya'll beat me to the roast chicken suggestion! I love the flavor of herbed butter rubbed under the skin as well. Set a 1/2 stick of butter out to soften, mince up fresh herbs you have on hand (rosemary, thyme, sage, parsley) totals about 1/4 to 1/2 cup and mix that into the softened butter with salt and pepper to taste. Use your fingers to loosten the skin on the bird (from the neck end) and stick your hand in gently to loosten the skin. Then you can put the butter in and massage it in (from the outside of the skin is best). S&P the skin, and you are ready to roast!

You are doing very well so far! It looks like you know more than you thought about cooking though. If you can pull from multiple recipes rather than having to be a slave to one, you must have the basic concepts of flavorings and methods down.

Happy Cooking!

Genny

(Hmmmm, I've referred to my Cooks Companion and have found no reference to "assload" as a measurement. :hmmm: Can you provide an equivalent in gallons or litres? :raz: )

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I still got everything I needed for tonight, though.  Here's what I'm making:

Aviation cocktails

Crudités (a friend is bringing those) with goat cheese, rosemary and fig dip

Short ribs braised in red wine

gratin dauphinois (yes, the real thing, with NO CHEESE)

brussels sprouts sauteed with apples, onions and bacon

and ewindels is bringing a tarte tatin, to continue the apple theme.

Un moment, madamoiselle. Do you mean le vrai gratin dauphinois contains no cheese? Well, I did check with Julia (Child), and she did say in her book that the cheese can be omitted. Apparently, you are a NO CHEESE fan in your gratin, ehh??

and just for the record - we need more ferret porn!  :biggrin:

I'm certain that after the end of Act I (the short ribs dinner), there will be a ballet scene featuring the three ferrets ... and maybe Mickey ...

Russell J. Wong aka "rjwong"

Food and I, we go way back ...

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(Hmmmm, I've referred to my Cooks Companion and have found no reference to "assload" as a measurement. :hmmm: Can you provide an equivalent in gallons or litres? :raz: )

hmm.. it may be the American version of the often used 'shitload' (or 'shload')- a term widely used in Canada.

I'll be in NY later this week, so the timing of your blog couldn't be better. Thanks for sharing with us.

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(Hmmmm, I've referred to my Cooks Companion and have found no reference to "assload" as a measurement. dry.gif Can you provide an equivalent in gallons or litres? tongue.gif )

I believe that measurement varies from cook to cook, depending on the size of the posterior in question :laugh:

Kathy

Cooking is like love. It should be entered into with abandon or not at all. - Harriet Van Horne

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Pam R - please PM me, I'd love to have coffee/a cocktail if you have time next week.

Genny - I was so frustrated I forgot the spices. :sad: I promise to do it tomorrow.

In my case, an assload was 40 brussels sprouts. It varies by ass size. :biggrin:

Ok! Here's what I did this afternoon & evening.

First, I threw together about 10 oz of goat cheese, 2 tablespoons of rosemary, 2 tablespoons of white wine vinegar, 1/4 cup of milk, 1/2 cup chopped figs and salt and pepper into the food processor.

Goat cheese dip:

gallery_8920_3_80049.jpg

then I took the short ribs out of the fridge, and following Abra's fantastic instructions, removed the meat (and the remaining solids) and reduced the liquids to make a sauce.

Sauce, reducing.

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Here's what it looked like when it was done. Of everything I made tonight, I am most proud of this.

gallery_8920_3_246350.jpg

I then cut the previously blanched sprouts in half and put them into some water with 1/2 lemon squeezed into it, and added two chopped Jonagold apples.

Apples and sprouts in water:

gallery_8920_3_324495.jpg

While those were soaking and the sauce from the ribs was reducing, I started the milk for the gratin dauphinois. I used the recipe from Jeffrey Steingarten's "It must have been something I ate," which is the closest thing I have found to the recipe used by Giselle Rey-Gagneux, the mother of my French family, who made the most amazing gratin dauphinois I have ever had. For 8 people, I doubled the recipe. The original recipe is as follows:

Combine in a saucepan, then heat to boiling and remove from heat:

1 cup (scant) milk

1 large garlic clove, peeled, lightly crushed

3/4 teaspoons salt

1/2 teaspoon ground white pepper

1/8 teaspoon freshly ground nutmeg

gallery_8920_3_500261.jpg

While that is heating, use 1/2 stick of butter to butter the bottom of a shallow baking pan. Peel 1.5 pounds of potatoes, rinse them and pat them dry. Slice them 1/8 inches thick, discarding the smallest slices, and evenly arrange the slices in one layer in the pan (confession time: I made two layers, so sue me. My French mom did it too).

Bring milk to boil again and then remove garlic and pour it over the potatoes. Cover the pan with aluminum foil and bake at 425 degrees F for 15 minutes, till the milk has been absorbed.

Gratin with milk, ready to go into the oven.

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While it is baking, bring 1.5 cups heavy cream to the boil and remove from heat. when the potatoes are done, remove the aluminum foil. Bring the cream back to a boiland pour it over the potatoes. Dot the mixture with 1/2 stick of butter (no, this recipe is not good for you).

Bake, uncovered, for 20-25 minutes, till the potatoes have turned golden brown. Let the gratin settle for ten minutes, then serve.

Finished gratin, with parsley sprinkled on top, ready to serve:

gallery_8920_3_339711.jpg

While that was cooking, people started arriving, so I made some Aviation cocktails as per Sam's recipe - 2 oz gin, 0.5 oz maraschino liqueur, 0.5 oz lemon juice, garnished with homemade maraschino cherries:

gallery_8920_3_493845.jpg

The wonderful Charlie set out crudites with the goat cheese/rosemary/fig dip, which unfortunately I did not get a picture of. In the meantime, the wonderful ewindels did, well, what I do when Sam's home, which was wash things, chop things and put things away.

I sauteed the onions and bacon in a pan for about ten minutes, then added the brussels sprouts and apples and some salt and pepper.

gallery_8920_3_533544.jpg

I was worried that there were too many in the pan and they would boil instead of saute, but they worked out fine.

Finished sprouts:

gallery_8920_3_140369.jpg

In the meantime, the short ribs had gone back into the pot and were reheating:

gallery_8920_3_238798.jpg

Here's what they looked like when they were ready to go. That's not the flash, it's the ladle I put in.

gallery_8920_3_1134196.jpg

and here's what everything looked like on the plate!

gallery_8920_3_690216.jpg

Fancy it wasn't. SarahD was kind and called it "rustic."

However, either everything was good (I can attest that the short ribs really, really tasted good and I'm very glad I didn't mess with the sauce - my first impulse was wrong, wrong, wrong, it was perfect as it was), or there wasn't enough of it! Here's what the dishes looked like after dinner.

gallery_8920_3_360327.jpg

Ok, see, I mean, this was a TON of short ribs.

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Because it was so hot outside, ewindels made his justifiably famous strawberry-rhubarb tart instead of tarte tatin.

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And here's the money shot - the bowl o' whipped cream with rum.

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Here's the tart with whipped cream, plated.

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And here are my happy and very patient guests! From left, ewindels, Juli, SarahD, Eric_Malson, Charlie the best roommate, Leanne and Matt.

gallery_8920_3_659550.jpg

We finished the evening in the best possible way - watching a hilarious documentary about a singer we all know and loathe.

So the answer is: I can cook. At least, short ribs and gratin dauphinois. This, by the way, is largely thanks to the help and encouragement I have gotten on this site, and the GREAT help of Charlie and ewindels, who just made it all work.

I may never eat again!

Basil endive parmesan shrimp live

Lobster hamster worchester muenster

Caviar radicchio snow pea scampi

Roquefort meat squirt blue beef red alert

Pork hocs side flank cantaloupe sheep shanks

Provolone flatbread goat's head soup

Gruyere cheese angelhair please

And a vichyssoise and a cabbage and a crawfish claws.

--"Johnny Saucep'n," by Moxy Früvous

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Brava, Diva! A really wonderful meal. Where Kathleen got this idea that she can't cook is a mystery to me.

As delicious as those spare ribs were (and they were very, very tasty), my favorite dish was the gratin dauphinois. I know of no better way to enjoy a cup or two of heavy cream. And re an earlier post on this thread: I had a look in Elizabeth David, who says that while Escoffier and Austin de Croze include cheese and eggs, other regional authorities say the authentic version is with potatoes and thick cream only. After tasting this, I'm a believer!

My restaurant blog: Mahlzeit!

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Pam R - please PM me, I'd love to have coffee/a cocktail if you have time next week.

Genny - I was so frustrated I forgot the spices. :sad:  I promise to do it tomorrow.

In my case, an assload was 40 brussels sprouts.  It varies by ass size. :biggrin:

Ok!  Here's what I did this afternoon & evening.

First, I threw together about 10 oz of goat cheese, 2 tablespoons of rosemary, 2 tablespoons of white wine vinegar, 1/4 cup of milk, 1/2 cup chopped figs and salt and pepper into the food processor.

Goat cheese dip:

gallery_8920_3_80049.jpg

...

Love the menu, bergerka, congrats on a wonderful dinner party! Do you mind sharing what wines you had with the meal?

I also had a question re: the goat cheese fig dip. First, I wanted to clarify if it was dried figs (seems like it would be so). Second, is it a real winner? Would you make it again? It sounds like it could be really nice but I'm just wondering what the final consensus was. (Sorry if I missed the back story on this earlier in the thread).

"Under the dusty almond trees, ... stalls were set up which sold banana liquor, rolls, blood puddings, chopped fried meat, meat pies, sausage, yucca breads, crullers, buns, corn breads, puff pastes, longanizas, tripes, coconut nougats, rum toddies, along with all sorts of trifles, gewgaws, trinkets, and knickknacks, and cockfights and lottery tickets."

-- Gabriel Garcia Marquez, 1962 "Big Mama's Funeral"

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Love the menu, bergerka, congrats on a wonderful dinner party!  Do you mind sharing what wines you had with the meal?

I also had a question re: the goat  cheese fig dip.  First, I wanted to clarify if it was dried figs (seems like it would be so).  Second, is it a real winner?  Would you make it again?  It sounds like it could be really nice but I'm just wondering what the final consensus was.  (Sorry if I missed the back story on this earlier in the thread).

Hi, Ludja!

The wines were all brought by the guests. I had just said "something that goes with very rich red meat and potatoes."

We had:

Trapiche Oak Cask Malbec, 2003, from Mendoza, Argentina (I love malbecs), brought by Charlie the coolest roommate.

Duas Quintas Douro, 2001, from Portugal, brought by Eric_Malson (Eric and I had this with the arroz de frango, and loved it)

Chateau La Mourelle Bordeaux, 2003, brought by Juli

Clos de Galevesses Lalande de Pomerol 2001, brought by Sarah

Columbia Crest Grand Estates Syrah 2001, brought by, I believe, Sarah.

And yes - dried figs in the goat cheese dip. Don't use fresh, they won't work. I got that recipe from my friend Carl, who made it for his birthday - all of us clustered around the table fighting to get to it. It's unexpectely delicious.

Good morning/afternoon, all! I slept late, played with ferrets for two hours and am now yelling at the tv as the Jets drive down the field (ok, they missed the field goal, but it WAS from 50 yards out, and they didn't turn the ball over or fumble the snap this time - O-line starting to do what they're paid for and protect the QB. Two missed catches, though. Come on, McCareins, Coles, Vinny can't do any better than hit you in the HANDS).

Because I am a compulsive, this is what my kitchen looked like both last night before I went to bed and this morning when I got up:

gallery_8920_3_414459.jpg

I got up to cappuccino (I used about 1/8 tsp of nutmeg and 1/4 of cinnamon, Genny - perfect combo) and the Sports section of the NY Times:

gallery_8920_3_64933.jpg

I then played with happy ferrets. I hope these are ok to post here - if not, mods, let me know and I'll set them up on a different website and provide a link.

Asher likes to play tug-of-war with a ball with a bell in the middle (he also likes to shake the ball in the middle of the night and make it go "JINGLE!"

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(he won and ran under the bed, shaking it madly)

Baby Issachar was very annoyed with me for moving his paper towel roll collection. He had to pick them all up and take them back into the closet, where they belong.

gallery_8920_3_399492.jpg

In the meantime, behind my back, Zebulun jumped from the bed to the top of the ferret penthouse and headed for the bookshelf, the better to knock all the books onto the floor.

gallery_8920_3_557712.jpg

I'm considering roasting a chicken later, but it'll have to wait till the game is over. Since San Diego scored while I was typing this, it doesn't look great. *sigh* Wake me in the postseason?

It occurred to me that there hasn't been much singing to talk about this week. This blog actually fell at a very good time for me to focus on cooking - I just came off two solid weeks of performances and auditions, and more auditions start the week after I'm done, but for now I have a little break to focus on what I'm doing in the kitchen.

K

Edited by bergerka (log)

Basil endive parmesan shrimp live

Lobster hamster worchester muenster

Caviar radicchio snow pea scampi

Roquefort meat squirt blue beef red alert

Pork hocs side flank cantaloupe sheep shanks

Provolone flatbread goat's head soup

Gruyere cheese angelhair please

And a vichyssoise and a cabbage and a crawfish claws.

--"Johnny Saucep'n," by Moxy Früvous

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great looking short ribs - that sauce looks truly perfect, and I am going to have to go get some goat cheese because that dip sounds wonderful.

And Asher is just the cutest little guy on paws! (with no offence meant to Issachar or Zedulun, who are both cuties too)

Do you suffer from Acute Culinary Syndrome? Maybe it's time to get help...

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I must say this is a fun thread to scroll through!

It took me a while to figure out where you do your marketing, bergerka. When I did, I was even more impressed by some of the prices which are cheaper than they are in D.C. if not by gobs. I wonder if that's because so many restaurants rely on Union Square in addition to the scale and venerability of the market.

Speaking of Union Square, have you ever made the hashed brussel sprouts in the first US Cafe cookbook? Not as decadent as yours, which I will definitely try, but the recipe is one of my favorites.

P.S. Of course this is all so voyeuristic, but I must compliment you on maintaining the culinary theme in your lunchtime reading material.

Yeah, yeah we know, so I'm sloppy:

Edited by Pontormo (log)

"Viciousness in the kitchen.

The potatoes hiss." --Sylvia Plath

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Kathleen, fantastic dinner last night! Looks like you guys had a great time, on top of eating great food - brava, indeed!

I noticed your copy of Moo next to the ferret cage...what a great book! It makes me think I need to go back and re-read it.

"We had dry martinis; great wing-shaped glasses of perfumed fire, tangy as the early morning air." - Elaine Dundy, The Dud Avocado

Queenie Takes Manhattan

eG Foodblogs: 2006 - 2007

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I must say this is a fun thread to scroll through!

It took me a while to figure out where you do your marketing, bergerka.  When I did, I was even more impressed by some of the prices which are cheaper than they are in D.C. if not by gobs.  I wonder if that's because so many restaurants rely on Union Square in addition to the scale and venerability of the market.

Speaking of Union Square, have you ever made the hashed brussel sprouts in the first US Cafe cookbook?  Not as decadent as yours, which I will definitely try, but the recipe is one of my favorite.

P.S. Of course this is all so voyeuristic, but I must compliment you on maintaining the culinary theme in your lunchtime the reading material.

I'm very glad you're enjoying it! I don't actually have the US Cafe cookbook, I don't think - would love to hear more about that recipe.

I was amazed, everything but the meat was extremely inexpensive. The whole thing cost, if you don't mind my saying so, about $65 for 8 people, and about 80% of that was the meat. Worth it, though.

Jeffrey Steingarten is one of my favorite food writers, ever. His chapter on the subsistence diet in "The Man Who Ate Everything" makes me laugh out loud every time I read it. I finally got to meet him last year and was incredibly tongue-tied, what a nice man!

Basil endive parmesan shrimp live

Lobster hamster worchester muenster

Caviar radicchio snow pea scampi

Roquefort meat squirt blue beef red alert

Pork hocs side flank cantaloupe sheep shanks

Provolone flatbread goat's head soup

Gruyere cheese angelhair please

And a vichyssoise and a cabbage and a crawfish claws.

--"Johnny Saucep'n," by Moxy Früvous

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I got up to cappuccino (I used about 1/8 tsp of nutmeg and 1/4 of cinnamon, Genny - perfect combo) and the Sports section of the NY Times:

No eGullet support of the New York Marathon? Harrumph.

I always attempt to have the ratio of my intelligence to weight ratio be greater than one. But, I am from the midwest. I am sure you can now understand my life's conundrum.

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I got up to cappuccino (I used about 1/8 tsp of nutmeg and 1/4 of cinnamon, Genny - perfect combo) and the Sports section of the NY Times:

No eGullet support of the New York Marathon? Harrumph.

Dude, you kidding? There's Jets football on. C'mon. Seriously. :raz::biggrin:

Actually Charlie the roommate went off to watch the marathon. I can think of almost nothing more obnoxious than pushing my way through a huge crowd to watch a bunch of people running...on purpose.

Snack time!

I cut up a leftover Jonagold from last night and ate it with the very last dregs of the peanut butter and some brie I found in the fridge.

gallery_8920_3_246668.jpg

31-20 Chargers in the 4th quarter and a hell of a runback by Justin Miller. Come on, Jets...let's turn this season around...

Edited by bergerka (log)

Basil endive parmesan shrimp live

Lobster hamster worchester muenster

Caviar radicchio snow pea scampi

Roquefort meat squirt blue beef red alert

Pork hocs side flank cantaloupe sheep shanks

Provolone flatbread goat's head soup

Gruyere cheese angelhair please

And a vichyssoise and a cabbage and a crawfish claws.

--"Johnny Saucep'n," by Moxy Früvous

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I love the way you write, Kathleen. People who love food often pick up more in the kitchen than they think. Sure you can cook.

I have one question about your kitchen--where is the stepladder for reaching your pots and pans? Or do you have some other way of getting them down? Perhaps ferret go fetch?

Ruth Dondanville aka "ruthcooks"

“Are you making a statement, or are you making dinner?” Mario Batali

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I love the way you write, Kathleen.  People who love food often pick up more in the kitchen than they think.  Sure you can cook.

I have one question about your kitchen--where is the stepladder for reaching your pots and pans?  Or do you have some other way of getting them down?  Perhaps ferret go fetch?

Hi, Ruth! The stepladder is out of sight, against the wall to the right of the stove. I'm tall enough to reach all the pots and pans hanging up, and some of the things on the top shelf behind them, though.

31-26, Chargers. What a freakin' heartbreaker...most suspenseful last two minutes of a football game that I've seen maybe...ever.

I'm drowning my pain by roasting a chicken. Not using any particular recipe, just read a whole bunch of 'em, talked to a lot of people and am in the mood for fresh herbs, so I cut off the extraneous weird dangly pieces of Mr. Chicken, removed the bags o'organs from the cavity, gave him an olive oil, salt and pepper massage both inside and out (making this the most intimate relationship I've ever had with poultry) and stuffed half a head of garlic, some sprigs of rosemary, and just for the heck of it, some sprigs of time into the cavity. Then I put him on an oiled rack in a roasting pan, breast up, and have just now shoved him into a 475 degree oven for an hour or so. Anything I need to watch out for? Do differently? The herbs sure smell good. :wub:

Here's Mr. Chicken, ready to go into the oven.

gallery_8920_3_301602.jpg

Not much of him will get eaten tonight - I'm going to a cocktail party that will have food AND booze (if they'll let me, I'll take pictures) and will give some to Eric_Malson (this is a huge chicken, 5 pounds). But I figure I can eat chicken for lunch tomorrow, anyway!

Basil endive parmesan shrimp live

Lobster hamster worchester muenster

Caviar radicchio snow pea scampi

Roquefort meat squirt blue beef red alert

Pork hocs side flank cantaloupe sheep shanks

Provolone flatbread goat's head soup

Gruyere cheese angelhair please

And a vichyssoise and a cabbage and a crawfish claws.

--"Johnny Saucep'n," by Moxy Früvous

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