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Butternut Squash Soup Recipe


tippingvelvet
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Super easy, tipping velvet. Just cook 3-4 butternut squashes, cubed, in chicken stock, then add the cooked (and blended) squash to a pot with some sauteed onions, maybe a little garlic or ginger. Add salt and (white?) pepper and whatever additional flavoring your guests would like: I made a great curried squash soup a few weeks ago, but you could just add some nutmeg and cinnamon, or perhaps some Chinese 5 spice powder, or some sage and olive oil, or even some chipotle powder and cumin. Toss on some croutons, cheese, even toasted tortillas, depending on the spice combinations you've selected.

Squash is remarkably adaptable. It's hard to screw up squash soup, let me tell you! :biggrin:

Chris Amirault

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Chris's recipe sounds good to me - I often cook butternut soup with some apples or pears. In fact, I'd just add some to Chris's soup and it'll add a nice tart/sweet note.

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I usually start by roasting off the squash a day or so in advance. Steaming works, too.

For each squash, I cube four slices of bacon, 1 onion, 2 carrots, and 2 celery stalks. Saute all in the soup-making pot, making sure to get some good deep color on them. Deglaze the pan with 2 cups chicken stock for each squash. Add the squash. Simmer for 15 minutes. Add 1/8 tsp nutmet and 1/4 tsp chili powder per squash. Puree. Finish with 1/4 cup cream per squash. Top with chopped chive or parsley.

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Try adding some heavy cream as a garnish or i've seen whipped cream fig quinelles floated to finish. Perfect seasonal food.

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I usually add apple cider instead of apples...and be prepared to use some salt the squash is very sweet and you need balance, a little hot sauce never hurts either, a little sparkle like a high note.

tracey

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For a simply flavored butternut squash soup, drizzled Austrian pumpkin seed oil make a beautiful and delcious garnish alongside some croutons. The oil is dark green and contrasts nicely with the soup and the oil has a very deep, distinctive flavor.

Edited by ludja (log)

"Under the dusty almond trees, ... stalls were set up which sold banana liquor, rolls, blood puddings, chopped fried meat, meat pies, sausage, yucca breads, crullers, buns, corn breads, puff pastes, longanizas, tripes, coconut nougats, rum toddies, along with all sorts of trifles, gewgaws, trinkets, and knickknacks, and cockfights and lottery tickets."

-- Gabriel Garcia Marquez, 1962 "Big Mama's Funeral"

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My standard squash soup (butternut or pumpkin) is:

1 butternut squash, peeled, seeded, and diced (2-3 C)

1 C diced onion (1 medium)

1 C diced carrot (2 carrots)

1 medium sweet potato, diced

1 rutabaga, peeled and diced

1 apple, peeled and diced

1.5 quarts chicken or veg stock

salt+pepper

grated nutmeg or mace (about 1/2 tsp)

(1/2 C heavy cream -- optional)

Bring everything except the creamn to a simmer and cook about 45 minutes until everything is soft. Buzz with an immersion blender until smooth. Add the cream if used and heat. Adjust seasonings.

He who distinguishes the true savor of his food can never be a glutton; he who does not cannot be otherwise. --- Henry David Thoreau
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Chris's recipe sounds good to me - I often cook butternut soup with some apples or pears.  In fact, I'd just add some to Chris's soup and it'll add a nice tart/sweet note.

I also often add pears to my butternut squash soup. A good simple recipe is using curry powder and a cinamon stick as flavouring. An unseasonal garnish that works well is finely diced red peppers.

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I've been using a recipe from Cook's Illustrated for years. Basically, you sweat the innards (seeds and stringy stuff) and some onions or shallots in butter, then add water to this mixture and use it to steam the the squash flesh. Then you strain the "stock" that was the steaming liquid and combine it with the steamed squash flesh in a blender until it is your desired soup consistency. Obviously, there were some spices and I think some heavy cream also in the recipe, but I don't remember the specifics. It's the technique that makes this really good (and it IS really good).

I've been considering a first course this year by spooning this soup around a savory flan and maybe garnishing it with some fried sage leaves. Or the tempura sage leaves in this month's Food and Wine. I'm still mulling it all over....

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...

I've been considering a first course this year by spooning this soup around a savory flan and maybe garnishing it with some fried sage leaves. Or the tempura sage leaves in this month's Food and Wine. I'm still mulling it all over....

Nice idea! I typically always serve a soup beforehand but this is an interesting twist. Still not too heavy if the portions are not to large and lots of flavoring options. Roasted garlic flan, anyone?

"Under the dusty almond trees, ... stalls were set up which sold banana liquor, rolls, blood puddings, chopped fried meat, meat pies, sausage, yucca breads, crullers, buns, corn breads, puff pastes, longanizas, tripes, coconut nougats, rum toddies, along with all sorts of trifles, gewgaws, trinkets, and knickknacks, and cockfights and lottery tickets."

-- Gabriel Garcia Marquez, 1962 "Big Mama's Funeral"

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