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Ice cream -- Japanese style


JSD
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  • 3 months later...

Gyukaku, the popular yakiniku chain, is now selling their ice cream at convenience stores!

Currently they are only selling the vanilla with kuromitsu and kinako (scroll down for a picture)

I picked this up last night and it was really good, the kinako comes in a separate pack tat the sprinkle on yourself and the kuromitsu is swirled into the vanilla ice cream.

Kristin Wagner, aka "torakris"

 

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  • 1 month later...

I made matcha ice cream a few nights ago, for which I have a complete recipe on my blog.

I think I need to make some anko, and maybe some shiratama, and maybe get some fruit and gold leaf. Oh, and my kuromitsu supply is still sorely lacking. Once those situations are properly remedied, there will be cream anmitsu in my house.

Even lacking such accessories, this was still quite nice on its own.

matchaaisu_2D640w.jpg

Edited by JasonTrue (log)

Jason Truesdell

Blog: Pursuing My Passions

Take me to your ryokan, please

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Matcha powder is high on my list for my SO to purchase when she visits Japan in July.

Lacking the room for another appliance, we simply mix matcha powder with good quality vanilla ice cream that has been slightly softened.

I agree, freshly made matcha ice cream is miles better than a commercial matcha ice cream that has been sitting around for weeks (months?).

Baker of "impaired" cakes...
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  • 1 month later...

While in Osaka I was treated to Cherry Blossom Mochi and Cherry Blossom Ice Cream... the latter of which tasted oddly like carrot cake in some strange way.

I need to be able to re-create this ice cream for someone - though obviously not exactly.

Though I'm sure the basic ingredients are the same as any ice cream - can anyone help with the specifics of the unique ingredients and can you tell me where I might order them?

Any help will be appreciated.

"At the gate, I said goodnight to the fortune teller... the carnival sign threw colored shadows on her face... but I could tell she was blushing." - B.McMahan

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While in Osaka I was treated to Cherry Blossom Mochi and Cherry Blossom Ice Cream... the latter of which tasted oddly like carrot cake in some strange way.

I need to be able to re-create this ice cream for someone - though obviously not exactly.

Though I'm sure the basic ingredients are the same as any ice cream - can anyone help with the specifics of the unique ingredients and can you tell me where I might order them?

Any help will be appreciated.

Not sure if this will help much, but I had some two weeks ago at the Fancy Food Show. Bubbie's Mochi Ice Cream had "Sakura" (cherry blossom) and a bunch of other really good flavors. The stuff is great, good enough to be the ice cream at Nobu. It ain't cheap, but it's worth it.

I know that you were looking for ingredients, but as I don't have a clue about that I thought that you might want to try some of this as a comparison.

Brooks Hamaker, aka "Mayhaw Man"

There's a train everyday, leaving either way...

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I know that you were looking for ingredients, but as I don't have a clue about that I thought that you might want to try some of this as a comparison.

Even if it doesn't help in making it - fabulous resource, I imagine I'll order just to try them all... thanks.

There are 3 distinctions in what I've had:

1. A red bean mochi wrapped in cherry leaf

2. A red bean filled with a cherry blossom mochi exterior

3. A cherry blossom ice cream containing no mochi

I am most interested in the 3rd if anyone has had this.

"At the gate, I said goodnight to the fortune teller... the carnival sign threw colored shadows on her face... but I could tell she was blushing." - B.McMahan

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I never had sakura (cherry blossom) ice cream.

There seem to be several versions of such ice cream, such as the one containing 'sakura liqueur'

http://www.rakuten.co.jp/sch/545439/526373/#541985

the one containing salted cherry blossoms, and the one containing cherry leaves.

Simple recipe for making sakura ice cream with salted cherry blossoms:

http://www.adver.co.jp/c-ai-new/tokushu/3.htm

Ingredients (4 servings)

400 ml store-bought vanilla ice cream

3 tbsp salted cherry blossoms

Soak salted cherry blossoms in lukewarm water to remove salt. Shred them.

Mix them with softened vanilla ice cream quickly.

Freeze in the freezer to harden.

Salted cherry blossoms are called sakura no shiozuke 桜の塩漬け in Japanese.

Other webpages containing photos of sakura ice cream:

http://www.otama.tv/mypage/g_all.asp?m_id=250&cnt=9&page=3

(Scroll down)

http://www.oishi-mise.com/sakura-aisu.htm

http://plaza.rakuten.co.jp/canonixy/diary/20050403/

(Scroll down)

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There seem to be several versions of such ice cream, such as the one containing 'sakura liqueur'

http://www.rakuten.co.jp/sch/545439/526373/#541985

the one containing salted cherry blossoms, and the one containing cherry leaves.

Salted cherry blossoms are called sakura no shiozuke 桜の塩漬け in Japanese.

Perfect - the liqueur I should be able to get - didn't know that existed and I'll try to find the preserved cherry blossoms and experiment with both.

Hiroyuki you are helpful as always.

"At the gate, I said goodnight to the fortune teller... the carnival sign threw colored shadows on her face... but I could tell she was blushing." - B.McMahan

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  • 10 months later...

Hey, I got curious and found this food blog which mentions the horse flesh ice cream and a number of other "delicacies".

Actually, the crab ice cream she mentions sounds like it might even work for me. The kani we normally find tends to be a little sweet and usually served cold, sometimes on ice. Throwing in a little cream and sugar is not so great a leap...

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  • 7 months later...
  • 5 months later...

Actually I think these are borrowed from a couple of articles that appeared about a year or two ago somewhere else (Mainichi Shinbun, most likely), but it's possible the author has contributed some original text.

Sweet potato ice cream is quite nice, and I make it myself. Rice is a common gelato flavor in the US and in Europe. A friend from Hokkaido liked potato ice cream but felt that the potato is generally almost unnoticeable. The persimmon one doesn't seem strange to me either, though I haven't made or eaten one. I might even be convinced to have the yaki-nasu. Miso would work if the balance were right; dengaku tofu or dengaku nasu are sweet-savory.

Squash ice cream, mentioned as "unmarketable" near the bottom of that article, is actually quite nice, if made with a nice butternut squash or kabocha. It doesn't even need to be covered up with pumpkin pie spice. I still make that when the winter squashes start being nice.

Since corn is naturally sweet I'd even try that; I believe another ice cream producer in the US is starting to market one, based on something I vaguely recall reading a week or so ago; I think it was originally test marketed in Mexico.

The fish and raw meat ice creams are generally only sold in ryokan or omiyage shops as a curiosity. They're not aggressively marketed, but they are typically meant to highlight some locally popular ingredient. They probably owe their entire existence to the more quirky ice creams on Iron Chef.

http://www.who-sucks.com/food/101-frighten...round-the-world

Im digging the seaweed flavor and the corn...

Yuck on most! :wacko: Can't imagine these are actually marketed. I've seen sweet potato, rice, and corn ice cream though but haven't tried. Those fish ice cream sounds so disgusting!

Jason Truesdell

Blog: Pursuing My Passions

Take me to your ryokan, please

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Actually I think these are borrowed from a couple of articles that appeared about a year or two ago somewhere else (Mainichi Shinbun, most likely), but it's possible the author has contributed some original text.

Sweet potato ice cream is quite nice, and I make it myself. Rice is a common gelato flavor in the US and in Europe. A friend from Hokkaido liked potato ice cream but felt that the potato is generally almost unnoticeable. The persimmon one doesn't seem strange to me either, though I haven't made or eaten one. I might even be convinced to have the yaki-nasu. Miso would work if the balance were right; dengaku tofu or dengaku nasu are sweet-savory.

Squash ice cream, mentioned as "unmarketable" near the bottom of that article, is actually quite nice, if made with a nice butternut squash or kabocha. It doesn't even need to be covered up with pumpkin pie spice. I still make that when the winter squashes start being nice.

Since corn is naturally sweet I'd even try that; I believe another ice cream producer in the US is starting to market one, based on something I vaguely recall reading a week or so ago; I think it was originally test marketed in Mexico.

The fish and raw meat ice creams are generally only sold in ryokan or omiyage shops as a curiosity. They're not aggressively marketed, but they are typically meant to highlight some locally popular ingredient. They probably owe their entire existence to the more quirky ice creams on Iron Chef.

http://www.who-sucks.com/food/101-frighten...round-the-world

Im digging the seaweed flavor and the corn...

Yuck on most! :wacko: Can't imagine these are actually marketed. I've seen sweet potato, rice, and corn ice cream though but haven't tried. Those fish ice cream sounds so disgusting!

Sweet potato does sound very nice. Did you use Japanese satsuma imo? Also, miso ice cream might work very well. A little bit of miso goes a long way so ice cream made from miso should taste very much like sweetened miso. I like yuzu miso and addition of yuzu, lime, mikan, orange or other fruits to miso might work very well in ice cream. When you think about it, azuki beans sweetened may sound terrible for some non-Japanese tasters. So, if beans can be made into ice cream, then why not others.

I've not tasted rice gelatto. Can you actually taste the rice? I also like the sound of nasu-eggplant, but I wonder if the taste comes through as nasu-eggplant?

I've made azuki ice cream many times, but I cannot quite get the concentrated azuki taste so far. My ice cream tase more like vanilla ice cream with azuki and not wow.....it's azuki.

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As Jason noted, most of the seafood and meat flavors are made purely as novelties (it would appear from the labels that most are made by the same companies).

Sweet potato ice cream, made with purple ube (aka Okinawan sweet potatoes) is a popular flavor here in Hawaii. One Japanese company out of California makes cherry blossom ice cream that I can find packaged in some supermarkets here. Both flavors are tasty.

Some shops in Chinatown here and in NYC (I don't know where else, but I would bet other Chinese stores sell it) sell durian ice cream. It needs to be double-wrapped or placed in a separate freezer because of its strong odor, but it has a mild taste.

And I tried chocolate garlic ice cream in Gilroy, California (the garlic capital of the world). It didn't taste bad, though the chocolate was more evident than the garlic. That, too, is sold more as a novelty.

SuzySushi

"She sells shiso by the seashore."

My eGullet Foodblog: A Tropical Christmas in the Suburbs

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I have made sweet potato ice cream with satsumaimo and with more common varieties from the US... Usually I bake them first, so it's kind of a "yaki-imo" flavor.

I haven't had much experience with azuki ice cream, but I have made kuromame chocolate ice cream. We used a fairly high proportion of beans.

Rice gelato actually has rice in it, so the rice is quite noticeable... it's basically a vanilla gelato with grains of rice, kind of like a frozen version of rice pudding. I'm not sure if the base is cooked with the rice or if it's just what Germans call "milchreis" (rice cooked in milk) blended with a standard gelato base.

Sweet potato does sound very nice.  Did you use Japanese satsuma imo?  Also, miso ice cream might work very well.  A little bit of miso goes a long way so ice cream made from miso should taste very much like sweetened miso.  I like yuzu miso and addition of yuzu, lime, mikan, orange or other fruits to miso might work very well in ice cream.  When you think about it, azuki beans sweetened may sound terrible for some non-Japanese tasters.  So, if beans can be made into ice cream, then why not others.   

I've not tasted rice gelatto.  Can you actually taste the rice?  I also like the sound of nasu-eggplant, but I wonder if the taste comes through as nasu-eggplant? 

I've made azuki ice cream many times, but I cannot quite get the concentrated azuki taste so far.  My ice cream tase more like vanilla ice cream with azuki and not wow.....it's azuki.

Jason Truesdell

Blog: Pursuing My Passions

Take me to your ryokan, please

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[...]Some shops in Chinatown here and in NYC (I don't know where else, but I would bet other Chinese stores sell it) sell durian ice cream. It needs to be double-wrapped or placed in a separate freezer because of its strong odor, but it has a mild taste.[...]

Really? A mild taste? That's surprising.

But anyway, all sorts of sweets made with durian are extremely common in Malaysia, a country that grows delicious durians.

Michael aka "Pan"

 

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[...]Some shops in Chinatown here and in NYC (I don't know where else, but I would bet other Chinese stores sell it) sell durian ice cream. It needs to be double-wrapped or placed in a separate freezer because of its strong odor, but it has a mild taste.[...]

Really? A mild taste? That's surprising.

But anyway, all sorts of sweets made with durian are extremely common in Malaysia, a country that grows delicious durians.

That's if you can get past the smell! It's probably diluted with milk or cream quite a bit. I don't find the taste itself that distinctive.

SuzySushi

"She sells shiso by the seashore."

My eGullet Foodblog: A Tropical Christmas in the Suburbs

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