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Eatmywords

1 star Paris restaurants or equivalent

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Hello everyone,

I’ve read the recent threads that relate to Paris restaurants on tight budgets and 2-3 star establishments but haven’t found too much curent data on the in between.

I’m looking for the best off-the-beaten-path experiences from 50-125 Euro per person, per meal (wine not necessarily included). Any 1 stars or equivalent in this range?

I'll be there in 2 weeks (mid November). We have 8 days to go crazy for lunch and dinner. We are adventurous eaters (offal included) and would love to come back with some super unique experiences (unlike the typical NYC bistro/brasserie fare).

Any advice would be much appreciated.

thx

Eat


That wasn't chicken

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Your request for the unusual brings instantly to my mind Les Magnolias, located in the Paris suburb of Le Perreux sur Marne, a 30 minute RER ride from central Paris' Haussmann-St.Lazare station. Jean Chauvel is most often compared to Gagnaire in his unusual use of ingredients. There is an article on him in the Oct-Nov 2005 (French) Saveurs magazine. His food, like Gagnaire's, is not for everyone, and while you may be flabbergasted, you should certainly not be bored.

(edited to correct error in magazine credit)


Edited by Margaret Pilgrim (log)

eGullet member #80.

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You might consider these, all of which we thought were the stars of our trip in July:

Les Ormes *

L' Angle de Faubourg * (Really interesting wines)

Mon Vieil Ami

Le Pamphet

Le Clos Des Gourmets

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Your request for the unusual brings instantly to my mind Les Magnolias, located in the Paris suburb of Le Perreux sur Marne, a 30 minute RER ride from central Paris' Haussmann-St.Lazare station. 

A fine idea; a great place and it's much closer than it looks (on a nice day, one can walk directly east from the Chateau de Vincennes Metro; about 6 km).

I'd raise a question I often do; why the devotion to the Michelin ratings?; they make mistakes (eg Helene Darroze) like every rating system.

That said, however, other one-star places that are within your budget, at least the menus are at lunch, are the Violin d'Ingres + Beatilles.

And, still sticking to the Michelin; the Bib Gourmands that qualify are the Dome du Marais, Bon Acceuil, Cerisaie, Regalade, Beurre Noisette + Le Troquet (despite the over-salting we experienced last month.)


John Talbott

blog John Talbott's Paris

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Your request for the unusual brings instantly to my mind Les Magnolias, located in the Paris suburb of Le Perreux sur Marne, a 30 minute RER ride from central Paris' Haussmann-St.Lazare station.  Jean Chauvel is most often compared to Gagnaire in his unusual use of ingredients.  There is an article on him in the Oct-Nov 2005 (French) Saveurs magazine.  His food, like Gagnaire's, is not for everyone, and while you may be flabbergasted, you should certainly not be bored.

(edited to correct error in magazine credit)

I just read the Saveur article as well, and Les Magnolias looks pretty amazing.

A place I'd like to try, but is a bit above my budget, is Chez Jean in the 9th. Has anyone been? I've read good things. Carte: 60 euros.

Or La Table du Lancaster would be in your budget. I can't comment on it though, since I haven't been.


www.parisnotebook.wordpress.com

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Your request for the unusual brings instantly to my mind Les Magnolias, located in the Paris suburb of Le Perreux sur Marne, a 30 minute RER ride from central Paris' Haussmann-St.Lazare station.  Jean Chauvel is most often compared to Gagnaire in his unusual use of ingredients.  There is an article on him in the Oct-Nov 2005 (French) Saveurs magazine.  His food, like Gagnaire's, is not for everyone, and while you may be flabbergasted, you should certainly not be bored.

(edited to correct error in magazine credit)

I just read the Saveur article as well, and Les Magnolias looks pretty amazing.

A place I'd like to try, but is a bit above my budget, is Chez Jean in the 9th. Has anyone been? I've read good things. Carte: 60 euros.

Or La Table du Lancaster would be in your budget. I can't comment on it though, since I haven't been.

I liked the La Table du Lancaster both times I went and I agree with Felice that it and Chez Jean, esp. the latter, whose prices keep on inching up, may be over your budget though.


John Talbott

blog John Talbott's Paris

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It's been almost two years since I ate in Paris, but we thoroughly enjoyed:

1. Chez Benoit -- fairly traditional though. We went on the recommendation of a French chef we love in San Francisco. I think it's a one-star (though the next two have no stars, they were very good.)

2. Chez Michel (out near the Gare du Nord what's that, the 9th? 10th?) -- lots of game and countrified cooking. One of our top favorites from the trip.

3. Ze Kitchen Galerie -- very much like California cooking, which we found to be rare in gay Paree. Lots of whimsical preparations in a modern setting.

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Your request for the unusual brings instantly to my mind Les Magnolias, located in the Paris suburb of Le Perreux sur Marne, a 30 minute RER ride from central Paris' Haussmann-St.Lazare station.  Jean Chauvel is most often compared to Gagnaire in his unusual use of ingredients.  There is an article on him in the Oct-Nov 2005 (French) Saveurs magazine.  His food, like Gagnaire's, is not for everyone, and while you may be flabbergasted, you should certainly not be bored.

(edited to correct error in magazine credit)

Wow, I'm on Magnolias site now......attention to detail and creative aspect appear incredible! I will certainly try to get there as well look into all the other recommendations.

Thank you all for your advice. I have not been to Paris since I was boy (some 20 yrs ago) and while a strole down any block will probobly lead us to a memorable experience I really want to have some sort of proven agenda. I will compile a list and attempt to hit as many of these places as possible!

Oh, and Mr. Talbot. I was only using the 1 star as a reference to mid-range proven establishments. (I know little of the worthiness of the Michellin to place too much reliance.) :blink:

Thx again!

Eat!


That wasn't chicken

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Oh, and Mr. Talbot.  I was only using the 1 star as a reference to mid-range proven establishments.  (I know little of the worthiness of the Michellin to place too much reliance.)

Ah well then, check our past threads and you'll find lots of places recommended by eGullet members that fit your budget and are terrific.


John Talbott

blog John Talbott's Paris

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Oh, and Mr. Talbot.  I was only using the 1 star as a reference to mid-range proven establishments.  (I know little of the worthiness of the Michellin to place too much reliance.)

Ah well then, check our past threads and you'll find lots of places recommended by eGullet members that fit your budget and are terrific.

I will contiue to do so Mr. Talbott. It is not easy going through them all. Thx for you help. I admire your devotion and passion to the French threads.

While I have you (and any others who have some input), given the price ranges discussed (apprx 40-100E), are there any must try non-French? Some amazing sushi or other cuisine that's unlike what I have in NYC? (I had chinese in Florence once and it was pretty nasty.......they cooked everything in olive oil : )

thx

Eat!


That wasn't chicken

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While I have you (and any others who have some input), given the price ranges discussed  (apprx 40-100E), are there any must try non-French?  Some amazing sushi or other cuisine that's unlike what I have in NYC?  (I had chinese in Florence once and it was pretty nasty.......they cooked everything in olive oil : )

thx

Eat!

I'm not the best person to answer this question because I eat almost exclusively in French french places except for neighborhood pizza and sushi places on the "Cook's night off." I have sometimes been pleasantly surprised by some Asian chefs use of French products in Paris, making the dishes taste better than in their home country or the US. As an example, I liked the Thai food at the Blue Elephant a while back and Viet-namese food at Xinh Xinh for a passel of kids - but they're not places I'd write home about.

There have been several non-French places highly rated by Figaroscope + Zurban that I recounted briefly in the Digest this fall - you can check them out.


John Talbott

blog John Talbott's Paris

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While I have you (and any others who have some input), given the price ranges discussed  (apprx 40-100E), are there any must try non-French?  Some amazing sushi or other cuisine that's unlike what I have in NYC?  (I had chinese in Florence once and it was pretty nasty.......they cooked everything in olive oil : )

thx

Eat!

I'm not the best person to answer this question because I eat almost exclusively in French french places except for neighborhood pizza and sushi places on the "Cook's night off." I have sometimes been pleasantly surprised by some Asian chefs use of French products in Paris, making the dishes taste better than in their home country or the US. As an example, I liked the Thai food at the Blue Elephant a while back and Viet-namese food at Xinh Xinh for a passel of kids - but they're not places I'd write home about.

There have been several non-French places highly rated by Figaroscope + Zurban that I recounted briefly in the Digest this fall - you can check them out.

Thanks much John. I checked out both on a City Search / Menu pages type of french site called www.pagesrestos.com. (I'm sure your familar with it). I found it very useful (esp if you can read a little french).......great for searching by ambience, cuisine and neighborhood.

thx

Eat!


That wasn't chicken

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While I have you (and any others who have some input), given the price ranges discussed  (apprx 40-100E), are there any must try non-French?  Some amazing sushi or other cuisine that's unlike what I have in NYC?  (I had chinese in Florence once and it was pretty nasty.......they cooked everything in olive oil : )

thx

Eat!

I'm not the best person to answer this question because I eat almost exclusively in French french places except for neighborhood pizza and sushi places on the "Cook's night off." I have sometimes been pleasantly surprised by some Asian chefs use of French products in Paris, making the dishes taste better than in their home country or the US. As an example, I liked the Thai food at the Blue Elephant a while back and Viet-namese food at Xinh Xinh for a passel of kids - but they're not places I'd write home about.

There have been several non-French places highly rated by Figaroscope + Zurban that I recounted briefly in the Digest this fall - you can check them out.

Pat&I dined at "Thiou" last week for the 2nd time and we feel that it is a very high quality Thai restaurant with delicious langoustine nems which were not as greasy as is often the case. Thiou has a few original dishes such as "Le Tigre Qui Pleure". The restaurant is located in the 7th at the corner of rue Surcouf and the Quai d'Orsay.

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My splurge for this trip to Paris is a single one star or equiv. Wife is from Isere so I eat wonderful French family food daily.

Like a restaurant a bit youngish w/ some fashioable atmosphere but great (innovative?) food.

Tall order I know. Robert, De Marais is closed. thx

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My splurge for this trip to Paris is a single one star or equiv.  Wife is from Isere so I eat wonderful French family food daily.

Like a restaurant a bit youngish w/ some fashioable atmosphere but great (innovative?) food.

Tall order I know.  Robert, De Marais is closed. thx

Errrr you're looking for advice for Jan 3???

Isn't that today? :shock: (or probably yesterday by the time you read this).


More Cookbooks than Sense - my new Cookbook blog!

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My splurge for this trip to Paris is a single one star or equiv.  Wife is from Isere so I eat wonderful French family food daily.

Like a restaurant a bit youngish w/ some fashionable atmosphere but great (innovative?) food.

Tall order I know.  Robert, De Marais is closed. thx

My recs for one star Michelin Red Guide restos, in rank order, are: Les Magnolias, Le Violin d'Ingres, Table de Lancaster, Gaya Rive Gauche....etc...., + l'Atelier de JR if you don't want to talk. Not yet one stars but probably will be or should be in March - Dominique Bouchet, Ze Kitchen Galerie, Sensing + Spring.

John Talbott

blog John Talbott's Paris

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I realized after reading an article in today's JDD and thinking about well-priced places that among the Michelin one stars, one place stands out as the best price/quality bargain - Bath's, 25, rue Bayen 01.45.74.74.74, with its 25 E lunch menu. I'm remiss in not returning after a great meal earlier this year.


John Talbott

blog John Talbott's Paris

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