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TallDrinkOfWater

New Generation Gins

370 posts in this topic

A friend of mine recently picked up some Zuidam Dry Gin and was kind enough to allow me to try it.

It made a good dry martini with Noilly Pratt vermouth.

Very lightly flavored, though, with more of a general spice flavor and not that strong a juniper accent.  Base spirit seemed relatively smooth.

We both thought it would be a good stepping stone gin for vodka martini drinkers.  Probably not much good for mixed drinks needing a stronger gin flavor, though.

~Erik

edit - add comment.

I've been selling quite a bit of Zuidam Dry Gin, great appeal to the Bombay Sapphire Drinker, also light and has some nice citrus notes that make it accessable for some flavored vodka drinkers who had not really considered gin.

Dave

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I've always felt that gin is something with more depth and possibilities than many of the other spirits. Just look at the list of ingredients on a Sapphire! there's a world of investigation out there for the curious, given the depth and breadth of botanicals that are now coming available.

Who's making their own gin at home now? There's the question. (Mind the revenooers!).

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Actually if anyone is interseted I've done some reviews that answer some of the questions in the older posts about reviews of other gins at my website www.spiritsreview.com. I'm surprised that Kensington isn't more popular - it's aged in Bourbon barels for 2 years and makes a interesting martini and even a good gin and tonic (something I would not at first thought possible)They have a 3 year old version also but alas it is only in a fancy decanter at $180 a bottle and my curiosity (and money) only extends so far...


The Pleasures of Exile are Imperfect at Best, At Worst They Rot the Liver.

Spirits Review.com

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I just picked up a bottle of Martin Miller's Reformed from BevMo yesterday - they were running a special on the 1.75 litre bottle for $27.99, so I thought I'd take a gamble based on the positive reviews I've seen and buy it instead of my usual go-to gin, Bombay Sapphire.

So far I've only tried it in a martini, but I have to say that I like it a lot. Very fruity and floral - to my palate, the juniper is very far in the background, and the fruitier botanicals dominate. I can't wait to try it in an Aviation, Jasmine, or Corpse Reviver #2.

Is this my new standard? No, but I like it enough to make sure that I keep it stocked in my bar.


"Martinis should always be stirred, not shaken, so that the molecules lie sensuously one on top of the other." - W. Somerset Maugham

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I just found this thread and wanted to respond to an earlier posting about Aviation Gin--not the cocktail called the Aviation but the gin product called Aviation Gin.

This is, to my taste, a superbly herby Dutch style gin (genever-reminiscent: juniper, coriander, cardamom, anise, lavender) gin produced in Portland, Oregon by House Spirits. Three like-minded guys have collaborated on its creation: Lee Medoff, Christian Krogstad, and Ryan Magarian. They also produce Medoyeff Vodka and have (or will soon have) a rum, an aquavit, and an Oregon pure malt whiskey. These guys make great stuff!!

I find the Aviation Gin makes an extra "spicy" martini. Because of the nature of the drink, it showcases the base alcohol's flavors, and with this gin you get a lot of herby aromatics, which gives the Martini a particular character (that may well not appeal to those who favor vodka-based Martinis). This gin also makes a wonderful Aviation cocktail (after which the product was named, of course). I have been to two diffeerent events where the Aviation Gin was mixed into different cocktails and served as accompaniments to multi-course meals designed to pair with the cocktails . . . what an eye-opening food/drink experience! In fact, this food pairing experience inspired us to start a cocktail column in our magazine)!

The Aviation Gin is in the market, but obviously is made in pretty small quantities and likely not available in non-Northwest or West Coast markets. But, it may still be orderable through some kind of liquor store system (local laws and all that may make it dfficult). Their website is at www.medoyeff.com.

And no, I have no economic connection with these guys at all. I just like them and their product and would like to see them succeed even more then thay have.

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Speaking of Aviation Gin, I've been meaning to give it a try.

Since it is supposed to be Dutch in style, I thought the thing to do would be to try it in Mr. Wondrich's Improved Holland Gin Cock-tail.

Fortunately, the bartender at The Alembic (flash heavy site) was not too busy early this evening, and tolerated my whimsy.

I used the "Super-Improved" receipt from the NY Times article...

---

IMPROVED HOLLAND GIN COCKTAIL

Adapted from David Wondrich

2 dashes Angostura bitters

1 scant teaspoon simple syrup*

1/2 teaspoon Maraschino Luxardo liqueur.

1 dash absinthe, or substitutes like Pernod or Absente

2 ounces Holland gin (also called genever gin; Zuidam is a good brand)

1 thinly cut lemon twist.

Combine the liquid ingredients in a cocktail shaker with ice. Shake well (or stir) and strain into a chilled martini glass. Twist the swatch of lemon peel over the top, rub it around the rim of the glass, and drop it in.

---

In any case, the Aviation Gin makes this a very floral, almost perfumey, cocktail. It rated a, "Wow, I'm going to have that for my shift cocktail," from the bartender.

Very different from the same cocktail with Boomsma gin.

I'm still not sure I got a handle on Aviation Gin as a product. I may have to try that spicy Martini Cole Danehower mentions.


Edited by eje (log)

---

Erik Ellestad

If the ocean was whiskey and I was a duck...

Bernal Heights, SF, CA

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Speaking of Aviation Gin, I've been meaning to give it a try.

Since it is supposed to be Dutch in style, I thought the thing to do would be to try it in Mr. Wondrich's Improved Holland Gin Cock-tail.

Mr. Wondrich's?

Improved Brandy Cocktail

(Use ordinary bar-glass.)

Take 2 dashes Boker's (or Angostura) Bitters.

3 dashes gum syrup.

2 dashes Maraschino.

1 dash Absinthe.

1 small piece of the yellow rind of a lemon,

twisted to express the oil.

1 small wine-glass of brandy.

[...]

Improved Gin Cocktail.

Made the same way as the Improved Brandy Cocktail

substituting Holland or Old Tom gin for the

brandy.

Via Jerry Thomas.

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Mr. Wondrich's?

[...]

Oh, sorry, I shouldn't credit him with it. My mistake.

Wondrich doesn't take credit for the Improved Holland Gin Cock-Tail in "Killer Cocktails", just sez, "In 'Gangs of New York' era Gotham, if there was one drink the sporty gents in the top hats were partial to, it was a Gin Cock-Tail. This 'improved' version dates to 1876."


---

Erik Ellestad

If the ocean was whiskey and I was a duck...

Bernal Heights, SF, CA

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FWIW, the recipe I have for the Improved Holland Gin Cock-Tail goes something like this:

<blockquote>2 oz : genever gin

1 tsp : 2:1 demerara simple syrup

1 tsp : maraschino liqueur

2 dashes : Peychaud's bitters

Mix in a glass with ice. Garnish with lemon twist.</blockquote>

Seems pretty different to me


Samuel Lloyd Kinsey

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It's interesting that the NY Times chose to publish a recipe that was closer to the Thomas' recipe than the one from Killer Cocktails.

Wonder if it was Dave's choice or the editors?


---

Erik Ellestad

If the ocean was whiskey and I was a duck...

Bernal Heights, SF, CA

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Wonder if it was Dave's choice or the editors?

Let's just say I advised them on it.


aka David Wondrich

There are, according to recent statistics, 147 female bartenders in the United States. In the United Kingdom the barmaid is a feature of the wayside inn, and is a young woman of intelligence and rare sagacity. --The Syracuse Standard, 1895

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Hello Everyone,

Looks like no one has mentioned North Shore Distillery gin. It's located just north of Chicago and is available in local stores (and via their websites). I finally tasted this a couple of months ago. The first thing that came to mind was black pepper and then cardamon. I really like the gin, which is kind of surprising since I'm not a huge fan of black pepper, but since I do really like cardamon, they balanced each other out. So far we've only had it in martini's (with a twist). We will continue to experiment.


I like cows, too. I hold buns against them. -- Bucky Cat.

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Speaking of Aviation Gin, I've been meaning to give it a try...  Since it is supposed to be Dutch in style, I thought the thing to do would be to try it in Mr. Wondrich's Improved Holland Gin Cock-tail....

IMPROVED HOLLAND GIN COCKTAIL

Adapted from David Wondrich

2 dashes Angostura bitters

1 scant teaspoon simple syrup*

1/2 teaspoon Maraschino Luxardo liqueur.

1 dash absinthe, or substitutes like Pernod or Absente

2 ounces Holland gin (also called genever gin; Zuidam is a good brand)

1 thinly cut lemon twist.

Combine the liquid ingredients in a cocktail shaker with ice. Shake well (or stir) and strain into a chilled martini glass. Twist the swatch of lemon peel over the top, rub it around the rim of the glass, and drop it in.

...Very different from the same cocktail with Boomsma gin....

I've been meaning to give this one a try but I haven't managed to get past the Fancy Gin Cocktail on my list. The FGC requires two fewer ingredients and gets built in a rocks glass and apparently I'm just too lazy and too enamored of the FGC to pull two more bottles from the cabinet and grab the shaker from the cupboard.

Erik, how do you like the Boomsma? The only genever I've tried is the Zuidam. I have no idea where it stands in the genever hierarchy but it's incredibly delicious. Sam's just started carrying the young and old Boomsma genevers. They're a little cheaper than the Zuidam but I've heard both good and bad. What say you?

Kurt

PS. For me Peychaud's bitters is the only choice when making an Old Fashioned (or Fancy) Gin Cocktail. Angostura makes for a tasty drink but with Peychaud's the FGC is a classic.


Edited by kvltrede (log)

“I like to keep a bottle of stimulant handy in case I see a snake--which I also keep handy.” ~W.C. Fields

The Handy Snake

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[...]

Erik, how do you like the Boomsma?  The only genever I've tried is the Zuidam.  I have no idea where it stands in the genever hierarchy but it's incredibly delicious.  Sam's just started carrying the young and old Boomsma genevers.  They're a little cheaper than the Zuidam but I've heard both good and bad.  What say you?

[...]

Kurt,

I'm in a similar boat. The only Zuidam we get here is their London Dry, which I think is an OK dry gin. Very subtle and vodka-ish. The only Genevers I've tried are the Boomsmas. The Boomsmas seem like fine gins. Nothing to get terribly excited about, but, ok for the price. Wish I had something to compare them to!

I did see a dusty row of DeKuyper Genever at a liquor store in Burlingame the other day, and am hoping to return and get a bottle some time soon.

Unfortunately, there is the small matter of a certain newly released 2006 Antique Collection which is calling my name much more strongly...


---

Erik Ellestad

If the ocean was whiskey and I was a duck...

Bernal Heights, SF, CA

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I just tried a couple Aviations with the Aviation Gin and have to say that I'm not that impressed. I tried a few different recipes with and without creme de violette but none struck me as being any better than other gins I've used. I'll stick to the Miller's Westbourne Strength for my Aviations (since I can't get the Plymouth Navy Strength here in the US).

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I just tried a couple Aviations with the Aviation Gin and have to say that I'm not that impressed. I tried a few different recipes with and without creme de violette but none struck me as being any better than other gins I've used. I'll stick to the Miller's Westbourne Strength for my Aviations (since I can't get the Plymouth Navy Strength here in the US).

I gotta admit I find it a little odd that they named what they are calling a "Genever-style" gin after the Aviation cocktail. I don't think anybody advises using Genever in the Aviation. Actually, it's a bit odd that they would launch a "Genever-Style" gin as their first gin, period. It's true, Genevers can be hard to find in the US; but, they are called for in few cocktails. I can find 11 in the cocktaildb and Chas Baker calls for it in the Hemingway attributed "Death in the Gulf Stream".

Personally, I think it would be nicer to have a well made modern example of an Old Tom gin.

donbert, have you had other Genever gins? Do you think the Aviation Gin compares to them?

Anyone know if they are using any malt wine in their distillate?

Oh, and Aviations aside, I thought the Aviation Gin made a pretty interesting Improved Holland Gin Cock-tail.


---

Erik Ellestad

If the ocean was whiskey and I was a duck...

Bernal Heights, SF, CA

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Personally, I think it would be nicer to have a well made modern example of an Old Tom gin.

There was a reference in todays Observer to a Martinez they serve at the Dorchester (Hotel) in London - apparently using an Old Tom style gin they have distilled specially for them .

Any one tried this gin ?

Gethin


Edited by gethin (log)

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Interesting article about Bluecoat Gin in the local paper a few weeks back:

Bluecoat Aims for the Top Shelf

Has anyone tried Bluecoat yet? I will be in Philadelphia in a couple of weeks and any ideas on where to pick up a bottle will be greatly appreciated.

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Interesting article about Bluecoat Gin in the local paper a few weeks back:

Bluecoat Aims for the Top Shelf

Has anyone tried Bluecoat yet? I will be in Philadelphia in a couple of weeks and any ideas on where to pick up a bottle will be greatly appreciated.

The State Stores carry it now. Many bars and restaurants in the city also have it now too. Distribution has been going well for the brand.


CherieV

Eat well, drink better!

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I was surprised to see Bluecoat behind a bar here in California!

Haven't seen it in liquor stores, so I suspect it might have been a suitcase import.

If it is still there when I get back, I'll have to ask for a martini.


---

Erik Ellestad

If the ocean was whiskey and I was a duck...

Bernal Heights, SF, CA

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According to the Bluecoat Website, the gin is only available in PA and NJ for now. However, the website might be a little behind the curve.

I suspect you're probably right about the San Francisco bottle though. A "suitcase" import, indeed. :biggrin:

Try a Bluecoat Aviation! I bet that would be really good with the citrus-ey character of the gin. I made up a drink with Bluecoat that was a tall gin-kir variant. Bluecoat, creme de cassis and soda with a big lemon twist. Also refreshing, but more of a summer beverage.


Katie M. Loeb
Booze Muse, Spiritual Advisor

Author: Shake, Stir, Pour:Fresh Homegrown Cocktails

Cheers!
Bartendrix,Intoxicologist, Beverage Consultant, Philadelphia, PA
Captain Liberty of the Good Varietals, Aphrodite of Alcohol

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Nice gin article from Gary Regan in today's San Francisco Chronicle:

Is Gin the New Vodka?

Includes tasting notes for several new generation gins including some I hadn't heard of before. G'Vine sounds particularly intruiging, distilled from grape based neutral spirits and flavored with green grape flowers.

I don't remember what brand of gin was in my very first cocktail, but I do know that it was highly perfumed, and it fell into what I now call the "slap me upside the head with juniper and dab a little behind your ears" category. Think Tanqueray. Think Beefeater. Think Boodles. Think Plymouth. Traditional gins all, these stalwarts are as dry as a bone, and in varying degrees they're all about juniper and perfume. Not all gins follow this path, though, and some of the new bottlings on the market come bearing rather unusual flavor profiles.

---

Erik Ellestad

If the ocean was whiskey and I was a duck...

Bernal Heights, SF, CA

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they have Tanqueray Rangpur at the London Bar in NY. I'll check it out.

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Gin was my very first distilled spirit. I sampled it in a room-temperature gimlet -- gin and Rose's Lime Juice -- at a party thrown by my parents. Dad made it for me. Why room temperature? This was in England, circa 1963. I was 12 years old. Dad thought it was time to wean me off the Guinness. [italics mine.]

THIS, ladies and gentlemen, is one of the many things that are so cool about Gary.


Samuel Lloyd Kinsey

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Has anybody out west tried 209?


I'm on the pavement

Thinking about the government.

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