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Chufi

Dutch Cooking (2005-2006)

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klary-

what ever you do it will be wonderful... i only know a lot of dutch or frisian food from(ok go ahead and laugh all) romance novels from betty neels who died earlier this year. she was a nurse married to a "dutchman" (don't know if he was dutch or frisian) and all of her books included food like crazy whether in england or the netherlands - pankoken, dutch babies, erwentoensoep, etc.(please pardon the mispellings).

growing up in new york we knew of ollie bollen(early dutch doughnuts) and what about the ristaffel(rice table)?

love any information you have on any foods, especially the "plain food". with the cooler weather coming are there any endings that are special? fruit pies or something of the sort?

thanks for your incredible input...

suzi

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Klary, thank you for sharing the recipe for boterkoek! As I was baking it last night, the house smelled so good, this warm buttery aroma... What makes this cookie even more delightful is that it's a family recipe, not something invented in a restaurant kitchen. Do I need to say the tart is already all gone?

Boterkoek-vi.jpg

I have to say though that in the States self-rising flour already has salt added to it. But I only had regular flour, so I added a little salt and a teaspoon of baking powder. And the ginger I have is not packed in syrup.

Keep those recipes coming!

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Lieve Klary,

Last night, in your honor, I baked these Jan Hagel Koekjes.

gallery_11814_1914_161787.jpg

Zoentjes,

Yetty


Edited by spaghetttti (log)

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I don't think anybody makes stroopwafels at home. You need special equipment.. I could try and get a picture of the guy at the Albert Cuypmarket who makes them, so you would see what I mean..

I'm sure glad they don't have it here all the time, because I'm a stroopwafel addict BIGTIME! And, I wouldn't be able to keep my fingers away from this sticky treat! Here's a pic of the press (I was fascinated) I took at a Dutch Fair held in KL a couple of months back.

gallery_12248_1983_38387.jpg

Thanks, Klary, for starting this thread.


Edited by Tepee (log)

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I found a recipe for Dutch Pancakes and it calls for wheat flour. Does that mean whole wheat flour? Cake flour? All purpose flour?

I love Pannekoeken. Do you make them?

- kim

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Klary, thank you for sharing the recipe for boterkoek! As I was baking it last night, the house smelled so good, this warm buttery aroma...

Alinka.. that is just gorgeous.. I'm going to show that to my mother next time she comes to visit!

Lieve Klary,

Last night, in your honor, I baked these Jan Hagel Koekjes. 

Yetty, I am honoured indeed.. they look delicious.. I was planning on making Jan Hagel somewhere in this project, when I do, maybe we can compare recipes?

Here's a pic of the press (I was fascinated) I took at a Dutch Fair held in KL a couple of months back.

thanks for posting that picture Tepee! They are addictive aren't they :smile: ?

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I found a  recipe for Dutch Pancakes and it calls for wheat flour. Does that mean whole wheat flour? Cake flour? All purpose flour?

I love Pannekoeken. Do you make them?

- kim

As a matter of fact, what a coincedence, I just made some..

I always made pannenkoeken (pancakes ) without a recipe, just mixing flour, eggs and milk until it looked right.. Today I looked up a number of recipes and found that they all have different proportions of the ingredients.. I guess it has to do with whether you like your pancakes thick and fluffy or thin and crispy (more crepe like). So, I made pancakes and took notes of what I did:

Make a batter from 2 eggs, 200 grams flour, 300 ml. milk, pinch of salt. Depending on the size of your pan and how much batter you use per pancake, this will yield about 4-6 pancakes.

gallery_21505_1968_45792.jpg

I wanted spekpannenkoeken (pancakes with bacon) so I fried up some smoked bacon. I like to fry the bacon first, then pour of the bacon grease, wipe out the pan and then proceed to bake the pancakes (in butter).

gallery_21505_1968_15276.jpg

on the left is one with apple and bacon. The appel slices were first sauteed in the butter, before adding the bacon and batter to the pan.

Flip the pancake when the top is almost dry.

On the plate with Dutch sugar syrup:

Spekpannenkoek

gallery_21505_1968_9778.jpg

and appel-spekpannenkoek (apple and bacon)

gallery_21505_1968_42951.jpg

I should add that these are much smaller and thinner than the ones you get at the special Pancake restaurants. (where you can also eat weird pancakes like pancake stroganoff, pancake with chicken curry, and I'm pretty sure a pancake with aragula and goatscheese has made an appearance by now :shock: )

For home cooking I prefer this size, so you can have more different flavoured ones.

Pancakes are a favorite dinner for kid's birthday parties but most adults love them too... :smile:


Edited by Chufi (log)

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I. Am. Going. To die! Gorgeous. When I was in Amsterdam, I just couldn't get enough of those pancakes, sweet or savory. I don't think I ate any normal meals there, just pancakes, fries with mayo, and herring :smile:.

This is now the first thread I rush to read when I get to eGullet.

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Yay! Thanks for the pictures. Yum.

Your pannenkoeken batter looks like my Grandma's Palacinke batter. The recipes are similar but she added sugar to hers.

I definitely see appel-spekpannenkoek in my future.

- kim

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Hey Chufi: still awaiting the answer to my question

on Dutch trading and where the spices went?

Milagai

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I've never tried Dutch cooking but a cuisine that puts bacon IN the pancakes has to be worth a try.

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Hey Chufi:  still awaiting the answer to my question

on Dutch trading and where the spices went?

Milagai

Hi Milagai

yes I have been thinking about that... And I have to say that I am no expert on the history of Dutch Cooking or on the history of the spice trade.. so what follows is simply my own assumption about this matter.

It is true that the Netherlands played a major role in the spice trade in the 17th and 18th centuries.. and recipes from those days show the use of mace, nutmeg, cloves, sugar and cinnamon in both sweet and savoury dishes. The spices were expensive though so it was only a certain part of society that could benefit from this. They used it as a way to express their wealth.

The use of these spices in sweet dishes is still common (as you will see somewhere in the near future when I will start baking the December sweets, most of them are flavoured with a mixture of cloves, cinnamon, nutmeg, cardamom and pepper). There is, to this day, a modest use of spices in savoury dishes. For instance the famous Frisian cheese that is studded with cloves. Cloves and nutmeg are often used in meat dishes and with game. But it is all very subtle.

I hope this answers your question. It is a very interesting topic, but it would require much more research on my part to give a full 'history of the spices in Dutch Cuisine' :smile:

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Braised beef, Dutch style

gallery_21505_1968_19120.jpg

First get your beef. This is about 1 pound of what's sold over here as 'lean stewing beef'. Cut the beef in pieces (or not, whatever you prefer) and season with salt and pepper.

gallery_21505_1968_30488.jpg

Melt 75 grams of butter in a pan that will accommodate all the beef lying flat.

Brown the beef over gentle heat.

Add water to come almost to the top of the beef.

gallery_21505_1968_34441.jpg

Now add 2 bayleaves and 2 cloves. And here comes the most difficult part.. (for me at least..) don't add anything else. Not a splash of wine, not a sliver of onion or garlic, not a whiff of any other herb or spice. Nothing. Really.

Make sure the meat simmers very gently (use a heat diffuser under the pan) and let simmer for about 3 hours.

It ends up looking like this.

gallery_21505_1968_63485.jpg

gallery_21505_1968_15962.jpg

It is now so tender that when you press a piece, it just falls into shreds. In Holland this dish is also known as 'draadjesvlees' which means 'thready meat'.

It tastes of meat that has been braised in butter.

My mother used to cook up a big pan of this about every 10 days, and then we would eat it for a couple of days in a row. We never got tired of it.. like you never tire of a plain roast chicken or a plain grilled steak. If you have good quality beef, this is really a preparation to let it shine - even if it isn't the prettiest of braises.

Serve with plain boiled potatoes or mash to soak up all the lovely gravy, and a vegetable - braised red cabbage, steamed green beans, brussel sprouts are all classic combinations.

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Hey Chufi:  still awaiting the answer to my question

on Dutch trading and where the spices went?

Milagai

Hi Milagai

yes I have been thinking about that... And I have to say that I am no expert on the history of Dutch Cooking or on the history of the spice trade.. so what follows is simply my own assumption about this matter.

It is true that the Netherlands played a major role in the spice trade in the 17th and 18th centuries.. and recipes from those days show the use of mace, nutmeg, cloves, sugar and cinnamon in both sweet and savoury dishes. The spices were expensive though so it was only a certain part of society that could benefit from this. They used it as a way to express their wealth.

The use of these spices in sweet dishes is still common (as you will see somewhere in the near future when I will start baking the December sweets, most of them are flavoured with a mixture of cloves, cinnamon, nutmeg, cardamom and pepper). There is, to this day, a modest use of spices in savoury dishes. For instance the famous Frisian cheese that is studded with cloves. Cloves and nutmeg are often used in meat dishes and with game. But it is all very subtle.

I hope this answers your question. It is a very interesting topic, but it would require much more research on my part to give a full 'history of the spices in Dutch Cuisine' :smile:

Thanks!

question deriving from yr answer above:

Is there some section of Dutch society (e.g. richer, with a mercantile history)

that have evolved dishes with greater use of spices?

Thanks again, in advance

Milagai

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OK . . . The beef in butter got me. I have got to try that. That beef looks like what we call chuck or shoulder. I am really intrigued with the concept of butter and beef. I can see why the minimalist approach with the spices makes sense.

I spent a bit of time in The Hague and Amsterdam the past three years and I never had anything like that. I kept looking for traditional dutch dishes and never found them in restaurants. Either I missed something or such a restaurant doesn't exist. I would ask around for recommendations for a cookbook on traditional Dutch cuisine and that always got a laugh. (I wanted to bring that back as a gift for my sister.) Why is that?

The pastry pictures have me drooling and I don't like sweets. :shock:

The fries with mayo made a convert of me. I have just about given up ketchup.

What really amazed me was the number of "Tex-Mex" places. They were particularly popular in Scheveningen. (I still can't pronounce it.) I had some wonderful "enchiladas" at one place. No, they weren't as spicy as I am used to and the cheese was probably Gouda. But they were lovely in their own way. I really did enjoy the more restrained use of spices.

Keep going Chufi!!!

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Great thread. As long as people are making requests, I'd like to see some fish dishes. Last year I was in Gorinchem, The Netherlands, for business and had a great whitefish meal and a sole dinner. There was also a great mushroom pastry -- the Dutch make great pastry overall, but the ones in this thread have been of the sweet variety. Their savory ones are terrific.

Chufi, one question for you: During my visit last year, I found carpaccio to be a common menu item nearly every place I went. In the U.S. we really only see carpaccio in Italian restaurants. But it was all over the place in Gorinchem. Is that common, or more of a trend of the moment?

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I spent a bit of time in The Hague and Amsterdam the past three years and I never had anything like that. I kept looking for traditional dutch dishes and never found them in restaurants. Either I missed something or such a restaurant doesn't exist. I would ask around for recommendations for a cookbook on traditional Dutch cuisine and that always got a laugh. (I wanted to bring that back as a gift for my sister.) Why is that?

The Dutch have always prided themselves in being tolerant of other cultures and habits.. all the way from centuries ago until now. Which means that today we are truly a 'multicultural' society, and we should be proud of that.. but along with that, taking pride in our own traditions seems to have suffered. It's not 'hip' or trendy to cook beef the way I demo'd here. For most people this type of cuisine is something they may remember from childhood but they want to forget about it.. I think mainly because they never had it the right way to begin with...

I don't know why it is that at the age of 36, I'm discovering a new appreciation for these dishes.. while I rebelled against them for most of the past 15 years.. it's very interesting.

I know of a couple of restaurants in Amsterdam that specialize in classic Dutch cuisine, with a modern twist. If you ever come this way again let me know and I can give you some info!

There are some good books. I will try to find out and let you know!

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Great thread.  As long as people are making requests, I'd like to see some fish dishes. 

Chufi, one question for you:  During my visit last year, I found carpaccio to be a common menu item nearly every place I went.  In the U.S. we really only see carpaccio in Italian restaurants.  But it was all over the place in Gorinchem.  Is that common, or more of a trend of the moment?

about the fish: sofar I have focused on the dishes I know well, the ones I grew up with.. Both my parents grew up on a farm and my father was a butcher for 40 years, so you can imagine fish was not a very important part of our diet.. I'll try to think of some traditional Dutch fish dishes though!

about the carpaccio: see also my reply to fifi, in the previous post.. the carpaccio is definitely everywhere and in the most horrible disguises.. it's one of those trends that has unfortunately become common practice... makes me so mad sometimes.

that's it for now, tomorrow I have to go and do my other job :shock:

This weekend will bring more recipes, I promise!

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Hey Chufi:  still awaiting the answer to my question

on Dutch trading and where the spices went?

Milagai

I think they went to Holland's Indonesian restaurants!

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Wow, thanks for doing this, Chufi! The weather is getting chilly here, and these dishes look wonderful. I want to ask you - I've made some delicious saucijzen broodjes, but I used a spice mix that I bought from a Dutch place online. I've seen a few recipes with just mace, nutmeg, salt and pepper, but this mix was quite lively, spicy, and utterly delicious. Do you have any recipe that might approximate the seasoning, so I can make it from scratch?

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Wow, wonderful to see such a thread. I'm dutch (but born in America) and love dutch food. Like our thread starter, I grew up on meat and potatoes every night, and I swore that the minute I moved out I would learn to cook different things, which probably explains why I often visit eGullet! And similar to Poffertjes, my family is from Pella, Iowa as well! Small world.

Some favourite dutch foods of mine:

1) All time favourite--erwrtensoep--dutch pea soup. This is a great dish...I'm traveling right now so can't post a recipe but maybe others can or I'll do it when I get back to NYC.

2) Gevuldekoek. Sorta flaky, chewy, filled with almond paste, just wonderful.

3) I'm surprised it hasn't been mentioned, but I love two "main course" dishes--boerenkool and hutspot. I love kale with potatoes and "rookworst" (smoked sausage)...wow. So underappreciated.

For those who are interested in sort of an in depth discussion of why the dutch, though travellers and certainly spice traders (Dutch East & West India Company), often eat rather bland food, there are some interesting writings on the subject. The culture (at least in the North) has been very Calvinist. A culture of "merchants and ministers" Calvinism is deeply rooted in the dutch psyche. Thus, flagrant use of money, and things sensual (including spices, etc.) were historically frowned upon. A great treatise on this is found in Simon Schama's "Embarassment of Riches" (A history of the dutch republic in its golden age). He goes into the whole influence of religion in Holland and its influence on art, food, etc. This is why much more interesting and (dare I say) "quality" food can be found in the South versus the North. (The southern park of Holland is predominantly Catholic and the northern part is Protestant).

Anyway, everybody, PROOST, and let's share some more recipes! I'll share some too when I get home this weekend to my cookbooks.


Edited by DutchMuse (log)

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I want to ask you - I've made some delicious  saucijzen broodjes, but I used a spice mix that I bought from a Dutch place online.  I've seen a few recipes with just mace, nutmeg, salt and pepper, but this mix was quite lively, spicy, and utterly delicious.  Do you have any recipe that might approximate the seasoning, so I can make it from scratch?

Abra, I don't know.. the saucijzenbroodjes I had were never spicy.. so I will have to look into that.

Do you have a link to the "Dutch place online"?

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Hi DutchMuse!

1) All time favourite--erwrtensoep--dutch pea soup. This is a great dish...I'm traveling right now so can't post a recipe but maybe others can or I'll do it when I get back to NYC.

I'd love to see your recipe, here's mine:

gallery_21505_358_1101931821.jpg

this is what goes into it.

500 gr. split peas

a couple of carrots

a small celeriac

3 fat leeks

a couple of potatoes

2 large onions

about 1 kilo pork ribs

a piece of salted pork

4 bayleaves

4 litres of water

smoked pork sausages

All the vegetables (diced and sliced into fairly small pieces) go into the pot together with the washed peas, water and the pork (exept the sausages). Simmer for 4 hours.. or so. Add some salt and pepper. Take the meat of the bones and leave the soup till the next day for the flavors to develop.

Next day, heat the sliced sausage in the soup, sprinkle with a little bit of celery leaf and serve..

with black ryebread, spread with mustard, with some katenspek (a kind of bacon that has been salted, boiled, smoked AND grilled).

gallery_21505_358_1102016823.jpg

3) I'm surprised it hasn't been mentioned, but I love two "main course" dishes--boerenkool and hutspot. I love kale with potatoes and "rookworst" (smoked sausage)...wow.  So underappreciated.

I love stamppot too.. so much that I gave it it's own thread! :smile: But you're right it does belong in this thread. Here's the linkStamppot

Calvinism is deeply rooted in the dutch psyche. Thus, flagrant use of money, and things sensual (including spices, etc.) were historically frowned upon.

Tahnks for this reply, it expresses what I wanted to say but somehow couldn't :smile:

Anyway, everybody, PROOST, and let's share some more recipes! I'll share some too when I get home this weekend to my cookbooks.

I'd love to hear about your Dutch cookbooks. Do you cook a lot from them or do you mainly use family recipes?

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The online store is Holland's Best, and what I used was the Verstegen Kroketten Kruiden. It came in a little bag, so I couldn't see the ingredients. They have tons of cool stuff there, but the service was a bit eccentric.

Your pea soup looks fabulous! That's a lot more meat that we put in pea soup here, and it looks so good, and so eGullet-y with all that pork!

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