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Good pastry brushes?


meredithla
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2 minutes ago, paulraphael said:

I recently got a few of the silicone brushes (some obscure Amazon brand)

Your experience tracks with mine. I ordered a pack of 4 generic silicone brushes for $6 about 5 years ago and have been happily using them since. I also got a more expensive, longer handled BBQ version but those little guys get the most use. The red one brushes garlic oil on focaccia so it’s restricted to savory applications,  blue is for sweet stuff only. Orange and green go wherever. 

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6 hours ago, paulraphael said:

I chose easy ... silicone goes in the dishwasher, so I can just grab whatever brush is on top. So far no regrets. They look like they'd be ineffectual and imprecise, but I don't find a practical difference. I'm not using them for anything where I have to worry about extreme evenness or visible brushstrokes. If you do that kind of thing, maybe get bristles just for that, and don't let anyone else use them. 

I’ve never found a silicon brush I liked, marinade never sticks to it so you can’t get the damned marinade from the bowl to the cooking meat. BBQs I use a few squares of paper towel rolled up and kinda jagged like as a brush then throw it away once it’s done. 

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53 minutes ago, EatingBen said:

I’ve never found a silicon brush I liked, marinade never sticks to it so you can’t get the damned marinade from the bowl to the cooking meat. BBQs I use a few squares of paper towel rolled up and kinda jagged like as a brush then throw it away once it’s done. 

I remember Barbara Tropp talking about their usefulness. Water waste  v. paper waste.I do it sometimes with phyllo - a lighter touch. (and I hate cleaning fats)

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Posted (edited)
3 hours ago, EatingBen said:

I’ve never found a silicon brush I liked, marinade never sticks to it so you can’t get the damned marinade from the bowl to the cooking meat. BBQs I use a few squares of paper towel rolled up and kinda jagged like as a brush then throw it away once it’s done. 

 

Huh. I've never used a brush with marinade. The only things I'll brush on the surface of roasting or grilling meats are fat-based, and those stick to a silicone bristle. 

Edited by paulraphael (log)

Notes from the underbelly

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21 hours ago, heidih said:

I remember Barbara Tropp talking about their usefulness. Water waste  v. paper waste.I do it sometimes with phyllo - a lighter touch. (and I hate cleaning fats)

Phyllo pastry? I’d never would have imagine it could stand up to that kind of thing. I look at phyllo wrong and it crumbles. 
 

19 hours ago, paulraphael said:

 

Huh. I've never used a brush with marinade. The only things I'll brush on the surface of roasting or grilling meats are fat-based, and those stick to a silicone bristle. 

‘hadn’t considered fats on silicon brushes, I use a spoon for basting in an oven as I find a brush doesn’t pick up enough and it brushes off the coating. 
 

i think this might be a case where everyone has their particulars from what they have learnt and learnt to manage. I’ll find a few brushes and next time try them for oil marinades and so forth and see if I get a better result for them. 

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15 minutes ago, EatingBen said:

Phyllo pastry? I’d never would have imagine it could stand up to that kind of thing. I look at phyllo wrong and it crumbles. 
 

Having been around phyllo since chidhood I think I move very fast with a light touch. My sister was visiting and made strudel for my dad w/ brush and it was a mess and too much butter. I've never even done that "cover with slightly damp cloth or it will dry out". As with pie dough or puff pastry I imagine your experience and muscle memory factor in. Also "no fear!" - Hesitation does not bode well and it repairs beautifully ;)

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36 minutes ago, EatingBen said:

Phyllo pastry? I’d never would have imagine it could stand up to that kind of thing. I look at phyllo wrong and it crumbles

It may be that it has not been stored well or even stored too long before it came into your kitchen. 

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12 hours ago, heidih said:

Having been around phyllo since chidhood I think I move very fast with a light touch. My sister was visiting and made strudel for my dad w/ brush and it was a mess and too much butter. I've never even done that "cover with slightly damp cloth or it will dry out". As with pie dough or puff pastry I imagine your experience and muscle memory factor in. Also "no fear!" - Hesitation does not bode well and it repairs beautifully ;)

Every time I’ve tried to do anything I think the phyllo assumes I’m terrified and starts turning to dust. I would love a good strudel, it’s been a few years since I’ve had a good one. 

 

12 hours ago, Anna N said:

It may be that it has not been stored well or even stored too long before it came into your kitchen. 

I hadn’t considered that, next time I’m at the busy store I’ll take a look and see what I can find. I wouldn’t mind trying a few desserts. 

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Posted (edited)
On 5/25/2022 at 9:56 AM, rrigreid said:

This is the third pastry brush I'm using to brush simple syrup in my cakes and the hairs on the brush come off and stick to the cake. is there a pastry brush you own that doesn't shed its hair? I am willing to pay big bucks for a good one instead of these ones I get at the grocery store. This last one was from Sur La Table too. I'm taking it back. Please share your tips if you have something else you use to brush syrup into cakes with if you don't use a brush also. Thanks a bunch!!!!!!!!

I agree with  @EatingBen  re bristle brushes. My main basting brush is a 1 1/2-inch bristle brush from an art store. I once was an art teacher in high school.  I have had it so long the ferrel cracked and fell of the handle but never a lost a bristle.  A little Gorilla glue and it is back in service.I keep it clean by using dish washing soap alone at first.  If there is no water at first, he soap will emulsify any oil in the mixture you used if you scrub it in the palm of your hand and take care to work it all the way down to the base of the bristles.  Then wash out the soap with warm water.  ( when I was in elementary school some guy came to class. I don't remember anything he said except to not wash brushes in hot water because it will make the hair fall out) I don't think that applies too much any more.  Good quality art brushes are made better than that but to this day I don't use hot water on brushes.  For a long time I was afraid to use hot water when I shampooed in the shower. :)  I have tried silicone brushes and don't like them. The glob on the baste instead of giving a more controlled baste.

Edited by Norm Matthews (log)
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1 hour ago, Norm Matthews said:

I agree with  @EatingBen  re bristle brushes. My main basting brush is a 1 1/2-inch bristle brush from an art store. I once was an art teacher in high school.  I have had it so long the ferrel cracked and fell of the handle but never a lost a bristle.  A little Gorilla glue and it is back in service.I keep it clean by using dish washing soap alone at first.  If there is no water at first, he soap will emulsify any oil in the mixture you used if you scrub it in the palm of your hand and take care to work it all the way down to the base of the bristles.  Then wash out the soap with warm water.  ( when I was in elementary school some guy came to class. I don't remember anything he said except to not wash brushes in hot water because it will make the hair fall out) I don't think that applies too much any more.  Good quality art brushes are made better than that but to this day I don't use hot water on brushes.  For a long time I was afraid to use hot water when I shampooed in the shower. :)  I have tried silicone brushes and don't like them. The glob on the baste instead of giving a more controlled baste.

I have an Oxo natural bristle brush that is at least 25 years old; I use it for everything and it's never shed.  I do not put it in the d/w.  Tried the silicone type and they suck.

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