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shelora

Artisanal bread in Mexico

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Natural levain bread baked in brick ovens. Yippee!

A bakery outlet in Puebla and in Oaxaca City. Click on the "pan" to reveal all.

Pan

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!Que maravilla!

Theabroma


Sharon Peters aka "theabroma"

The lunatics have overtaken the asylum

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Yes, it's great that there is good bread. But what about some Mexican breads? These are all European.

Rachel


Rachel Caroline Laudan

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Yes, it's great that there is good bread.  But what about some Mexican breads?  These are all European. 

Rachel

I'd like to know if they will be doing some pan de muerto. I'm going to find out.

s

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Yes, it's great that there is good bread.  But what about some Mexican breads?  These are all European. 

Rachel

I'd like to know if they will be doing some pan de muerto. I'm going to find out.

s

I received a repy from one of the owner/bakers, Christian Hackl, and the company does seasonal breads throughout the year in keeping with Mexican traditions. This month, October, they are producing Pan de Muerto along with some Fall/harvest specialites like pan de calabaza con sus semillas.

I'm looking forward to seeing and tasting their rosca de los reyes when I'm in Oaxaca.

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Thank God they´re not in el DF...I´d replace "the fat guy" in no time!

There is a great portuguese panadaria here but it´s safely far away from me in Polanco.

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Because of this posting, I had the pleasure to discover and enjoy bread from Panetco here in Oaxaca while waiting to go to the Lucha Libre!

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Because of this posting, I had the pleasure to discover and enjoy bread from Panetco here in Oaxaca while waiting to go to the Lucha Libre!

I was there this morning and tried their blue cheese and pear foccaccio - I felt like eating the entire thing,

Currently working at Cocina Magica in the courtyard of La Mano Magica on Alcala.

Sorry we sold out of the organic rabbit confit today, I wish you could have tried it.

Actually I hope you come in a try some of our food.

Cheers,

Shelora

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Hmm like the old days

Thanks for the link

An excellent point, Caro. At this point it is a bit of a slippery slope for me because I think of all wheat flour based bread as European ... but certainly these crusty loaves of pain au levain are.

What of the "original" wheat bakeries in Mexico? Are you referring to things like pan de pulque, etc?

I have a lovely little book on the bread making traditions in San Juan Huatzinco, Tlaxcala. Apparently it is believed that if a drunk approaches the oven as the risen loaves are being loaded, they will collapse. To counter this they traditionally built ovens with whiskey bottles in their foundations to ward off the evil powers of the drunkard.

There must be a million such beliefs out there regarding this strange European stuff.

Theabroma


Sharon Peters aka "theabroma"

The lunatics have overtaken the asylum

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Hmm like the old days

Thanks for the link

An excellent point, Caro. At this point it is a bit of a slippery slope for me because I think of all wheat flour based bread as European ... but certainly these crusty loaves of pain au levain are.

What of the "original" wheat bakeries in Mexico? Are you referring to things like pan de pulque, etc?

I have a lovely little book on the bread making traditions in San Juan Huatzinco, Tlaxcala. Apparently it is believed that if a drunk approaches the oven as the risen loaves are being loaded, they will collapse. To counter this they traditionally built ovens with whiskey bottles in their foundations to ward off the evil powers of the drunkard.

There must be a million such beliefs out there regarding this strange European stuff.

Theabroma

To continue with the wheat thread, every two weeks, women come down from the Sierra Juarez and deliver freshly made whole wheat tortillas to the restaurant. They are oversized and of amazing quality. Like nothing I've ever tried before. We dry them and then toast them up so they are super super crispy. They are part of our table tostadas along with yellow and blue corn tortillas, served with a salsa made with the smoked chile pasilla of Oaxaca.

Two years ago during a trip up to the Mixteca Alta, in Santiago Apoala, we came across tortillas made with a mix of corn and wheat. Again, like nothing I've ever had.

So while wheat maybe of European roots, it is being used in traditional ways here in Oaxaca.

I think Pan&co is a wonderful addition to the city. Their product is outstanding.

s

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Panetco is now offereing bread and pastry making classes. Anyone hanging out it Puebla can take advantage of a day class. Here is the latest schedule. Cursos

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A Mexican friend and hotelier (horticulturist, bon vivant) here in Pátzcuaro, Alfredo, has just told us of the reknowned panaderías artesanales in the area of "Los Once Pueblos", between Cherapan and Zamora, Michoacán. We were in that area Monday, on a visit to the Fábrica de Salsa Purhépecha, in Chilchota, but we missed the bakeries. Now, after hearing Alfredo's descriptions, not only of the breads, but of the unique regional cuisine, we are determined to return soon for a more extended stay.

Chilchota and Salsa Purhépecha

(I also need to go back and get better photos)

Buen provecho,

Panosmex


Buen provecho, Panosmex

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I've just returned (last night!) from one of my chocolate tours to Mexico. While in Oaxaca, I took our group to Pasteleria Rome where Jorge Rocha, the owner, demonstrated his methods for making conchas, bisquets (my favorites) and his extraordinary pan de yema. Everything he makes is fabulous because he incorporates the finest ingredients with skillful bread-making techniques. And his desserts (for which he's best known) are equally wonderful. His Tres Leches cake is out of this world.

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