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bone-in rib eye


annachan
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Just got some great bone-in rib eye from Safeway yesterday (on sale for $4.99/lb) and want to get some help on cooking them. They're about an inch or so thick and about a lb each. My prefer method would be to cook them on stove top and finish them in the oven. I don't have a cast iron pan. I'll probably use my cooper bottom stainless steel pan.

So, I like to get some guidelines on:

What oil? Canola or olive?

How how should the pan be before I put the steak in it?

How long should I cook the steak on the first side? The second?

When do I put it in the oven? Temp? How long?

I'm really new at cooking steak at home, so I appreciate any advice you have. TIA :raz:

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Just got some great bone-in rib eye from Safeway yesterday (on sale for $4.99/lb) and want to get some help on cooking them. They're about an inch or so thick and about a lb each. My prefer method would be to cook them on stove top and finish them in the oven. I don't have a cast iron pan. I'll probably use my cooper bottom stainless steel pan.

So, I like to get some guidelines on:

What oil? Canola or olive?

How how should the pan be before I put the steak in it?

How long should I cook the steak on the first side? The second?

When do I put it in the oven? Temp? How long?

I'm really new at cooking steak at home, so I appreciate any advice you have. TIA  :raz:

You can get a lot of opinions on the answers, but I'd suggest you invest in a cast iron pan if you plan on doing steaks regularly... they're not too expensive.

As to the oil, canola, as olive oil has a lower smoke point.

medium high ??? but watch hot spots...

About 2 minutes a side ??? You want it to start to brown.... but no so long as you're cooking the steak.

I keep my oven at 400 for steaks, but how long is really the trick. You need an instant read thermometer, and you should reach about 130 for medium rare. I'd do about 4 minutes on side one, and then flip.

When the steaks are done to your likeness, wrap in foil and let sit for about 20 minutes before serving. Remember the internal temperature will continue to rise during this rest.

BTW, are the handles on your pan oven safe? are you planning on moving the steaks to some other pan, if so, how thick is that? Are you going to make a pan sauce?

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I never really got the whole "sear quickly, then put in the oven" thing. Does quick searing over high heat produce a differnt *kind* of sear to longer searing over lower heat? If not, why not just lower the heat, avoid a lot of the smoke, avoid having to turn on your oven and just sear for longer? The only time I ever use a smoking hot sear is when I have Wagyu or some similar cut of steak in which I want the outside intensely crusted and the centre pretty much blue.

If you want a truely excellent crust, don't wash your meat, sprinkle with salt about 30 minutes before cooking, and then sear over medium-low heat in a pool of butter. You get a wonderful, brown crust you can't get any other way.

PS: I am a guy.

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I second UnConundrum's points.

Cast Iron pans are cheap so you should get one for just such an occasion as cheap meat. Fry the meat in the same pan that will go in the oven. Use that pan at the end for sauce while you have the steak resting.

Grapeseed oil is good for frying at high temps. Salt and pepper the steak only. Put a pat or two of butter on top of the steak right before it goes into the oven.

Get the pan good and hot (350+ degrees). Get a good sear on the meat and turn when it loosens up from the pan. I don't use a thermometer, I use the touch test to determine how rare I want it. Just remember that the meat continues to cook after you take it out so it should come out of the oven a bit under done.

There are a couple of recent steak threads so just search back a few pages for more opinions all of which are good.

Cheers,

Bob

My Photography: Bob Worthington Photography

 

My music: Coronado Big Band
 

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I never really got the whole "sear quickly, then put in the oven" thing. Does quick searing over high heat produce a differnt *kind* of sear to longer searing over lower heat? If not, why not just lower the heat, avoid a lot of the smoke, avoid having to turn on your oven and just sear for longer? The only time I ever use a smoking hot sear is when I have Wagyu or some similar cut of steak in which I want the outside intensely crusted and the centre pretty much blue.

If you want a truely excellent crust, don't wash your meat, sprinkle with salt about 30 minutes before cooking, and then sear over medium-low heat in a pool of butter. You get a wonderful, brown crust you can't get any other way.

Just a quick reply here...if you have your steak on medium-low aren't you esentially cooking it rather than searing it? Doesn't more heat go into the steak (thus cooking it) at this temp before the desired sear is attained? Isn't the object of a quick sear to form the crust as quickly as possible before cooking the inside? It's so fast that if you stop at the sear and cut the meat, the inside is still cool to the touch? Just askin.

There are many schools of thought that all produce the results wanted. Which method you choose is purely subjective and based on personal tastes. I, for one, like the sear-fast-at-high-temp-and-put-into-the-oven method.

:biggrin:

My Photography: Bob Worthington Photography

 

My music: Coronado Big Band
 

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Just a quick reply here...if you have your steak on medium-low aren't you esentially cooking it rather than searing it?  Doesn't more heat go into the steak (thus cooking it) at this temp before the desired sear is attained?  Isn't the object of a quick sear to form the crust as quickly as possible before cooking the inside?  It's so fast that if you stop at the sear and cut the meat, the inside is still cool to the touch?  Just askin.

There are many schools of thought that all produce the results wanted.  Which method you choose is purely subjective and based on personal tastes.  I, for one, like the sear-fast-at-high-temp-and-put-into-the-oven method.

:biggrin:

Not that low, bit a pleasant sizzle instead of turn-the-smoke-alarms-off-and-open-every-window. I can get why you want a high sear if you need the meat very rare in the middle. What I don't get is searing on high and then putting the meat in the oven because the centre isn't done yet.

PS: I am a guy.

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I never really got the whole "sear quickly, then put in the oven" thing. Does quick searing over high heat produce a differnt *kind* of sear to longer searing over lower heat? If not, why not just lower the heat, avoid a lot of the smoke, avoid having to turn on your oven and just sear for longer? The only time I ever use a smoking hot sear is when I have Wagyu or some similar cut of steak in which I want the outside intensely crusted and the centre pretty much blue.

If you want a truely excellent crust, don't wash your meat, sprinkle with salt about 30 minutes before cooking, and then sear over medium-low heat in a pool of butter. You get a wonderful, brown crust you can't get any other way.

Salt does add a great crust to foods but I can tell you the fast hot sear and then into a hot oven works wonders on steaks and even boneless chicken breasts. I get the most moist juicy results this way with a nice crust. The after cooking rest is also very important to help retain the juices in the meat.

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Shalmanese's very French approach is the one I most often use, and it does produce a nice crust (maybe it's the butter, not the heat). It's hard to fit more than one or two steaks into a skillet, however, so if you're cooking for a crowd, your only option might be to finish the steaks in the oven. One advantage of the French approach is that it gives you the basis for a tasty sauce: while the steaks are resting, pour out most of the fat in the skillet; then, in the remaining fat and over medium low heat, soften some finely chopped shallot; pour in a half cup or so of white wine, raise the heat, and reduce while scraping the skillet to free any "caramelized adherences" (an Olneyism); when the wine is reduced to a syrupy spoonful or two, remove the skillet from the heat and stir in small pieces of cold butter; spoon the sauce over the generously seasoned steaks and serve.

Edited by carswell (log)
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Just got some great bone-in rib eye from Safeway yesterday (on sale for $4.99/lb)

Not to be too cynical, but I would question whether the meat is that good to begin with. Safeway and Giant sometimes sell USDA "Good" grade (less fat, less marbling) at a discount; the steaks are tough. Doesn't matter how you cook them unless you braise them. If they're actually choice grade, I would go with the recommendations to cook them all the way through on medium or medium high heat for 3 minutes per side, flipping every 3 minutes. Flip whenever you see beeds of juice on the top surface. After about 10-12 minutes, it should be done. Salt after the first flip. Add pepper after the second-to-last flip.

He who distinguishes the true savor of his food can never be a glutton; he who does not cannot be otherwise. --- Henry David Thoreau
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Just got some great bone-in rib eye from Safeway yesterday (on sale for $4.99/lb)

Not to be too cynical, but I would question whether the meat is that good to begin with. Safeway and Giant sometimes sell USDA "Good" grade (less fat, less marbling) at a discount; the steaks are tough. Doesn't matter how you cook them unless you braise them. If they're actually choice grade, I would go with the recommendations to cook them all the way through on medium or medium high heat for 3 minutes per side, flipping every 3 minutes. Flip whenever you see beeds of juice on the top surface. After about 10-12 minutes, it should be done. Salt after the first flip. Add pepper after the second-to-last flip.

The steak I got are the Rancher Reserves, and have a good layer of fat on the side and nice marbling throughout. I really rarely shop at Safeway and like stores (less than once a month). I only got the steaks because they did look really good.

Thanks everyone for your advice. Just took the steaks out of the fridge to take the chill off and will cook them up for dinner for the husband and I tonight. Will report back on how they turn out. :biggrin:

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When Safeway sends out their sale paper each week, they often have specials that look like a real bargain. They never mention the fact that the meat is select grade rather than choice. Needless to say, I rarely buy meat there.

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I am a fan of the sear/in-oven technique using cast iron. While originally I used to say BBQ is the only way but since I've been without one (I'm in an apartment) and opted for this method I've come to really like the flavourful crust and even cooking when using cast iron.

Alton Brown's method of putting a cast iron into a 500 degree oven until the oven reaches temp, then placing on a high heat stovetop to then sear 2 minutes/side and oven-finish works quite well. With something like a ribeye you probably won't notice the difference though if you just seared it 2-3 minutes per side over med-high, then finished for 5 minutes in a 400 degree oven.

With the bone in, your cooking times may be a little longer. A thermometer would be handy.

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I use a cast iron pan, old and black, cover the bottom of the pan with kosher salt and on high heat wait for the salt to begin to brown. Put the dry steak on the salt without any oil or anything and sear, turn and enjoy. It doesn't turn out salty at all :biggrin:

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The steaks came out pretty good the other night, but definitely could be better. One of the problem was that my pan wasn't really big enough. I did manage to sqeeze both steaks into the pan, but could have used more room. The steak didn't brown as much as I like. The other small problem was that I left the steak in the oven for too long. I did 4 minutes on each side when 3 minutes would probably have been enough. My steak wasn't over cooked, it was just medium to medium well, versus what I like, medium rare.

I'm still debating on the cast iron pan. I had one before, but never quite got the seasoning part right. I know it can be a great asset in the kitchen....but it's also just so heavy. For now, I'm looking to get a larger version of what I have, the stainless steel pan with copper bottom.

Again, thanks everyone for your help. I have 3 more packs of rib eye in the freezer to help perfect my steak cooking method. BTW, the rib eye was pretty good for Safeway meat. :wink:

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I never really got the whole "sear quickly, then put in the oven" thing. Does quick searing over high heat produce a differnt *kind* of sear to longer searing over lower heat? If not, why not just lower the heat, avoid a lot of the smoke, avoid having to turn on your oven and just sear for longer? The only time I ever use a smoking hot sear is when I have Wagyu or some similar cut of steak in which I want the outside intensely crusted and the centre pretty much blue.

If you want a truely excellent crust, don't wash your meat, sprinkle with salt about 30 minutes before cooking, and then sear over medium-low heat in a pool of butter. You get a wonderful, brown crust you can't get any other way.

Could not agree with you more. High heat drop to med, butter, cast iron. I lately have been doing ribeye Wagyu which I find works best if it is diced before quick high heat(45 sec. mind you I eat it raw a lot) with butter. Shalmanese please do not make me drool, tell me you are not getting Snake River RANCH Wagyu.

Edit: Thank you for using Wagyu and not Kobe in your description. Interesting article from our own Russ Parsons in the LA.Times http://www.latimes.com/features/food/la-fo...1,3032004.story

Edited by M.X.Hassett (log)
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<-- Points to location.

The Wagyu I get is from our local farmers market. It costs around $30USD per lb and is phenomenally marbled. I've ranted enough on these boards about Kobe vs Wagyu to make that mistake for myself. I think Australia is a lot more scrupulous about the naming than the US.

PS: I am a guy.

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An intercontinental discourse. Very cool.

I can recommend the links to other eGullet threads with great enthusiasm.

And my 2cts worth on a preferred method that minimises smokeage:

- cast iron pan, medium heat

- 50/50 oil and butter, unsalted!!

- meat at room temp

- seasoned

- lay meat in oil/butter 30 seconds, then flip

- spoon oil/butter on steak while searing for 30 seconds,

- flip and spoon for another 30 seconds

- continue for about 7 minutes

- rest under foil for 5 minutes

should be a medium rare, slightly red closer to the bone

this method was policy in a couple places i've worked at, where steak was not a constant on the menu and was only served when good cuts came about

apparently heston blumenthal does something similar

so does fatguy!

"Coffee and cigarettes... the breakfast of champions!"

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Matt Xav, that's a BIG question, warranting a thread all its own, and there probably is one, but its early and I couldn't be stuffed searching.

My answer is Olive Oil. Not Extra Virgin, not infused with anything sexy or nuthin'... If that's not on hand, then peanut oil is good.

And by season, yeah, sea salt flakes and ground black pepper.

As an aside, if doing the rib-eye, t-bone etc on a charcoal/woodfired grill/broiler... I'd do the following:

A few hours before, grab a bunch of rosemary/thyme, tie together to make a brush, and soak in EVOO. The only time I'd use EVOO for steak, cooking one anyway. When the meat's come up to room temp, brush with the oil, and slap 'em on the grill. Rotate 90 degrees after a minute or so, brush. Flip, brush. Rotate, brush, Flip, brush, you get the idea, then check by pressing on the meat for doneness. Resting should be for 5 minutes, covered under foil.

If steak bone in is cooked as above, I like to serve with a fresh bowl of infused EVOO, and a good wedge of lemon for each person. It's a bit of a variant on a Bistecca Fiorentina.

"Coffee and cigarettes... the breakfast of champions!"

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