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L'Ami Louis is owned by Thierry de la Brosse, a French businessman, who also owns "Aux Lyonnais", with Alain Ducasse. Apparently, a few years back, Louis was having some financial problems, and had to sell off "les murs", meaning, litterally "the walls", or the building structure, and business. De La Brosse also owns, in part, Dutournier's new venture, "Pinxo". I've also heard that he is head of Amnesty International France, but there may be someone else with the same name as well...

Edited by fresh_a (log)

Anti-alcoholics are unfortunates in the grip of water, that terrible poison, so corrosive that out of all substances it has been chosen for washing and scouring, and a drop of water added to a clear liquid like Absinthe, muddles it." ALFRED JARRY

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The owner and the director of Amnesty International France are the same: "Le 6 décembre [1999], Thierry de la Brosse a pris ses fonctions de directeur de la section française. Marié, père de quatre enfants de 20 à 13 ans, il a été recruté au cours d'un processus de plusieurs mois avec l'assistance d'un cabinet de "chasseurs de têtes". Il a une expérience de banquier d'affaires et d'industriel, et a travaillé une douzaine d'années en Angleterre et aux Etats-Unis. A cinquante ans, il souhaitait quitter le monde de l'argent et consacrer aux autres le reste de sa vie professionnelle. Alors qu'Amnesty va renforcer son action sur les acteurs économiques, il est intéressant d'avoir un directeur issu du monde des entreprises."

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Merci pour la confirmation!

Anti-alcoholics are unfortunates in the grip of water, that terrible poison, so corrosive that out of all substances it has been chosen for washing and scouring, and a drop of water added to a clear liquid like Absinthe, muddles it." ALFRED JARRY

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  • 1 year later...
has anyone been recently??????????????????????????????

I have not been in a number of years but Peter Mayle has a pretty good write up of it in Acquired Tastes, http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/055...5/egulletcom-20 :wink:

thx, but was hoping someone from here had been very recently & could report. i haven't been in a couple of years.

its expensive, but it has that je ne sais quoi that is very hard to find. this place & joe's stone crab in south beach may be my 2 favorite restaurants in the entire world!!

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I have, but, if you've been there before, you know it's the place that NEVER changes. Same staff. Same foie gras, steak/poulet roti, pyramidal pomme frites, and selection of fruit for dessert. Same huge bill. Same American tourist-trap (at times).

Anti-alcoholics are unfortunates in the grip of water, that terrible poison, so corrosive that out of all substances it has been chosen for washing and scouring, and a drop of water added to a clear liquid like Absinthe, muddles it." ALFRED JARRY

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I have, but, if you've been there before, you know it's the place that NEVER changes. Same staff. Same foie gras, steak/poulet roti, pyramidal pomme frites, and selection of fruit for dessert. Same huge bill. Same American tourist-trap (at times).

merci! i go every time in paris. to me, it is the quintessential bistro. yes, the perfection of the samesness is what draws me back. the amazing high prices keeps out a lot of tourists, so the clientele is "normally" comprised of many french regulars, many celeb regulars, & many wealthy american regulars which signify frequent visits to paris, not the 1-timers (generally speaking, of course). the 1-timers i know who have gone generally do NOT like the place: too rude, too brusque, too expensive. hopefully, L'Ami Louis will keep there sameness!!!

btw: fruit for dessert :laugh:

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I have, but, if you've been there before, you know it's the place that NEVER changes. Same staff. Same foie gras, steak/poulet roti, pyramidal pomme frites, and selection of fruit for dessert. Same huge bill. Same American tourist-trap (at times).

I hate to be a spoil-sport, but I agree with fresh_a - bottom line - why?

John Talbott

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merci! i go every time in paris. to me, it is the quintessential bistro. yes, the perfection of the samesness is what draws me back. the amazing high prices keeps out a lot of tourists, so the clientele is "normally" comprised of many french regulars, many celeb regulars, & many wealthy american regulars which signify frequent visits to paris, not the 1-timers (generally speaking, of course). the 1-timers i know who have gone generally do NOT like the place: too rude, too brusque, too expensive. hopefully, L'Ami Louis will keep there sameness!!!

btw: fruit for dessert  :laugh:

A few years ago figaro had an article about l'ami Louis.

The author tried many times to make a reservation and he got nowhere.He then tried a new approach ,he asked an american friend to make it and to his great surprise the reservation was easily obtained under his american friend's name.

The review praised the quality of the ingredients and indicated that the majority of

the diners were tourists.He said the cost was equal to a rd trip to New york.

He felt it was not a bad deal ,since beeing there made you feel like beeing in New york.

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merci! i go every time in paris. to me, it is the quintessential bistro. yes, the perfection of the samesness is what draws me back. the amazing high prices keeps out a lot of tourists, so the clientele is "normally" comprised of many french regulars, many celeb regulars, & many wealthy american regulars which signify frequent visits to paris, not the 1-timers (generally speaking, of course). the 1-timers i know who have gone generally do NOT like the place: too rude, too brusque, too expensive. hopefully, L'Ami Louis will keep there sameness!!!

btw: fruit for dessert  :laugh:

A few years ago figaro had an article about l'ami Louis.

The author tried many times to make a reservation and he got nowhere.He then tried a new approach ,he asked an american friend to make it and to his great surprise the reservation was easily obtained under his american friend's name.

The review praised the quality of the ingredients and indicated that the majority of

the diners were tourists.He said the cost was equal to a rd trip to New york.

He felt it was not a bad deal ,since beeing there made you feel like beeing in New york.

LOL :biggrin::rolleyes: merci for a big belly laugh :smile:

the many stories, articles, word-of-mouths antedotes, pertaining to l'ami louis's polices are all funny & probably true. but oddly or maybe having no agenda, or the "luck of the draw/night-being-there" i have not had that experience. my french relatives made the reservation without hitches & WITH KIDS, all tables were filled with either "celebs" (kevin kline, omar shariff, models, etc...) & what appeared to be french-speaking regulars.

don't misinterpret me - IT IS AMAZINGLY EXPENSIVE - IT CAN BE BRUSQUE - RESERVATIONS CAN BE SENSITIVE!!!

i am not an advertisement, but the # of times i have been, i had a thoroughly enjoyable time. my pocket was always a lot lighter, but for some inexplicable reason i am drawn back.

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I am a Brazilian food writer and I am off to Paris on Wednesday to write a feature story on l'Ami Louis, coincidently. In fact, I am trying to find out more about its history, owners and chefs, and any help would be greatly appreciated.

thanks!

Alexandra Forbes

www.alexandraforbes.com

Alexandra Forbes

Brazilian food and travel writer, @aleforbes on Twitter

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I am a Brazilian food writer and I am off to Paris on Wednesday to write a feature story on l'Ami Louis, coincidently. In fact, I am trying to find out more about its history, owners and chefs, and any help would be greatly appreciated.

thanks!

Alexandra Forbes

www.alexandraforbes.com

Far be it to me to tell you how to research these areas, but you may find Calvin (Bud) Trillin's article in Gourmet recently about RW (Johnnie) Apple Jr's 70th Birthday party at l'Ami Louis to be of some aid. In addition, the first English version of Gault-Millau (1964) published by Julliard tells a bit of M and Mme Antoine and the second, if I'm correct, published in 1969 by Random House (while M Magnin was still alive and kicking) has some info of interest, as is the 1982 edition (Crown/Knapp) when he was 82 years old - ergo born in 1900.

Otherwise I'm afraid, it's off to the library.

John Talbott

blog John Talbott's Paris

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This is one place my husband (who is French) and I are absolutely divided about. I really love this place because it was one of the first restaurants I went to in Paris not on a student budget, and it exactly matched my naive, romanticized idea of a Paris bistro (albeit with a much higher pricetag). The one thing that did strike me was the portions were very un-French (i.e., HUGE). I have been here a few times since, and perhaps because it is exactly as I remember it, I am always happy with the experience. I wanted to go here because I had read so many articles in various magazines about it, and also several interviews of people (famous, of course) who listed it as their favorite restaurant in Paris. I guess my pleasure has more to do with nostalgia, and the rememberence of the feeling of being able to afford (just) to go to such a place.

My husband really dislikes this place...not hate, but thinks that it is good place that would be great if it was one quarter of the price, and not so, in his view, contrived.

It is true that it is always filled with a dispropotionate number of Americans and recognizable faces. I don't know about difficultly of reservations, but usually book through the concierge at our hotel, who seems to be able to get a table easily, even though it is last minute.

Is it a place I would recommend, probabaly not. Paris is full of places where the food is better, atmosphere is better at a fraction of the cost.

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Here is the profile of the idividual that will like L'ami Louis.

-you don't like surprises in food.

-you like your food to be simple

-you like huge portions

-rudeness does not bother you(we all know about the parisians,right?)

-tables close to each other brings intimacy

-you are impressed to be in a famous restaurant

-you feel great to be across perhaps from a celebrity.

-you are rich or hope to be one

-loud voices from fellow americans makes you feel at home

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Here is the profile of the idividual that will like L'ami Louis.

-you don't like surprises in food.

-you like your food to be simple

-you like huge portions

-rudeness does not bother you(we all know about the parisians,right?)

-tables close to each other brings intimacy

-you are impressed to be in a famous restaurant

-you feel great  to be across perhaps from a celebrity.

-you are rich or hope to be one

-loud voices from fellow americans makes you feel at home

should let your comments pass, but just can't. its clear u either have an "ax" re: this bistro, which is ok; or, more likely, u have a very myopic view of not only "tout le monde", but of those who frequent this bistro.

your comments are so off-base, it would be a waste of time to spend any time refuting or enlightening you. its probably better to let u wallow in your own brand of s_______y (fill n the blank if u're intellectually capable)

Edited by jgould (log)
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Here is the profile of the idividual that will like L'ami Louis.

-you don't like surprises in food.

-you like your food to be simple

-you like huge portions

-rudeness does not bother you(we all know about the parisians,right?)

-tables close to each other brings intimacy

-you are impressed to be in a famous restaurant

-you feel great  to be across perhaps from a celebrity.

-you are rich or hope to be one

-loud voices from fellow americans makes you feel at home

should let your comments pass, but just can't. its clear u either have an "ax" re: this bistro, which is ok; or, more likely, u have a very myopic view of not only "tout le monde", but of those who frequent this bistro.

your comments are so off-base, it would be a waste of time to spend any time refuting or enlightening you. its probably better to let u wallow in your own brand of s_______y (fill n the blank if u're intellectually capable)

I don't think so. Pierre's comments are very objective with only the slightest amount of subjectivity. You notice how he doesn't comment on the quality of the ingredients (which no one can argue is great) and the only "knock" is that Pierre doesn't sound like he agrees with the lofty prices.

Bravo for Pierre for telling it like it is. L'Ami Louis might be the world's greatest bistro, but he is giving you the insight into what to expect and for that he must be congratulated.

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Here is the profile of the idividual that will like L'ami Louis.

-you don't like surprises in food.

-you like your food to be simple

-you like huge portions

-rudeness does not bother you(we all know about the parisians,right?)

-tables close to each other brings intimacy

-you are impressed to be in a famous restaurant

-you feel great  to be across perhaps from a celebrity.

-you are rich or hope to be one

-loud voices from fellow americans makes you feel at home

I can see where one may get offended at this reply Pierre. I know you probably meant it tongue in cheek...

But it reminds me of an incident in a restaurant, Le Grande Cascade. It was a young lady's birthday ( approximately 16) and the entire famille was celebrating. The father became very drunk, loud, and beligerant. The young lady started crying, wheras his mother, a more mature lady of about 70 something, scolded him and led him out by the ear! The waiters were very apologetic for the scene and truly that is the only loud table I have encountered in Paris and I must say they weren't American and the nice waiters were French.

Paris is a mood...a longing you didn't know you had, until it was answered.

-An American in Paris

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The almost black and white opinions on L'Ami Louis underscore the real necessity to "know yourself" when it comes to picking a restaurant. I find it interesting that there have been almost no lukewarm or neutral opinions on L'AL, only those who find it the quintessential bistrot and those who find it, well, precisely not that.

Perhaps Pierre's comments are best taken by the uninitiated as a flag that they collect more opinion, or walk in, presumably to make a reservation, and survey the scene and ambiance before committing to a table here. Actually, whenever time allows, we do that before booking any new address regardless of its reviews.

eGullet member #80.

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I DID NOT MEAN TO OFFEND ANY ONE by my personal observations about L'ami louis.The points that i raised are not negative. As human beeings we are all different and enjoy life differently.One is not a lesser person because one likes simple food ,or one feels good because there is a celebrity.Also beeing loud is just an indication of beeing happy ,specially when silence in public is not equated with high breed which may be the case with some societies.

Every thing i said was factual based on many visits,fortunately as a guest.

I also had a good time.

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