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bleudauvergne

Cooking with 'The Cooking of Southwest France'

379 posts in this topic

Klary, your madeleines look way better than mine do. I'm afraid that it's my pan, which is a new mini-madeleine. I'm thinking that the little ridges are too tiny to really make a good impression on the dough. Bummer! But the texture of these madeleines is very nice, and we too talked abiout wanting more orange flavor next time.

I made my annual batch of quince paste at the same time I was doing the madeleines, so we were on the same wavelength.

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Made the eggplant & garlic dish. Super. I used the Herbes de la Garrigue. It's so simple to make even my DILs will enjoy making it.

But did I read the directions right? Wrap each piece in foil separately? As I was only doing a test run for 1 serving, that's what I did. Next time when I make a larger amount, I will put them in a gratin dish covered with foil, then uncover briefly before taking out of the oven. (I don't like having my food right on foil.)


"Half of cooking is thinking about cooking." ---Michael Roberts

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Made the eggplant & garlic dish. Super. I used the Herbes de la Garrigue. It's so simple to make even my DILs will enjoy making it.

But did I read the directions right? Wrap each piece in foil separately? As I was only doing a test run for 1 serving, that's what I did. Next time when I make a larger amount, I will put them in a gratin dish covered with foil, then uncover briefly before taking out of the oven. (I don't like having my food right on foil.)

I've wrapped mine individually as instructed & they've turned out fine. Think its the individual steaming that's wanted.

Let us know how the other method turns out.

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Made the eggplant & garlic dish. Super. I used the Herbes de la Garrigue. It's so simple to make even my DILs will enjoy making it.

But did I read the directions right? Wrap each piece in foil separately? As I was only doing a test run for 1 serving, that's what I did. Next time when I make a larger amount, I will put them in a gratin dish covered with foil, then uncover briefly before taking out of the oven. (I don't like having my food right on foil.)

I've wrapped mine individually as instructed & they've turned out fine. Think its the individual steaming that's wanted.

Let us know how the other method turns out.

I think you're right. There was a bit of caramelization on one of the two pieces I made. That's why I thought I'd give it a shot of heat uncovered at the end if I make them in a gratin dish.

It'll be a while til I do this again as there are so many other dishes I want to try. I'm looking around for something different for T-day sides


"Half of cooking is thinking about cooking." ---Michael Roberts

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It'll be a while til I do this again as there are so many other dishes I want to try. I'm looking around for something different for T-day sides

Make "Michel Bras' Stuffed Onions". I made them last year for xmas and they were a big hit.


E. Nassar
Houston, TX

My Blog
contact: enassar(AT)gmail(DOT)com

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It'll be a while til I do this again as there are so many other dishes I want to try. I'm looking around for something different for T-day sides

Make "Michel Bras' Stuffed Onions". I made them last year for xmas and they were a big hit.

That's next on my list of "to trys." I love onions and have other onion dishes up my holiday sleeve typically. (A pissaladiere and Judy Rodgers' super pickled red onions.) If the Stuffed Onions turn out really well, I'll bump the onion tart. Sometimes I'll make sweet/sour cippolini for the holidays, but I like that better than my family does.


"Half of cooking is thinking about cooking." ---Michael Roberts

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It'll be a while til I do this again as there are so many other dishes I want to try. I'm looking around for something different for T-day sides

Make "Michel Bras' Stuffed Onions". I made them last year for xmas and they were a big hit.

That's next on my list of "to trys." I love onions and have other onion dishes up my holiday sleeve typically. (A pissaladiere and Judy Rodgers' super pickled red onions.) If the Stuffed Onions turn out really well, I'll bump the onion tart. Sometimes I'll make sweet/sour cippolini for the holidays, but I like that better than my family does.

Yeap, love onion dishes as well...I like it when people are surprised that onions are not just there to be used as a base, they can stand their own. For this Thanksgiving I am debating making those onions again or an Onion Gratin that looks great in Jamie Oliver's new book. That's a discussion for a different thread though.


E. Nassar
Houston, TX

My Blog
contact: enassar(AT)gmail(DOT)com

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I'm new to eGullet, but have been cooking from this book for about 6 months. Having just returned from a cooking school in the Perigord, I could cook and eat this kind of food everyday.

My question is about the "Chicken in a Pot" (page 144) which is served with steamed vegetables and green sauce (page 145)- a deeply satisfying meal.

My problem is with the green sauce, which breaks every time I make it. Has anyone else experienced the same problem? Anyone see anything in this simple sauce that could be the cause? Any ideas how to fix it once it's broken? TIA.

Bill/SFNM

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Made the eggplant & garlic dish. Super. I used the Herbes de la Garrigue. It's so simple to make even my DILs will enjoy making it.

But did I read the directions right? Wrap each piece in foil separately? As I was only doing a test run for 1 serving, that's what I did. Next time when I make a larger amount, I will put them in a gratin dish covered with foil, then uncover briefly before taking out of the oven. (I don't like having my food right on foil.)

I've wrapped mine individually as instructed & they've turned out fine. Think its the individual steaming that's wanted.

Let us know how the other method turns out.

I think you're right. There was a bit of caramelization on one of the two pieces I made. That's why I thought I'd give it a shot of heat uncovered at the end if I make them in a gratin dish.

It'll be a while til I do this again as there are so many other dishes I want to try. I'm looking around for something different for T-day sides

Not sure, but I'll look forward to hearing the results.

As you know although these eggplants taste great Its not the prettiest dish on the block. To help I sauteed some red bell peppers julienned lengthways. Sliced the eggplant lengthways into 6ths then sort of wove the two together over a bit of salad & sprinkled over the pan juices from the peppers. Looked a lot better & the flavours complimented well. Still wouldn't win any beauty contests, but c'est le vie.

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:laugh: Very inventive. The ugliness factor is a problem when you're thinking of using this for entertaining.

Another possibility would be to chop it up and use it to make tartines, garnishing with the peppers.


"Half of cooking is thinking about cooking." ---Michael Roberts

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:laugh: Very inventive. The ugliness factor is a problem when you're thinking of using this for entertaining.

Another possibility would be to chop it up and use it to make tartines, garnishing with the peppers.

Good thought!

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From the "necessity is the mother ..." department, I was making the Creme de Potiron (p. 67) this weekend and had run out of homemade chicken stock. I had a carton of store-bought stock to which I added some leftover duck confit gel (p. 201). I used one cup of confit juice to 3 cups of stock. I would say the results were even better than using homemade stock.

Bill/SFNM


Edited by Bill/SFNM (log)

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I made the "casserole of duck breasts with potatoes as prepared in the Bigorre" tonight. I think this is one of the easiest dishes in the book. I bought a large duckbreast today, not really knowing what I was going to do with it, browsed through the book and realized I had everything else for the recipe already in my fridge.

Despite this 'simplicity', it's a gem. Really really good. Potatoes browned in duckfat, now there's nothing wrong with that, but the juices of the duckbreast seeping into it while it finishes cooking on top of the potatocake, make it really special.

gallery_21505_2929_78216.jpg

I also made the celeriac/applepuree. Now I have a question about that. I cooked the celeriac and apple in milk as stated, but the acidity from the apple (I think) caused the milk to curdle and when I drained the pan there were lots of big and small curds. I picked out the largest ones (and ate them, very good actually, apply/celeriacy curds! :smile: ) but the small ones were still visible even after pureeing. It did not affect the taste but it looked a bit weird. Did I do anything wrong?

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Klary, that happened to me once recently when I used low fat milk, but I've cooked the celery root and apples in whole milk several times without any curdling. Your duck breast looks fantastic!

Bill, what a good idea. I'm always looking for a use for duck jelly. It wasn't too salty with a full cup? Mine is always sort of like demi-glace, really intense.

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last night we made the cabbage cake with sausage. it tastes really good (we aren't big cabbage fans but got some in our farmers box so wanted to use it) but it looked a mess. I think the sausages need to be cut thinner, it asked for them to be 1 1/3" thick. Also I'm sure I needed more fat in the pan.

But as I said it tasted really good and next time we get a cabbage we'll try it again!

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Absolutly picture perfect meals Klary and Wendy! These onions are truly a triumph.


E. Nassar
Houston, TX

My Blog
contact: enassar(AT)gmail(DOT)com

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I'm in the early days of cassoulet production. I have my confit made, my various pork products purchased and I'm exploring my bean options. So cassoulet question. I'm not sure if this is the right place to ask it, but since I suspect Paula follows this thread, here goes.

There is always mention when cassoulet is discussed about stirring in the crust up to 7 times. I somehow pictured this as turning over the entire casserole, however as I read the instructions on page 319 it reads 'Gently stir up the skin that has formed on the beans'. So does this mean that we simply 'disturb' the crust a few times, or does actual stirring happen?

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..... I'm exploring my bean options....

[hijack]

Kerry, When you sort out your bean situation, please post a note here [or in the Vancouver / Western Canada section] saying what, from where, and how it worked.

We brought a pound or so of Tarbais beans back to BC from a european summer vacation and intend to try planting them in the spring, but meanwhile, what to use? The conift's aging, the homemade sausage is waiting, the weather is definitely saying cassoulet....

[/hijack]

cheers

Derek

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I just lightly turn over the entire top layer, one spoonful at a time, only a spoon's width or so deep.

Thank you for clarifying this for me. This is how I shall do it. (when I get to that point - this really is a major project)

..... I'm exploring my bean options....

[hijack]

Kerry, When you sort out your bean situation, please post a note here [or in the Vancouver / Western Canada section] saying what, from where, and how it worked.

We brought a pound or so of Tarbais beans back to BC from a european summer vacation and intend to try planting them in the spring, but meanwhile, what to use? The conift's aging, the homemade sausage is waiting, the weather is definitely saying cassoulet....

[/hijack]

cheers

Derek

Now I have Tarbais envy. I've brought back any number of things from Europe over the years, but until now didn't realize I should have got Tarbais. I'll let you know what beans I decide on, but I don't have a basis of comparison, never having had cassoulet before.

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..... I'm exploring my bean options....

[hijack]

Kerry, When you sort out your bean situation, please post a note here [or in the Vancouver / Western Canada section] saying what, from where, and how it worked.

We brought a pound or so of Tarbais beans back to BC from a european summer vacation and intend to try planting them in the spring, but meanwhile, what to use? The conift's aging, the homemade sausage is waiting, the weather is definitely saying cassoulet....

[/hijack]

cheers

Derek

I recently made up a big batch of cassoulet from scratch using duck confit sous vide and Toulouse Sausage from Paula's book (although not her recipe for cassoultet). I used French Tarbais beans for the first time and couldn't detect any benefit over less expensive and more available white beans.

Bill/SFNM

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..... I'm exploring my bean options....

[hijack]

Kerry, When you sort out your bean situation, please post a note here [or in the Vancouver / Western Canada section] saying what, from where, and how it worked.

We brought a pound or so of Tarbais beans back to BC from a european summer vacation and intend to try planting them in the spring, but meanwhile, what to use? The conift's aging, the homemade sausage is waiting, the weather is definitely saying cassoulet....

[/hijack]

cheers

Derek

I recently made up a big batch of cassoulet from scratch using duck confit sous vide and Toulouse Sausage from Paula's book (although not her recipe for cassoultet). I used French Tarbais beans for the first time and couldn't detect any benefit over less expensive and more available white beans.

Bill/SFNM

So what white beans would you use if you didn't have access to the Tarbais?

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