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Candy and Cookie Packaging


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Check out Glerup-Revere www.glerup.com

They are in Seattle, have a good selection, especially for bonbon packaging, and IIR, were pretty nice about offering 'samples' of 10 or so. I'm planning to stop in on my next visit to Seattle and stock up on packaging and ribbon before Christmas.

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I really like the Glenrup-Revere stuff too. Also in Canada www.chocolat-chocolat.com has nice boxes. (not inexpensive)

There is also Creations Mercedes. I'll have to see if I can find her website later today.

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Wow, Glenrup-Revere has a lot of nice stuff. Kerry, have you bought from them? Was there any hassle shipping to Canada?

I have, they were very accommodating and I didn't have any trouble with shipping. Took a while, but then it often does.

The link for Creations Mercedes in Montreal.

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I am gettingthe champagne molds soon and I will want to use foil or whatever packing to make it look like a champagne bottle.  Which company carries the proper foil that I would use for the top of the bottle?

Chocolat-chocolat has foil, as does Andea in Ancaster Ontario.

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  • 7 months later...

I have recently started a new baking business (www.ruthssweetpleasures.com, if interested), and am having fits trying to package my macarons well. I purchased cello bags and gold twist ties, but I can't get a really beautiful result -- the macaron filling tends to smear on the inside of the bag on its way into the bag, and the macarons don't tend to stay nicely stacked in the bag.

I'm thinking I should go to a clear box, but am concerned about a) expense and b) airtight-ness. I haven't found a slam-dunk product at any of my usual purveyors -- any recommendations would be most appreciated!

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I'd say that if you want to stick with the bag, you need one which is a snug fit so as to reduce movement. If you're packaging before sale (ie, so it doesn't need to be done quickly on the spot), bag them while chilled. You might also consider a clear sheet of plastic to line the bag, so that the movement of the bag itself is less likely to cause smear and jiggling.

Some retailers in Paris lay the macarons flat in a cello bag on its side, rather than stacking them.

A cardboard box with clear lid would be the most customer-friendly packaging in many contexts.

Good luck!

-- lamington a.k.a. Duncan Markham

The Gastronomer's Bookshelf - collaborative book reviews about all things food and wine

Syrup & Tang - candid commentary and flavourful fancies

"It's healthy. It's cake. It's chocolate cake."

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I have recently started a new baking business (www.ruthssweetpleasures.com, if interested), and am having fits trying to package my macarons well.  I purchased cello bags and gold twist ties, but I can't get a really beautiful result -- the macaron filling tends to smear on the inside of the bag on its way into the bag, and the macarons don't tend to stay nicely stacked in the bag.

I'm thinking I should go to a clear box, but am concerned about a) expense and b) airtight-ness.  I haven't found a slam-dunk product at any of my usual purveyors -- any recommendations would be most appreciated!

Here are some ideas, Ruth:

Mad Baker's Macaron Set on Flickr has lots of good ideas. Be sure to view both pages.

Another on Design is Mine blog.

And another at Bliss Wedding Market.

And finally, the Laduree macaron boxes.

These are from a google images search for 'macaron.'

edited to add: It just occurred to me that you could perhaps use a clear acetate collar to wrap around your macarons to keep them in line and nicely stacked. Then slide that whole assembly into your bag. Voila!

Edited by John DePaula (log)

John DePaula
formerly of DePaula Confections
Hand-crafted artisanal chocolates & gourmet confections - …Because Pleasure Matters…
--------------------
When asked “What are the secrets of good cooking? Escoffier replied, “There are three: butter, butter and butter.”

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I have recently started a new baking business (www.ruthssweetpleasures.com, if interested), and am having fits trying to package my macarons well.  I purchased cello bags and gold twist ties, but I can't get a really beautiful result -- the macaron filling tends to smear on the inside of the bag on its way into the bag, and the macarons don't tend to stay nicely stacked in the bag.

I'm thinking I should go to a clear box, but am concerned about a) expense and b) airtight-ness.  I haven't found a slam-dunk product at any of my usual purveyors -- any recommendations would be most appreciated!

Here are some ideas, Ruth:

Mad Baker's Macaron Set on Flickr has lots of good ideas. Be sure to view both pages.

Another on Design is Mine blog.

And another at Bliss Wedding Market.

And finally, the Laduree macaron boxes.

These are from a google images search for 'macaron.'

edited to add: It just occurred to me that you could perhaps use a clear acetate collar to wrap around your macarons to keep them in line and nicely stacked. Then slide that whole assembly into your bag. Voila!

Thank you so much for the ideas, John! I will clicky away with great optimism.

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I have recently started a new baking business (www.ruthssweetpleasures.com, if interested), and am having fits trying to package my macarons well.  I purchased cello bags and gold twist ties, but I can't get a really beautiful result -- the macaron filling tends to smear on the inside of the bag on its way into the bag, and the macarons don't tend to stay nicely stacked in the bag.

I'm thinking I should go to a clear box, but am concerned about a) expense and b) airtight-ness.  I haven't found a slam-dunk product at any of my usual purveyors -- any recommendations would be most appreciated!

Thanks, Duncan -- I like the idea of a cardboard box with a clear lid.

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one thing about cardboard is that it can transfer (flavor-wise) into your product. even food-grade stuff still smells of cardboard. i'd look at just clear plastic boxes. they aren't that expensive and you can factor that into your price.

edited to add: of course, lined cardboard might be another thing entirely. and you can always add some glassine paper liner to your boxes as well. or candy pads or something.

Edited by alanamoana (log)
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