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eG Foodblog: torakris/snowangel - When Pocky meets pad thai....


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No to brussel's sprouts.  I never eat brussels sprouts that are picked before a hard frost.  My grandmother (a wise and wonderful goddess said never to eat them before a hard frost, and they are even better eaten when one has to "wade" out to the garden in snow boots, snow falling into said boots, when one picks them).

That's interesting. The perfect Northern MN crop!

Next year's garden, nothing but root vegtables and brussels sprouts!

SB (tired of Jack Frost raiding his garden):shock:

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Just finished breakfast... an apple

it is sort of weird that we both start our morning with coffee and apples.. :hmmm:

I am now off to a couple stores to buy things for the weekend events and tonight HSSS dinner.

Kristin Wagner, aka "torakris"

 

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SB (tired of Jack Frost raiding his garden):shock:

FOr me, it was too much rain and too many rabbits. I was pleading, at a certain point this summer, for all of my neighbors to let their indoor cats become outdoor hunters.

Susan Fahning aka "snowangel"
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We have dinner. Heidi has had a bath. Peter has done is homework and some prep for lunch tomorrow. Diana is doing her homework. I've abandoned the basement for today.

So, for dinner, we had

gallery_6263_35_48654.jpg

Mac and Cheese with Crumb Topping, Green Beans (Southern Style), and one of my last ripe Brandywines.

It was really yummy. Normally, when I make mac and cheese, it is the egg/evaporated milk quickie version. THe kids said "baked mac and cheese?" I was skeptical. But, one taste of the mac and cheese with that crumb topping, and they said "make it again." BTW -- I doubled the amount of crumb topping. crunch and smooth is a good combination. Peter thought the green beans tasted like bacon :wub::wub::wub: (he's been trained well). I didn't follow fifi's advice in that I didn't drain any of the bacon fat off. Bacon fat is a good thing. The brandywine was wonderful. I'll probably have my obligatory apple for breakfast in the morning with a side of green beans. Heidi will have mac and cheese for breakfast (at school; breakfast is in the special ed class which does have a full kitchen, including a microwave). Peter wants mac and cheese for his after school snack. But, no one is getting the green beans but me.

So, after we got things from dinner cleaned up, I mentioned to Peter that I would have lunch with him tomorrow. Normally, he takes school lunch , but he has a hankering for tuna salad, which is is now making himself. So, he did it. He has mastered the Ekco can opener which I got as a wedding present

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Then, scrape everything carefully out of the can with a fork, rinse the lid and toss, and then add mayo and pickle relish (no comments, please; he can do this himself and is very proud).

So, tomorrow morning, we will make him a couple of sandwiches and have lunch with him at school. He wants me to make the sandwiches so his squishy white breat doesn't get any quishier, add a bag of chips and a couple of apples. We will get milk at school.

Susan Fahning aka "snowangel"
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Dreary day #4 and we have rain forecast everday through next Weds!!

Even in rainy season (June) it doesn't rain this much. :angry:

Our BBQ on Sunday is probably going to be meat grilled on a hotplate party....

I was talking to my friend about what we should make and she said her husband requested that I make my guacamole and roasted chickpeas. So I will be making a chips plate wih guacamole and maybe two salsas, the roasted chickpeas- which I hestitate to call mine as it is actually a recipe from Jack Bishop's Vegetarian Italian book. I told her I would do some kind of dessert and another vegetable dish.

I am halfway through my iced coffee..

Well, I'm happy to report that the weather has taken a decidedly nice turn since this morning (at least here in Tokyo). The weather channel is claiming 23 but stepping outside I'd swear it's hotter. Unfortunately, it was also showing a possibility of clouds and rain for tomorrow so may need to use the shichirin instead of the coleman in case we have to suddenly move the grill out of the rain!

Our current plan for tomorrow's bbq calls for karubi, scallops, some of those big costco dogs and home made corn bread.

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I am just catching up after a Roadrunner outage and I am really intrigued with this blog. You guys are doing a great job of going back and forth with your home happenings and the food looks so realistic and interestng. Susan, I am particularly intrigued with your using the ss mushroom to smash fresh ginger. :wink: I never thought of that. I often get really fresh ginger at my local Hong Kong Market. It does seem to lend itself to smashing. I would just slice it thinly across the fiber and after smashing, it should be good to go.

Yes, you can plant the fresh (and not so fresh) ginger root and get it going. If you have been able to keep a Kaffir lime tree, you should be able to do it with ginger. I am going to try galangal when I get in the house.

Linda LaRose aka "fifi"

"Having spent most of my life searching for truth in the excitement of science, I am now in search of the perfectly seared foie gras without any sweet glop." Linda LaRose

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So, after we got things from dinner cleaned up, I mentioned to Peter that I would have lunch with him tomorrow.  Normally, he takes school lunch , but he has a hankering for tuna salad, which is is now making himself.  So, he did it.  He has mastered the Ekco can opener which I got as a wedding present

gallery_6263_35_31351.jpg

Then, scrape everything carefully out of the can with a fork, rinse the lid and toss, and then add mayo and pickle relish (no comments, please; he can do this himself and is very proud).

So, tomorrow morning, we will make him a couple of sandwiches and have lunch with him at school.  He wants me to make the sandwiches so his squishy white breat doesn't get any quishier, add a bag of chips and a couple of apples.  We will get milk at school.

Peter's growing into such a cutie! He's going to be a heartbreaker.

"No comments, please," you said...but I have one anyway, and a question. First: I remember that I used to love squishy white bread. I'd mash it down until the texture of the baloney/bologna/whatever that processed meat is called could almost be seen through the bread itself. To me, that was heaven.

Second, the question: what kind of pickle relish does Peter like in his tuna salad? Me, I'm a dill pickle relish fan.

Nancy Smith, aka "Smithy"
HosteG Forumsnsmith@egstaff.org

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"Every day should be filled with something delicious, because life is too short not to spoil yourself. " -- Ling (with permission)
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Reviewing this, I realized I meant to post a pick of Peter finishing his tuna salad

gallery_6263_35_13068.jpg

We only buy Gedney relish. And, if I had my way, very store I shop at would carry Gedney Sauerkraut. Their kraut is of the sour vareity, and very crunchy. The latter product is not readily available. Another Gedney favoriate of mine is

gallery_6263_35_378991.jpg

Little, crunchy, and nice and spicy (especially when the jar is empty enough that you have to dig the pickles out with a fork instead of clean fingers).

Susan Fahning aka "snowangel"
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I often get really fresh ginger at my local Hong Kong Market. It does seem to lend itself to smashing. I would just slice it thinly across the fiber and after smashing, it should be good to go.

Yes, you can plant the fresh (and not so fresh) ginger root and get it going. If you have been able to keep a Kaffir lime tree, you should be able to do it with ginger. I am going to try galangal when I get in the house.

Linda, be proud of your green bean recipe. Really. Everyone in the household gave it high honors.

And, this ginger was so young and tender it did not need to be sliced before smashed. I'd give m eye teeth to have a field of this available on any given day. This ginger I bought was a true cooking revelation to me. The kind of revelation that only occurs once a decade.

Susan Fahning aka "snowangel"
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Susan, that dinner looks great! My kids would have loved that.

I spent the morning running around picking up loads of food in prep for the weekend, made it back in time to pick up Hide at 11:30 and then back out for some more shopping. For lunch Hide and stopped at Wendy's, unfortunately it never occured to be to bring my camera....

I had their new sesame chicken sandwich, Hide had a hamburger and we shared fires and a Pepsi. The sandwich was good, I won't be running back again in the near future, but I would order it again.

Now I need to get ready for that party that will be starting in about 30 minutes...

Kristin Wagner, aka "torakris"

 

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Dreary day #4 and we have rain forecast everday through next Weds!!

Even in rainy season (June) it doesn't rain this much. :angry:

Our BBQ on Sunday is probably going to be meat grilled on a hotplate party....

I was talking to my friend about what we should make and she said her husband requested that I make my guacamole and roasted chickpeas. So I will be making a chips plate wih guacamole and maybe two salsas, the roasted chickpeas- which I hestitate to call mine as it is actually a recipe from Jack Bishop's Vegetarian Italian book. I told her I would do some kind of dessert and another vegetable dish.

I am halfway through my iced coffee..

Well, I'm happy to report that the weather has taken a decidedly nice turn since this morning (at least here in Tokyo). The weather channel is claiming 23 but stepping outside I'd swear it's hotter. Unfortunately, it was also showing a possibility of clouds and rain for tomorrow so may need to use the shichirin instead of the coleman in case we have to suddenly move the grill out of the rain!

Our current plan for tomorrow's bbq calls for karubi, scallops, some of those big costco dogs and home made corn bread.

Bruce, welcome to eGullet!! and what a great place for your first post. :biggrin:

It did clear up quite nicely this morning didn't it?It was definitely warmer than 23. Unfortunately now (1:00pm) is is really starting to cloud over, I am going to have to pull my laundry inside soon.

I really hope it doesn't rain tomorrow.....

A look at the weather channel, now has rain today and tomorrow but cloudy through Weds. A couple hours ago they had rain through Weds. I really hate this Tokyo weather....

Kristin Wagner, aka "torakris"

 

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I'm handing it over, Kris.

The kids are all in bed, and all asleep. Homework done, backpacks packed for tomorrow. My lists and the note to take my camera are duct taped to the steering wheel of my vehicle for tmorrow.

Trust me, it gets easier when they are all in school all day long every day of the week, but I still have lunch once a week (as I will tomrrow) witth one of them each and every week.

When you bring the kids back to the States every summer, what do they think?

Good night, all! Over and out, Kris.

Susan Fahning aka "snowangel"
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We only buy Gedney relish.    And, if I had my way, very store I shop at would carry Gedney Sauerkraut.  Their kraut is of the sour vareity, and very crunchy.  The latter product is not readily available.  Another Gedney favoriate of mine is

I've only had Gedney's peach raspberry (raspberry peach?) jam...a gift from a friend (whose picture is on the jar--she does the cherry one, too). Next time I'm in MSP, I'll have to try relish and sauerkraut, too!

I also have a picture of myself wearing a Gedney's pickle hat. :biggrin: Gotta love Gedney's!

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A very loud party of about 14 kids (currently) is going on., I was planning to make chocolate chip cookies but the kids brought along so many snackks there is no need for them. Everyone is currently snacking on chips, cheetos, marshmallows (sp?), various cookies and drinking orange juice and calpis.

Time to get to work on dinner.

Anyone have any favorites from Hot Sour Salty Sweet?

oh and I just remembered I was asked if I will be doing a cooking class during this blog, because of the number of events and half days of school this week I don't have one scheduled... sorry

Kristin Wagner, aka "torakris"

 

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A very loud party of about 14 kids (currently) is going on., I was planning to make chocolate chip cookies but the kids brought along so many snackks there is no need for them. Everyone is currently snacking on chips, cheetos, marshmallows (sp?), various cookies and drinking orange juice and calpis.

Narrowing in...do you find that Japanese-made cheetos taste a bit...weird? They remind me of creamed corn (the canned kind).

And speaking of snacks, do you children like root beer, at all? I've noticed that most Japanese people don't like root beer. Not necessarily a bad thing, as that leaves more for me, but it makes it a bit harder to find!

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A very loud party of about 14 kids (currently) is going on., I was planning to make chocolate chip cookies but the kids brought along so many snackks there is no need for them. Everyone is currently snacking on chips, cheetos, marshmallows (sp?), various cookies and drinking orange juice and calpis.

Narrowing in...do you find that Japanese-made cheetos taste a bit...weird? They remind me of creamed corn (the canned kind).

And speaking of snacks, do you children like root beer, at all? I've noticed that most Japanese people don't like root beer. Not necessarily a bad thing, as that leaves more for me, but it makes it a bit harder to find!

I don't like the Japanese made cheese-y puff snacks, yeah they do taste something like corn.... I buy the cheetos from Costco and they taste just like I remember. :biggrin:

My kids like rootbeer, they drink it in the US (my father loves it) but I have never bought it here. About a year ago they were passing out samples of it at Costco and the reactions were hysterical. I don't think I saw anyone finish it and many people were making the comment that it tasted like medicine.

Kristin Wagner, aka "torakris"

 

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I don't like the Japanese made cheese-y puff snacks, yeah they do taste something like corn.... I buy the cheetos from Costco and they taste just like I remember. :biggrin:

They have cheetos at Costco? I don't remember seeing them at my Costco! Maybe I'll have to check it out again. Haven't been there in a little while, and I think I need more grapes. It seems, though, that our Costco stores carry some different products. They still don't carry Thai rice at my Costco. And I'm almost out of the bag I bought in Thailand last year! (I don't eat a lot of rice, anymore, so a 5kg bag lasts me a loooooooong time!)

My kids like rootbeer, they drink it in the US (my father loves it) but I have never bought it here. About a year ago they were passing out samples of it at Costco and the reactions were hysterical. I don't think I saw anyone finish it and many people were making the comment that it tasted like medicine.

I can just imagine the looks on people's faces! Actually, aside from Filipinos, I haven't met very many Asian-born people who like root beer. Except my dad, but he's was an exception in many ways. :smile:

A case of root beer from Costco lasts me almost as long as a 5kg bag of rice, which is a good thing, I think. It's so much cheaper there, too! A case is equal to about 8 cans in an import store.

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I don't like the Japanese made cheese-y puff snacks, yeah they do taste something like corn.... I buy the cheetos from Costco and they taste just like I remember. :biggrin:

They have cheetos at Costco? I don't remember seeing them at my Costco! Maybe I'll have to check it out again. Haven't been there in a little while, and I think I need more grapes. It seems, though, that our Costco stores carry some different products. They still don't carry Thai rice at my Costco. And I'm almost out of the bag I bought in Thailand last year! (I don't eat a lot of rice, anymore, so a 5kg bag lasts me a loooooooong time!)

They sell it with 5 smallish bags inside one large one, it is quite cheap too.

I haven't seen that jasmine rice at Costco for over a year now, I bought it a couple months ago at Carrefour. I am almost out again though....

Kristin Wagner, aka "torakris"

 

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I had a couple of problems with dinner tonight...

I broke the most important rule of not reading the entire recipe through before starting. :hmmm:

I picked 3 recipes from Hot Sour Salty Sweet that I had never made before:

Silky Coconut Pumpkin Soup pg 51

Som Tam with Yard Long Beans pg 76

Laab gai pg 196 (I have made laab many times before but always with a David Thompson recipe)

The soup went together quite easily but I had the impression from the title that it was a pureed soup and it wasn't...

This was really good though and I will definitely make it again.

gallery_6134_1857_9791.jpg

The beans were raw. I read the recipe about 20 times trying to find out why I was missing the step where they boiled or at least blanched the beans and it turns out there isn't one. The paste ingredients (garlic, dried shrimp, peanuts, chile, etc ) are ground in a mortar and pestle then lime juice, nampla and tomatoes are added along with some of the raw beans and pounded. Raw beans don't pound real easily and there was a lot of liquid. I actually considered taking a shower when I finished... :hmmm:

My husband really loved it, I like the flavor but after a couple bites the raw taste of the beans was starting to bother me. It was a really good match with the jasmine rice though.

Is it supposed to be so watery?

gallery_6134_1857_19763.jpg

My third dish the laab was wonderful, how can laab be anything but? :biggrin: I found this really nice red stemmed spinach at teh store and decided to use it as a base.

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I chopped the chicken thighs in the food processor and then it is supposed to be simmered for a very short time. I thought I turned off the burner before I went outside to talk to my neighbors but apparently not. :shock: They must have simmered for a good 20 minutes...

It did turn out fine though.

I set out some lettuce for scooping

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I wasn't sure how much of this the kids would enjoy so I deep fried some frozen shumai.

gallery_6134_1857_22742.jpg

It was a really good meal, but of course it is an excellent book!

It was all enjoyed with jasmine rice.

Kristin Wagner, aka "torakris"

 

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This looks absolutely wonderful! I have never had laab, although I see a few mentions from people who are enthralled by it. Could you talk a bit more about it if you have a chance?

And yes, add my compliments to the many about your beautiful girls and their incredible ballet dresses (what a teacher!).

Edited by Corinna Dunne (log)
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This looks absolutely wonderful!  I have never had laab, although I see a few mentions from people who are enthralled by it.  Could you talk a bit more about it if you have a chance?

And yes, add my compliments to the many about your beautiful girls and their incredible ballet dresses (what a teacher!).

If you have some time you might want to check out the laab thread, all 20 pages!

I still consider myself a laab newbie, I am sure Susan, a laab expert, can give us a lot more information. :biggrin:

Laab is really incredibly easy and the taste is just out of this world. If laab is on the table there is no need for anything else...

Kristin Wagner, aka "torakris"

 

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Good morning, all! What a pleasure to wake to the talk of larb!

And, the sun is shining this morning. Finally.

This is where I usually have at least one cup of coffee every morning.

gallery_6263_35_42692.jpg

But, it is only 30 degrees (F) outside, so I need to get on some warmer clothes and find some socks!

Susan Fahning aka "snowangel"
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The beans were raw. I read the recipe about 20 times trying to find out why I was missing the step where they boiled or at least blanched the beans and it turns out there isn't one. The paste ingredients (garlic, dried shrimp, peanuts, chile, etc ) are ground in a mortar and pestle then lime juice, nampla and tomatoes are added along with some of the raw beans and pounded. Raw beans don't pound real easily and there was a lot of liquid. I actually considered taking a shower when I finished... :hmmm:

My husband really loved it, I like the flavor but after a couple bites the raw taste of the beans was starting to bother me. It was a really good match with the jasmine rice though.

Is it supposed to be so watery?

I don't know if it is supposed to be so watery; maybe someone (Chris?) who has made it can chime in!

As for the raw texture, there is a little note in writing so small I had to get out my reading glasses that if the beans are tough, parboil them.

Susan Fahning aka "snowangel"
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