Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

Cooking shows not on Food Network


ghost
 Share

Recommended Posts

There's always that fat stupid bastard from FitTV who has supposedly "lost weight" using the "low carb" system. I get so angry watching his show; he'll be like "Okay, now we just add the heavy cream, the bacon, the butter, and the lard, and we have a really delicious and HEALTHY dessert!" He's so disillusioned...it's sickening.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

There's a show about two brothers (Rubino brothers, I think) filmed in Toronto. The show is called "Made to Order" or something on those lines. I can rarely watch because of my schedule, but it's a great show.

I watch it on Discovery Travel and Living (I'm in Chile) but I think it originally airs on the Food Network in Canada

Follow me @chefcgarcia

Fábula, my restaurant in Santiago, Chile

My Blog, en Español

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 1 year later...
Food Network Canada has/recently had some interesting cooking shows, none of which are shown on Food Net in the US, AFAIK. A few that I've seen:

Licence to Grill: A quantum jump beyond  BBQ-U (on PBS in the States). Each show features a variety of grilled dishes with much more interesting ingredients and techniques than BBQ-U. BBQ-U would have you believe that beer-can chicken is a major revelation; License to Grill focuses on much more interesting marinades from scratch (jerk sauce, Asian-inspired sauces) and more grilled veg dishes than generally seen elsewhere. BBQ-America (also on PBS) was better than BBQ-U; License to Grill is better than both.

Cook Like a Chef: Each show features a Canadian chef demonstrating a variety of dishes made from a particular ingredient or technique - potatoes, or beef, or greens (or deep-frying as a technique for several dishes).

Chef at Home: I'm somewhat ambivalent on this one. This show beats you over the head with the idea of cooking without a recipe - take some ingredients, seasonings, and wing it. An excellent idea, but probably too much for a beginner, yet not very interesting if you can already wing it.  The (male) host probably has considerable eye-candy appeal, but I'm not really qualified to judge that.

I am. He doesn't. And to top it all off, for some reason, the format of Chef at Home annoys me.

ETA: Unless you meant Take Home Chef with Curtis Stone (Aussie): in that case, yes, he definitely has eye-candy appeal. And I'm still quallified to judge that.

Edited by tino27 (log)

Flickr: Link

Instagram: Link

Twitter: Link

Link to comment
Share on other sites

--Caprial and John's kitchen, which is on PBS too. I think it's local, I'm not sure though. --

They filmed all those shows in Portland at their restaurant/cooking school...that show gets a little awkward to watch, they're not the best pair on camera.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...
"Colameco's Food Show" which is now in its fifth season on PBS. If there is any show on TV that captures the essence of an eGulleteer, it would be that one.

http://www.colameco.com

Of all the shows on cooking that I watch faithfully, Colameco's is by far THE best. The guy has the experience, personality and knowledge to make this a very entertaining and informative program. I'd feel very comfortable hanging out in his kitchen here in Jersey.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Anybody watching Todd English's show on PBS? It's airing here in Dallas now.

He goes to visit some city to learn about some sort of food item or food culture, then goes back to Olives in Boston and uses what he learned as inspiration to cook something.

Jeff Meeker, aka "jsmeeker"

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Ive watched some of todd english's shows...hes weird. He looks like an extremely stoned morrissey. I enjoy the show though, because he goes all over the place and tries a ton of food. I especially loved the dumpling episode

BEARS, BEETS, BATTLESTAR GALACTICA
Link to comment
Share on other sites

"Great Chefs of the World" it airs on Discover or TLC and is one of the best ones out there. It is also  on OnDemand in the mass. area.

Wonderful show! There was a series of "great chefs..." shows, and they were all excellent. Definitely not for beginners, though. there was little instruction, the episodes were tightly edited shows of working chefs preparing some of their signature dishes. they all assumed the viewer understood at least basic techniques. I liked the "great chefs of the west" for its insight on s.w. cuisine, of which I otherwise know nothing, and the "great chefs of the world" which often had someone doing voice-over translations. I haven't seen them on TV for a while, unfortunately.


Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 3 years later...

KCET in Los Angeles has been showing some cooking shows on Sunday (rather than Saturday). I just checked out their schedule online and have discovered they have cooking shows most of the weekday all this week, which is odd (due to a pledge drive, maybe?). Shows by Eric Ripert, Jacques Pepin, Lidia, Ming Tsai, Tommy Tang, Rick Bayless, Steve Raichlen and so on.

They have "Paul Prudhomme's Always Cooking!" in rotation with "Taste of Louisiana with Chef John Folse & Co.: Our Food Heritage". I haven't seen John Folse's show but did catch Chef Prudhomme's show yesterday. I was amazed at how much I learned. What the show lacks in pizazz is made up by the nuggets of cooking wisdom he tosses out as he cooks. Has anyone else seen Paul Prudhomme's show?

 

“Peter: Oh my god, Brian, there's a message in my Alphabits. It says, 'Oooooo.'

Brian: Peter, those are Cheerios.”

– From Fox TV’s “Family Guy”

 

Tim Oliver

Link to comment
Share on other sites

>>> Has anyone else seen Paul Prudhomme's show?

No!

And I wish my satellite company carried it. I'd be all over that. I'll have to turn to the dark side of the internet to find it.

I'm surprised nobody has mentioned Hubert Keller. If you can get past all the times he uses the words "nice" and "really," there's some good info there.

My school is calling for volunteers to work the taping of the new season here in Vegas. But I've got way too much on my plate here at the brewery. A shame, because a lot of my favorite cooks hail from Alsace. I'll bet I could learn a bunch.

Who cares how time advances? I am drinking ale today. -- Edgar Allan Poe

Link to comment
Share on other sites

KCET in Los Angeles has been showing some cooking shows on Sunday (rather than Saturday). I just checked out their schedule online and have discovered they have cooking shows most of the weekday all this week, which is odd (due to a pledge drive, maybe?). Shows by Eric Ripert, Jacques Pepin, Lidia, Ming Tsai, Tommy Tang, Rick Bayless, Steve Raichlen and so on.

They have "Paul Prudhomme's Always Cooking!" in rotation with "Taste of Louisiana with Chef John Folse & Co.: Our Food Heritage". I haven't seen John Folse's show but did catch Chef Prudhomme's show yesterday. I was amazed at how much I learned. What the show lacks in pizazz is made up by the nuggets of cooking wisdom he tosses out as he cooks. Has anyone else seen Paul Prudhomme's show?

KCET split, as of 1/1/11, from PBS, and is now programming independently. Whether or not that's a good thing remains to be seen...... :hmmm:

I have seen Chef Prudhomme's show on another SoCal PBS station, and LOVED it. LOVE him. LOVED it. As you said, just a wealth of information, most of it just as toss-away asides. Haven't seen Folse, either, though I keep trying to. Have loved Ripert, which has not been aired here before. Lidia, Tommy Tang, Ming, Bayless and Raichlen are all regulars in our rotation, but welcomed back (well, other than Raichlen, at least by me).

Some of the other offerings on KCET's new daytime cooking block, are, well.....odd....to say the least. There are some Japanese-produced shows that make the original "Iron Chef" look like Hemingway wrote them....

--Roberta--

"Let's slip out of these wet clothes, and into a dry Martini" - Robert Benchley

Pierogi's eG Foodblog

My *outside* blog, "A Pound Of Yeast"

Link to comment
Share on other sites

KCET split, as of 1/1/11, from PBS, and is now programming independently. Whether or not that's a good thing remains to be seen...... :hmmm:

...

Some of the other offerings on KCET's new daytime cooking block, are, well.....odd....to say the least. There are some Japanese-produced shows that make the original "Iron Chef" look like Hemingway wrote them....

Thanks for the info. It explains a lot. I really didn't notice that they dropped the PBS affiliation since they still seemed to be airing PBS-like content (oodles of cooking shows). It will be interesting to see how they will fare. Fortunately they're in Los Angeles. If they can't make it there they can't make it anywhere. Now I wonder if they will be having pledge months, too, since they're still commercial-free. Lidia 5 days a week? Sign me up. :biggrin:

I keep catching a Japanese "diary"-type show where they showcase a western woman (of italian descent?) living in Japan and her next door neighbor, a japanese artist who also restores japanese screens with painted murals on them. It's slow paced and oddly interesting.

I did catch the John Folse show which was far too talky. The current series seems to be delving into the history of cajun people, arcadians, etc, of Louisiana, and has a studio audience. Too much gabbing, not enough cooking. :hmmm:

I wonder if they got a deal on japanese-themed programming since they seem to show so much of it.

 

“Peter: Oh my god, Brian, there's a message in my Alphabits. It says, 'Oooooo.'

Brian: Peter, those are Cheerios.”

– From Fox TV’s “Family Guy”

 

Tim Oliver

Link to comment
Share on other sites

One of my favorites is A Taste of History with Walter Staib. The show features a crusty old German guy from Philly cooking recipes from colonial and revolutionary times. He uses an open fire to cook on, it's wild to watch. And he uses lard, "schmaltz", and weird ingredients like tripe and sweetbreads. Rock it out Walter.

  • Like 1


I have simple tastes. I am always satisfied with the best - Oscar Wilde

The Easy Bohemian

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 years later...

"Great Chefs of the World" it airs on Discover or TLC and is one of the best ones out there. It is also on OnDemand in the mass. area.

Wonderful show! There was a series of "great chefs..." shows, and they were all excellent. Definitely not for beginners, though. there was little instruction, the episodes were tightly edited shows of working chefs preparing some of their signature dishes. they all assumed the viewer understood at least basic techniques. I liked the "great chefs of the west" for its insight on s.w. cuisine, of which I otherwise know nothing, and the "great chefs of the world" which often had someone doing voice-over translations. I haven't seen them on TV for a while, unfortunately.

Check out their web site. Now all the programs are available, over 500, on CD. I just ordered the French serious.

The Philip Mahl Community teaching kitchen is now open. Check it out. "Philip Mahl Memorial Kitchen" on Facebook. Website coming soon.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

"Great Chefs of the World" it airs on Discover or TLC and is one of the best ones out there. It is also on OnDemand in the mass. area.

Wonderful show! There was a series of "great chefs..." shows, and they were all excellent. Definitely not for beginners, though. there was little instruction, the episodes were tightly edited shows of working chefs preparing some of their signature dishes. they all assumed the viewer understood at least basic techniques. I liked the "great chefs of the west" for its insight on s.w. cuisine, of which I otherwise know nothing, and the "great chefs of the world" which often had someone doing voice-over translations. I haven't seen them on TV for a while, unfortunately.

Check out their web site. Now all the programs are available, over 500, on CD. I just ordered the French serious.

thanks for the update, I used to love this series when it was broadcast on tv. They packed a lot into each show and really showcased the effort that goes into great food. That it was never dumbed-down was one of the attractions and probably one of the things that kept it from being on the Food Network.


Link to comment
Share on other sites

I capped a huge number of the 'Great Chef' series and was able to digitalize many of them from old VHS tapes. they also have a

number of books that go with the series. Ill have to ask my local library system to see if they might get some of the DVD's

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 years later...

One of my favorites is A Taste of History with Walter Staib. The show features a crusty old German guy from Philly cooking recipes from colonial and revolutionary times. He uses an open fire to cook on, it's wild to watch. And he uses lard, "schmaltz", and weird ingredients like tripe and sweetbreads. Rock it out Walter.

 

 

Love Chef Staib. Authentic all the way... He was cooking bread in South Africa the other night...

Wawa Sizzli FTW!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 1 month later...

just watching Chef Staib's visit home to the Black Forest in Germany.   The maultashen is so like the way I was taught though the kataffel  salat wasn't like Grandma Rose made hers.  It is similar to one that I had copied out from a book several years ago and John really liked it.   Black Forest cake .... not so much

Nothing is better than frying in lard.

Nothing.  Do not quote me on this.

 

Linda Ellerbee

Take Big Bites

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 Share

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.
×
×
  • Create New...