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Serious Foodie Class in Vancouver


Daddy-A
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Re last week's pizza.....is it verbotten to share the recipe for the dough and the tomato sauce?  If not, please post them...

For everyone out there like me who wanted to go this time, but didn't....anyone want to attend the next class?  I believe it starts January 23rd and costs $695.

Lee, I wouldn't want to step on Chef Tony's toes, so I'll e-mail you the recipe. Besides, you'll be learning it yourself come January, no?! :wink:

And be sure to take that January instalment of the Serious Foodie Class so that you can join me in April for the Advanced Serious Foodie series! :biggrin:

Joie Alvaro Kent

"I like rice. Rice is great if you're hungry and want 2,000 of something." ~ Mitch Hedberg

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^ Hi Ling!

Yes Rustichella is a brand of pasta and they make different kinds. You can find them at Gourmet Warehouse and other fine vendors. You will notice that they are different from other pastas because the pasta is "rough" in texture. Imagine sauce sticking to the rough surface...oh man. It's like hundreds if little spoons attached to the pasta!

They manage this (according to chef Tony) by feeding the pasta through a stone die instead of the standard nylon used in most pasta makers (nylon is FAST but makes for a smooth pasta like you see in primo or catelli). The stone one is much slower. I believe he also said the pasta is dried outside in the sun versus with fans.

That being said it is of course much more expensive...but Chef Tony's comment? "Pasta is CHEAP to start with, even if you have MUCH more expensive pasta it is STILL cheap!"

:biggrin:

"There are two things every chef needs in the kitchen: fish sauce and duck fat" - Tony Minichiello

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Daddy-A works his like a pro.  Look at the length!!

PICT0014.sized.jpg

:shock: I just may use that as my new sig line! :laugh::laugh:

Easily the best class so far. I'm quite surprised at how easily we're all working together, even with new groups each week. We're accomplishing a lot in a short period of time.

I was terribly proud of the pasta. It's something I've always wanted to make but never had the courage (or the pasta machine) to do. I think a past mahine will find its way into our kitchen soon.

The only "complaint" I had about tonight ... I wish I had thought to come in early and bake a couple baguettes. They would have been perfect for soaking up the extra sauce!

A.

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It all looks excellent! Good work and it seems everyone is enjoying the class. Maybe I should write Santa and provide a hint what I'd like in my stocking... a class at the NWCAV?

Brian

House of Q

Brian Misko

House of Q - Competition BBQ

www.houseofq.com

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Daddy-A works his like a pro.  Look at the length!!

PICT0014.sized.jpg

I was terribly proud of the pasta. It's something I've always wanted to make but never had the courage (or the pasta machine) to do. I think a past mahine will find its way into our kitchen soon.

A.

Warning. This course will make you spend more money by convincing you that you need yet more kitchen gadgets. So far, I have bought a new chef's knife because the one I have cannot be comfortably held with the pinch grip. I am contemplating on getting a smoker because of Daddy-A and the Tuesday evening student who attended a Monday class with a plate full of barbeque short ribs and pulled pork. I am probably going to pick up a pasta machine so I can make my own stuffed pastas, etc.

I am glad it's just not me...

Alex

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^ Alex,

The second greatest thing about this class is the networking and ability to draw resources from fellow classmates. So when can I borrow your pasta maker, food mill, pasta roller and knife?

:raz:

"There are two things every chef needs in the kitchen: fish sauce and duck fat" - Tony Minichiello

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Yes Rustichella is a brand of pasta and they make different kinds.  You can find them at Gourmet Warehouse and other fine vendors.  You will notice that they are different from other pastas because the pasta is "rough" in texture.  Imagine sauce sticking to the rough surface...oh man.  It's like hundreds if little spoons attached to the pasta! 

They manage this (according to chef Tony) by feeding the pasta through a stone die instead of the standard nylon used in most pasta makers (nylon is FAST but makes for a smooth pasta like you see in primo or catelli).  The stone one is much slower.  I believe he also said the pasta is dried outside in the sun versus with fans. 

Bear in mind that other Italian-made pastas such as Barillo or De Cecco are made using brass dies which, though not as rough as stone, also increase the amount of friction between the die and the dough as it's passing through. This produces a rougher-textured pasta than Canadian-made brands and enables the noodle to soak up more flavour from the salted pasta water and the sauce itself. "Remember: the flavour is all on the outside."

Joie Alvaro Kent

"I like rice. Rice is great if you're hungry and want 2,000 of something." ~ Mitch Hedberg

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For everyone out there like me who wanted to go this time, but didn't....anyone want to attend the next class?  I believe it starts January 23rd and costs $695.

i just might join you at that class!

i'm taking the fine pastries with chocolate one tonight and tomorrow night. :biggrin:

Quentina

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Does the lemon curd recipe contain whole eggs, or only yolks? Here's my favourite lemon curd recipe...you can see how it compares to the one used in class, if you like. Also, you can use some cornstarch to thicken the lemon curd when you're cooking it. This recipe is not too thin to be used in cookies...I smear it between thin shortbread cookies (also use cornstarch in my shortbread, just like for pastry).

lemon curd

Ling: thanks for the tips. Our recipe has whole eggs, and does use corn starch but only to prevent curdling of the egg whites on direct heat (or so I understood from Chef Tony). I was wondering if I could use corn starch as a thickener during cooking, now I will try it out.

Moosh: I agree, I was totally in a zen state during pasta stuffing. We have tried making stuffed pasta at home many times but they have never survived the boiling process, so it may be time for another go.

Arne: I have a pasta roller which I would be willing to temporarily trade for another "gadget" - say a bullet?? Actually just make that a bucket of pulled pork...

Fud: of all the unflattering pix of me on the internet, that one of me rolling pasta is the new king. Yeesh. Perhaps I should change my nickname to Deer-In-Headlights. Oh and as for length, mine was so long I had to cut it into thirds. Whoops, that didn't sound as good as I was hoping.

PS: Biscotti was excellent; I have never had good biscotti so until yesterday I thought I hated it. Not so. The lemon, nuts and (surprise!) fennel seeds work so well together and the texture of the cookie is much better than the doorstops they serve elsewhere. And the cornmeal! I'm pretty sure Joe Peschi would be so appreciative after those that he would not shoot you in the back - or side - of the head.

Edited by BCinBC (log)
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I was wondering if I could use corn starch as a thickener during cooking, now I will try it out.

Yes you can. I use corn starch a lot actually in cooking thai food because it's "faster" than reducing but of course the results are not as tastey since the flavours don't concentrate as they do in reducing. Make sure to dissolve the corn starch in water BEFORE you add it (and I add it off the heat) to prevent ugly clumping.

Fud: of all the unflattering pix of me on the internet, that one of me rolling pasta is the new king. Yeesh. Perhaps I should change my nickname to Deer-In-Headlights. Oh and as for length, mine was so long I had to cut it into thirds. Whoops, that didn't sound as good as I was hoping.

:raz: I'm a fan of action shots. I promise next time I'll have you weilding the shun like a shaolin master chef!

"There are two things every chef needs in the kitchen: fish sauce and duck fat" - Tony Minichiello

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Nothing like going into the zone with the pasta-stuffing. I don't know if they would ever come quickly, but they would all be OCD-delicious and cute. I was really pleased with how my pasta came out! thanks, Alex, for sacrificing your batch to the recalcitrant machine.

One thing about the class...I made all of my tortelloni little "innies" witih one pasta flap over the other, as demonstrated; but my co-folders tended to just stick them together like praying hands...

Joe Pesci would not have been pleased. :hmmm:

Agenda-free since 1966.

Foodblog: Power, Convection and Lies

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I was wondering if I could use corn starch as a thickener during cooking, now I will try it out.

Make sure to dissolve the corn starch in water BEFORE you add it (and I add it off the heat) to prevent ugly clumping.

You can also dissolve the cornstarch in your lemon juice, before adding it to the sugar. :smile:

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I was wondering if I could use corn starch as a thickener during cooking, now I will try it out.

Yes you can. I use corn starch a lot actually in cooking thai food because it's "faster" than reducing but of course the results are not as tastey since the flavours don't concentrate as they do in reducing. Make sure to dissolve the corn starch in water BEFORE you add it (and I add it off the heat) to prevent ugly clumping.
Fud: of all the unflattering pix of me on the internet, that one of me rolling pasta is the new king. Yeesh. Perhaps I should change my nickname to Deer-In-Headlights. Oh and as for length, mine was so long I had to cut it into thirds. Whoops, that didn't sound as good as I was hoping.

:raz: I'm a fan of action shots. I promise next time I'll have you weilding the shun like a shaolin master chef!

Thanks Wes, but 2 points:

1. Being Chinese I'm very aware of corn starch as a thickener; in the above post I meant specifically for lemon curd.

2. Henckels!

I was wondering if I could use corn starch as a thickener during cooking, now I will try it out.

Make sure to dissolve the corn starch in water BEFORE you add it (and I add it off the heat) to prevent ugly clumping.

You can also dissolve the cornstarch in your lemon juice, before adding it to the sugar. :smile:

This is the same stage at which we were told to add the CS to prevent curdling, so in essence I'd just be adding more. Perhaps what I'll do is reserve a bit of lemon juice, add CS, then if it looks like it needs thickening during cooking, I'll add as necessary. Cheers!

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^ Sorry BCinBC I have been corrected, Nathan had the Kershaw Shun not you. I thought you were weilding the dazzling demascus patterned knife.

Oh and Second correction - using cornstarch in lemon curd is new to me too...pretty cool way to stabilize the curd/pudding and make it thick (?!).

I made biscotti last night and added irish creme. Not a bad choice. Maybe Grand Marnier next time :) Definate changes:

1. Less Cornmeal - more flour

2. Less Fennel and more Irish Creme :biggrin:

3. A bit of vanilla

4. Duck Fat

(Ok How many people's eyes did this? :blink: )

#4 was for moosh.

"There are two things every chef needs in the kitchen: fish sauce and duck fat" - Tony Minichiello

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One thing about the class...I made all of my tortelloni little "innies" witih one pasta flap over the other, as demonstrated...

It's a good thing that you did, since tortellini are supposed to represent the navel of Venus. Go figure. :blink:

This evening, I replicated our Lamb Stew recipe for some friends with a couple of slight modifications: pancetta instead of bacon, lemon gremolata instead of orange, and sweet-potato mash instead of yam. As noted in my post on the Dinner! thread, the end product was just as tasty as the stew we made in class. :smile:

Joie Alvaro Kent

"I like rice. Rice is great if you're hungry and want 2,000 of something." ~ Mitch Hedberg

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OK!

Class tonight: the fresh "crab cake" with pineapple salsa, mmm, mmm, good! plated with (fresh!) mayonnaise and sweet Thai chili sauce and lobster oil.

PA310002.jpg

My cider vinegar, red wine, cassis syrup and pomegranate reduction for seared quail breasts, reducing:

PA310004.jpg

And the plated quail, atop quail confit and squash risotto:

PA310005.jpg

There was also crème brûlée, but I forgot to take a picture! Chef made that for us though.

I am soooo full! Very full night!

Quote of the night from Chef:

"How do you know when it's sauce? It's sexy!"

Or maybe the line about eating pomegranates and watermelons in the shower, with the juice...:hmmm:

You've gotta love Chef Tony! :biggrin:

Agenda-free since 1966.

Foodblog: Power, Convection and Lies

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I didn't have a camera this class but it was jam packed with goodness. Any class where we get to use duck fat and bacon and butter and fish sauce can't be bad. Not to mention Quail Confit and Crab.

My god I'm in heaven :wub:

Some memorable quotes:

On making a dish too rich

------------------------------

"Your first bite is great! Your last bite, you'll want to cut off you finger!"

"If you eat this every day and work a desk job, it'll kill you!"

On Pomegranates

----------------------

"I LOVE pomegranates, I'll take one with me into the shower with a chair and eat it. That and watermellon, I like to get my mouth right in there with the juice flowing all over my face. Delicious!"

On facial masks

------------------

"All these ridiculous masks, just take some duck fat and put it on your face! Better yet fill your bathtub with it!" - [this is an approximation as I was laughing too hard to actually right it down verbatim]

My god. What a class!

"There are two things every chef needs in the kitchen: fish sauce and duck fat" - Tony Minichiello

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I must say that I have really enjoyed reading this thread, and seeing the thrill in doing what you are doing. Welcome to my world! :wacko: As I am fond of saying, keep doing what you're doing, only way faster.

I wonder why Camosun doesn't offer a similar program. Maybe if they had a fun, interactive office program for people like me!

Seriously though, the food looks amazing, and I think you should all feel proud.

-- Matt.

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I wonder why Camosun doesn't offer a similar program.  Maybe if they had a fun, interactive office program for people like me!

You could come and teach a class (or two). It would certainly make for an interesting and all round educational experience :biggrin:

Best way to learn is to teach!

"There are two things every chef needs in the kitchen: fish sauce and duck fat" - Tony Minichiello

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great pictures, deborah! wow, everything looked so delicious. i can almost taste the duck fat!

thanks to all you guys' enthusiasm and my great experience in chef marco's class, i'm now officially enrolled in the jan program of serious foodies!! duck fat, here i come! :biggrin:

Edited by makanmakan (log)

Quentina

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I didn't have a camera this class but it was jam packed with goodness.

Sure you did... you were wielding my camera with great ease! My pictorial for this class is, clearly, a joint effort. And I'll be sure to give credit to Wes where credit is due.

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Pineapple Salsa

How's that for amateur knife cuts?! :wink:

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Me plating our Crab Salad (Wes's photo)

What this photo doesn't show are the diligent efforts of both Wes and Alex who painstakingly took the meat out of our half crab while I chopped up our salsa.

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Brian on plating duty for his group (Wes's photo)

With Arne in the background, scratching his head and wondering why Brian was so insistent on a better photo than the one from pasta class. :laugh:

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Crab Salad closeup (Wes's photo)

Damn, Wes, that's one sexy shot! Malheureusement, Wes's closeup of the Lobster Oil bottle was too blurred out to include. Despite Chef Tony's suggestions for purposeful, minimalist plating and threats of bodily harm from me, Wes was still threatening to "go all Jackson Pollock" with his artistry. :raz:

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Crab Salad with Pineapple Salsa and Spicy Asian Remoulade, finished with Lobster Oil

Wine Pairing: Gazela Vinho Verde

Although we went the fresh salad versus the fried crabcake route due to time constraints, this was a damn tasty dish. There will be more platings of this in my future, I can guarantee that.

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Risotto cooking

My first risotto ever. Thanks to my two groupmates, Alex and Wes, for letting me go through the process.

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Our blackcurrant/pomegranate/red wine reduction in its early stages

No sage left, so we improvised with thyme.

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Alex working his culinary magic

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Squash/Pumpkin-Seed Risotto with Roast and Confit Quail

Wine Pairing: Casillero del Diablo 2004 Merlot

The blackcurrant/red wine/pomegranate reduction was lovely... wonderfully complimentary to both the risotto and the seared quail breasts. This dish was followed up by the dessert that Chef Tony had demonstrated for us at the beginning of class: Star Anise Crème Brûlée with Ganâche. No wonder we were all so full.

As Wes has already said, it was quite a class. Chef Tony is hiliarious. You've just gotta appreciate a man who says, "Crème Brûlée is the perfect breakfast food. Breakfast food has to be rich... it sets you for the day!"

Edited by Mooshmouse (log)

Joie Alvaro Kent

"I like rice. Rice is great if you're hungry and want 2,000 of something." ~ Mitch Hedberg

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As Wes has already said, it was quite a class.  Chef Tony is hiliarious.  You've just gotta appreciate a man who says, "Crème Brûlée is the perfect breakfast food.  Breakfast food has to be rich... it sets you for the day!"

He's my kind of guy. :wink:

The risotto looks good. I could use a big bowl of that right now. :smile:

I'm curious about the type of rice you all used. I use arborio rice for risotto, but I remember reading that Carnaroli and Vialone nano (I had to Google the last one :wink: ) can also be used, and that Vialone nano is actually better than arborio. Did Chef Tony talk about the other types of rice used? (And can we get Carnaroli and Vialone nano in Vancouver?)

Also, is there a difference between the brands of arborio rice? The one I buy comes in a green plastic bag. (I tried looking for it in the cupboard to find out the name, but it looks like I'm out.)

Edited by Ling (log)
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