Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

eG Foodblog: Susan in FL - Food and Drink Celebrations


Susan in FL
 Share

Recommended Posts

The pizza looks yummy.  What dough recipe did Russ use?  Did the pizza suffer from lack of sauce?

Hey Randi!

I'm not Susan, but I never use sauce on my homemade pizza. I think it's delicious without it!! I do put olive oil on the crust, though.

Edited by daniellewiley (log)

Danielle Altshuler Wiley

a.k.a. Foodmomiac

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Susan, that pizza looks ridiculously good. Nice work! :biggrin:

Plus, cucumbers are my all-time favorite food (odd, I know). You've won my stomach! :laugh:

Edited by Megan Blocker (log)

"We had dry martinis; great wing-shaped glasses of perfumed fire, tangy as the early morning air." - Elaine Dundy, The Dud Avocado

Queenie Takes Manhattan

eG Foodblogs: 2006 - 2007

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Yummy blog, Susan! The birthday boy is very lucky, and I hope he knows it.

That's an interesting technique for dry-frying the shrimp. Would you say you need non-stick to pull it off? And I found myself worrying over the sight of the already-cooked shrimp going onto the uncooked pizza - did they manage to stay tender after the heat of getting the dough cooked? The result was certainly gorgeous.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Another brief greeting... I am posting from a coffeehouse where I had a smoked turkey wrap and a Cafe Mocha. Most noteworthy is that this is the first time I've ever gone into an eating place and found wireless internet access!! But now I have to get back to work, so more this evening.....

Life is short; eat the cheese course first.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Wendy and others on the Dinner! thread got me wanting to do something with figs, so I roasted some, and stuffed them with gorgonzola -- half with mountain gorgonzola and half with gorgonzola dolce -- and wrapped them in prosciutto. There was not a dramatic difference in the flavor of the two. They were good, but I'm not so crazy over figs, so I probably won't fix this often.

gallery_13038_1496_152913.jpg

gallery_13038_1496_28671.jpg

susan- next time stuff with the gorgonzola, drape with the prosciutto THEN roast.

what kind of figs did you use?

am loving this thread and the best to russ for health and happiness in the next year.

Nothing is better than frying in lard.

Nothing.  Do not quote me on this.

 

Linda Ellerbee

Take Big Bites

Link to comment
Share on other sites

First I must say to everybody, your comments and encouragement are great. They provide quite an impetus to keep at this! I hope you enjoy reading it half as much as I enjoy photographing the food, posting, and reading your feedback.

This morning my work day started with a meeting at the main "headquarters" of Hospice of Volusia Flagler, my part time day job. No food was provided for an 8 AM meeting. What kind of meeting is that? There was not a big turn-out and I told the manager that if she wanted people to show up, she better announce that at the least, coffee and donuts would be served.

This is not very exciting, but it's part of logging in the food of the day. This is the little cafe that we have at work. It is for employees, and the families of the patients in our in-patient unit. It was slim pickins by the time I got there. I bought a banana. The chef actually does a great job. He's professionally trained and cooks all his dishes, and bakes, from scratch. Lunches are really good, and it's all reasonably priced.

gallery_13038_1496_100520.jpg

gallery_13038_1496_37898.jpg

Life is short; eat the cheese course first.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

After my meeting in Port Orange this morning, I headed to the west part of the county, which is about 20 miles inland. I didn't get to steal much time for signing on, as I had hoped. In between visits today, I stopped at the Orange City location of Boston Gourmet Coffeehouse.

That is where I found wireless access, as mentioned above. I took a lunch break and ate lunch, which is highly unusual for me (blame it on foodblogging :biggrin: ), and I bravely opened up my laptop and anxiously awaited what would happen and wondered how I would know if it was a "hot spot." A box popped up and told me I had BostonWiFi. I acted like I knew all about such things, and proceeded to eat my wrap and sip my coffee drink, and sign on to eGullet briefly. I felt so proud of myself, like I was technologically advanced or something; but I confess, I would have been too embarrassed to pull out my camera and photograph my food on top of all that.

The Cafe Mocha (espresso, chocolate syrup, steamed milk, and whipped cream) was wonderful, and the smoked turkey and ham wrap was good, too.

Life is short; eat the cheese course first.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Rita poured rain on us all day and I started whining to myself about it, but then I immediately reminded myself that I should only count my blessings and be glad that all we have gotten from this hurricane is wind and rain, and not loss of life or destruction.

So tonight, instead of letting our picnic be rained out, we brought it inside! We thought about waiting another day for good weather, but there are other dinner plans for the next two nights. Tomorrow night will be our usual Friday night happy hours, and Saturday night is part of the Daytona Beach Wine Festival.

I did some preparation ahead late last night, roasting potatoes and some chopping, and did the rest after work tonight while sipping on a beer.

gallery_13038_1496_74886.jpg

I've gotten some good ideas for picnics from this book by Pamela Sheldon Johns and Jennifer Barry, and made the recipe for Roasted New Potato Salad with Pancetta-Rosemary dressing. Beautiful pancetta...

gallery_13038_1496_46532.jpg

gallery_13038_1496_20057.jpg

I got Russ in a picture last night, so he got me back tonight. I had planned to include a photo of one of our huge rosemary plants in this blog, but he took care of getting the picture while I was getting the rosemary for the potato salad dressing. This one is now taller than I am.

gallery_13038_1496_21302.jpg

The potato salad went with chicken salad, and here, the chicken is cooking. Using the pan drippings and brown bits in the chicken salad dressing made it really good. I used boneless chicken, breast and thighs. I'm not as fond of chicken breasts, but surprisingly, I prefer breast meat in chicken salad. Still, it was tasty.

gallery_13038_1496_168367.jpg

So... this looks rather odd, but what we did was put beach towels on the rug in front of the TV and ate on the floor, sitting propped against our couch. Not the first time we've done such a thing, but it's the first time we've admitted it publicly. We had some blue cheese, Roquefort and Roaring 40's. We drank one of the bottles of Cabernet that came from our wine club Tuesday, the Morenzy Cellars.

gallery_13038_1496_112655.jpg

Life is short; eat the cheese course first.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Next:

The Foodblog bus takes a trip back north, for a heavy week of food porn, deep in the heart of Pennsylvania.  :wink: .......

I see the next blogger is from Pennsylvania.  I think it's fun to guess who's next.

Percy? Does Percy live in PA??

.......Maybe you will think about doing the legs as confit?

.......Remember to save some of that duck fat and those duck thighs and legs for duck confit, followed if you wish by cassoulet.  Then you can make us drool with even more lovely pictures.  :cool:

I have thought about duck confit, and all this time I wondered how long it would take to save up so much duck fat. It never occured to me that it would be store bought. Duh! Thanks so much for the link to the confit topic. What a great thread! And the link to the Cassoulet Cook-off, I hadn't read that one.

.....and you'll have to look for Lillet, it's in the wine section of the stores and is best served on ice with an orange slice.

Thank you, I will look for it.

Life is short; eat the cheese course first.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Susan, great blog am enjoying it greatly.

Is the Roaring 40's from King Island? If so that is one of my favourite blue's and I had no idea it had made it all the way to the US.

I love the fact that the blogs now all have such great photos. Way back in the depths of time when I did mine there was nary a photo to be seen. Maybe I'll have to volunteer again soon and try taking some photos that look half as good as yours. :smile:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Susan, just saw your blog and am really looking forward to the week.  I am missing Florida and we're hoping to get down to visit family in November...maybe...if I can get a dogsitter....etc.....oh, I hope so, just in time for stone crab!

The duck looked wonderful, I'm doing duck with a sour cherry sauce for a dinner party on Friday.  Belated birthday and moving anniversary wishes.

Thanks, and nice to hear from you... I have forgotten where your family is in Florida, and did you make it for the 2005 Daytona 500? And thanks for reminding me of stone crab season! When does it start?

Good luck with your dinner party tomorrow night. Please let us know how it goes.

The pizza looks yummy.  What dough recipe did Russ use?  Did the pizza suffer from lack of sauce?

I think the recipe for the dough was from Cooking.com. It had equal parts all-purpose flour and semolina flour -- first time to use semolina flour in pizza dough. We will probably use it again, but play around with the proportions. About the sauce, what Danielle said. :smile: We use olive oil on the dough, as well. The only time I use sauce on homemade pizza is when I make the traditional Americanized version with sauce, mozzarella, pepperoni, etc.

From Central Maine to you Susan in FL.

Don’t know if you ever had, or even like “Jalapeno Pepper Jelly”, but about 15 years ago, while visiting my wife’s Grandmother in Daytona Beach (also a brother-in-law in Ormond Beach), I discovered the Farmers Market on Saturdays in Daytona .

At it was a vendor who had this Jelly, since then I was hooked.

Not getting to DB too often (Grandma passed), I have it shipped to me twice a year 12 jars. Delightful just great on Bagels over a fine Goatsmilk or Sheepsmilk Cheese.

Anyway here is the address:

Ocie (Al) McConnehead, 731 Heineman St., Daytona Beach FL  32019 386-290-4337

One more thing:

"Gaylords"(Sp?) on the road to Port Orange, past the Dunlawton Ave. Bridge used to serve the most outstand 'Prime Rib of Beef'. Does it still excist?

It's always good to hear from someone who knows this area. The Flea Market is something, isn't it?! It's huge. What a trip. (Click here for a more vivid description.)

I've never heard of the restaurant, so I'm thinking it must be out of business. I have a friend who knows restaurant history of the Daytona Beach area, and I'll ask her.

Yummy blog, Susan!  The birthday boy is very lucky, and I hope he knows it.

That's an interesting technique for dry-frying the shrimp.  Would you say you need non-stick to pull it off?  And I found myself worrying over the sight of the already-cooked shrimp going onto the uncooked pizza - did they manage to stay tender after the heat of getting the dough cooked?  The result was certainly gorgeous.

I think you probably do need a good non-stick pan for the shrimp. Mushrooms, as discussed in that thread, no... they release so much liquid, it's not a concern.

The shrimp on this pizza did remain tender, and moist too. It they had been smaller or chopped up, perhaps I would not have cooked them ahead. I'm happy to say the taste was as good as it looked.

Life is short; eat the cheese course first.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

susan- next time stuff with the gorgonzola, drape with the prosciutto THEN roast.

what kind of figs did you use? 

Thanks for the good wishes.

Interesting that you mentioned that, Suzi... I saw in the Dinner! thread that Wendy and you roasted them with the prosciutto. I was going to do that, but I cringed at the thought of cooking/roasting this good prosciutto. (I think I recall correctly that the figs were Black Mission.)

Comments, anyone?

Life is short; eat the cheese course first.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Is the Roaring 40's from King Island?  If so that is one of my favourite blue's and I had no idea it had made it all the way to the US.

Yes, it is! The only place I've seen it so far is iGourmet. It is soooo good.

Thanks for the kind words.

Life is short; eat the cheese course first.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I noticed in your picture of the goodies from igourmet that you had received the Maggie Beer Verjuice too. Do you get many Australian products from there? If they have the Maggie Beer Quince Paste it goes amazingly well with the Roaring 40's :wub:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks for the good wishes.

Interesting that you mentioned that, Suzi...  I saw in the Dinner! thread that Wendy and you roasted them with the prosciutto.  I was going to do that, but I cringed at the thought of cooking/roasting this good prosciutto.  (I think I recall correctly that the figs were Black Mission.)

Comments, anyone?

8 minutes or so at 400. works beautifully.

love the pictures - makes me wish i had time to figure out how to up load from johnnybird's camera - maybe if we get a rain day :rolleyes:

Nothing is better than frying in lard.

Nothing.  Do not quote me on this.

 

Linda Ellerbee

Take Big Bites

Link to comment
Share on other sites

gallery_13038_1496_109286.jpg

Good Morning. Even though there was not a lot of sunshine this morning, the blue blossoms were out, looking for it. At least it's not raining so far today. As it unfortunately gets worse elsewhere, the weather seems to be improving here.

On the agenda today is a manicure and pedicure -- Woo Hoo! -- and happy hour food & drink for dinner.

Life is short; eat the cheese course first.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I noticed in your picture of the goodies from igourmet that you had received the Maggie Beer Verjuice too.  Do you get many Australian products from there?
I think this was the first time for the Australian products from iGourmet.com. I had been wanting to try both Roaring 40's and Verjuice for quite a while, and this particular Verjuice appealed to me the most from its description on that site. It might be my new current favorite ingredient.
If they have the Maggie Beer Quince Paste it goes amazingly well with the Roaring 40's :wub:

Thanks, sounds good! I'll check.

It was interesting when I was first searching for Roaring 40's Blue. It is listed in iCheeses.com. When you click to purchase it there, it takes you to Amazon.com, and then when you click to purchase it there, you end up purchasing it from iGourmet.com.

I would love to see you do another foodblog from Australia! I hope you decide to volunteer.

Life is short; eat the cheese course first.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

8 minutes or so at 400.  works beautifully.
Thanks, Suzi. I probably will give it another try, cooking it like that.
love the pictures - makes me wish i had time to figure out how to up load from johnnybird's camera - maybe if we get a rain day :rolleyes:

Please do!

Life is short; eat the cheese course first.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Monica and All, I am glad you are enjoying it.

I've been waiting for the sun to shine more before taking some pictures of foodstuff growing in our yard, but this morning realized that the waiting could be endless, so here it is.

You saw the one rosemary bush. Here it is again with more in the background.

gallery_13038_1496_103648.jpg

To the left, the prickly pear cactus, and to the right, my avocado tree:

gallery_13038_1496_116639.jpg

This is a pineapple plant. We have yet to see a pineapple, but patience, patience... I have faith that we will see it someday.

gallery_13038_1496_73216.jpg

Most of the plants in our yard were given to us by patients or families that we have visited on the job. In a way, it's a memorial garden. Lots of stuff looks very young..... This is a year after the three direct hits by hurricanes, so there are way less trees in our backyard, and with some of the plantings, we started all over.

This is the lemongrass "patch" ...one of the die hards.

gallery_13038_1496_121943.jpg

And this is the part of our yard that we call the garden. It's usually mostly an herb garden. It is time for fall planting, and soon there will be new tomato plants.

gallery_13038_1496_82023.jpg

Life is short; eat the cheese course first.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

That rosemary bush is awesome, Susan.

They say that rosemary helps memory and erases forgetfulness.

I think perhaps I need to sleep under a huge rosemary tree, the way I have been lately. :biggrin:

Lovely blog, am enjoying it.

Shout a big "hey" from the hills to your hubby for a belated happy birthday!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

So I went for the manicure and pedicure today, and experienced such total relaxation for two hours... :wub:

What, you might ask, does this have to do with food & drink? Well for one thing, a glass of wine is always offered and today I certainly accepted. I sipped on a nice Chardonnay for the entire two hours. Food? When it was done, I went to another section of the spa and ate some really nice cookies. And also, it seems no matter where I go, the conversation turns to food, and so it did today. But I won't go into that right now. This is the place: The Riverview Hotel and Spa.

gallery_13038_1496_116899.jpg

It's a hotel (I think more aptly called an Inn), restaurant, spa, and giftshops. It's a beautiful place to relax. I could go on and on about this place, but would eventually get off the topic, so PM me if you want to know more. To make a long story short, if anyone wants to vacation in the Daytona Beach area and get away from the glitz and the crowds of families with screaming kids, New Smyrna Beach is the place to go. It's about 10 to 15 miles south of Daytona Beach.

Here is a shot of one of the gift shops, with lots of kitchen stuff handcrafted by local artists. Today I bought two sparkling wine glasses, which you will hopefully see pictured Sunday or Monday.

gallery_13038_1496_24114.jpg

This is the outside of the restaurant. We have gone here for Friday happy hour several times, and met here tonight. The food leaves something to be desired, but the atmosphere can't be beat on a beautiful sunny afternoon or evening. And yes today the sun did come out. It's on the intracoastal, the place to be in all of Florida, to look west and see the setting sun.

gallery_13038_1496_97147.jpg

And the "inside" ...actually the bar which is on the intracoastal. Russ got off work a little early, and I met him after my afternoon in New Smyrna Beach, and we were the first cocktail hour customers when they opened at 4:00 PM.

gallery_13038_1496_35883.jpg

And ladies especially, take a look at this. Isn't this a nice looking manicu ...uh ...glass of wine?

gallery_13038_1496_41171.jpg

Life is short; eat the cheese course first.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

When Russ met me after he got off work, we started with drinks and the obligatory bar snacks.

gallery_13038_1496_20473.jpg

Then we ordered an appetizer of parmesan-dusted calamari. As expected, good but not great. However, the views are worth the price at this spot.

gallery_13038_1496_2845.jpg

Life is short; eat the cheese course first.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.
 Share

  • Similar Content

    • By liuzhou
      Note: This follows on from the Munching with the Miao topic.
       
      The three-hour journey north from Miao territory ended up taking four, as the driver missed a turning and we had to drive on to the next exit and go back. But our hosts waited for us at the expressway exit and led us up a winding road to our destination - Buyang 10,000 mu tea plantation (布央万亩茶园 bù yāng wàn mǔ chá yuán) The 'mu' is  a Chinese measurement of area equal to 0.07 of a hectare, but the 10,000 figure is just another Chinese way of saying "very large".
       
      We were in Sanjiang Dong Autonomous County, where 57% of the inhabitants are Dong.
       
      The Dong people (also known as the Kam) are noted for their tea, love of glutinous rice and their carpentry and architecture. And their hospitality. They tend to live at the foot of mountains, unlike the Miao who live in the mid-levels.
       
      By the time we arrived, it was lunch time, but first we had to have a sip of the local tea. This lady did the preparation duty.
       

       

       
      This was what we call black tea, but the Chinese more sensibly call 'red tea'. There is something special about drinking tea when you can see the bush it grew on just outside the window!
       
      Then into lunch:
       

       

      Chicken Soup
       

      The ubiquitous Egg and Tomato
       

      Dried fish with soy beans and chilli peppers. Delicious.
       

      Stir fried lotus root
       

      Daikon Radish
       

      Rice Paddy Fish Deep Fried in Camellia Oil - wonderful with a smoky flavour, but they are not smoked.
       

      Out of Focus Corn and mixed vegetable
       

      Fried Beans
       

      Steamed Pumpkin
       

      Chicken
       

      Beef with Bitter Melon
       

      Glutinous (Sticky) Rice
       

      Oranges
       

      The juiciest pomelo ever. The area is known for the quality of its pomelos.
       
      After lunch we headed out to explore the tea plantation.
       

       

       

       

       
      Interspersed with the tea plants are these camellia trees, the seeds of which are used to make the Dong people's preferred cooking oil.
       

       
      As we climbed the terraces we could hear singing and then came across this group of women. They are the tea pickers. It isn't tea picking time, but they came out in their traditional costumes to welcome us with their call and response music. They do often sing when picking. They were clearly enjoying themselves.
       

       
      And here they are:
       
       
      After our serenade we headed off again, this time to the east and the most memorable meal of the trip. Coming soon.
       
       
    • By FoodMuse
      Hello everyone,
      eGullet was nice enough to invite me to write a food blog chronicling what I've made or eaten out for one week. I'm so excited about it! Thanks guys.
      About me:
      I dream about food, I wake thinking what's for dinner and I'm so excited to share it with you. I'm part of the food world in New York. By that, I just mean that I'm so fortunate enough to be invited to great events where I get to eat great food. I'm also a nerd and a part of the technology world. I produce, edit and sometimes host food related web videos and I'm also a part of the tech world.
      I'm launching a website called Please, Pass the Gravy. www.pleasepassthegravy.com We let you create a menu, invite friends and then collaborate on that menu. Never host another potluck with 8 pasta salads. You could use it now, but we're alpha launch, it works but it's ugly. It's my ugly baby. So, if you use it be kind and message me if you have improvement ideas. I thought it would be ok to write about it here because it is food related.
      I live in Brooklyn with a lovely guy who likes to eat and a small corgi mix dog. I cook pretty much every night and do a nice brunch on the weekend. I am not a crazy dog lady, but I do admit to cooking food for the dog. I have an excuse, beyond doting, he had seizures that have stopped since not feeding him dog food.
      Foods I cook:
      Spicy foods! If you look at my blog I have a simple papaya ketchup with habanero that is pretty darn good.
      I love great cheese. This may be the week for Beer Cheese Soup.
      I try to limit carbs, though I do cheat.
      In any given week C. and I probably eat cauliflower, broccoli and green beans as a side.
      Tonight's dinner will be Vietnamese inspired. We'll see how it goes. I'll post about it as soon as I can.
      Any requests? Questions? I'd love to hear from you.
      -Grace
    • By Duvel
      In these challenging times, a full summer vacation is not an easy task. For the last 1.5 years we have been mostly at home with the clear plan to visit Catalonia (or more precise my wife’s family) latest this summer. And it looked good for a while. Unfortunately, the recent rise in case numbers in Spain have resulted in …
       
      OK, let’s skip this part. Long story short - my wife and me are fully vaccinated, as are >90% of the people we care about in Catalonia. After some discussion (after all, Germans tend to prefer to be on the safe side of things) we simply fueled up the car, got each a test (for the transit through France) and started to drive …
       
      After a leisurely 11h drive we arrived at a small fishing town somewhat north of Barcelona around 3.00am. We unloaded the car and my wife an the little one went straight to bed. 
       

       


      I found an expired beer in the elsewise pretty empty fridge and enjoyed the cool breeze on the terrace. Holidays, here we come …
       

    • By liuzhou
      Last week, Liuzhou government invited a number of diplomats from Laos, Malaysia, Indonesia, Myanmar/Burma, Poland, and Germany to visit the city and prefecture. They also invited me along. We spent Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday introducing the diplomats to the culture of the local ethnic groups and especially to their food culture.
       
      First off, we headed two hours north into the mountains of Rongshui Miao Autonomous County. The Miao people (苗族 miáo zú), who include the the Hmong, live in the mid-levels of mountains and are predominantly subsistence farmers. Our first port of call was the county town, also Rongshui (融水 róng shuǐ, literal meaning: Melt Water) where we were to have lunch. But before lunch we had to go meet some people and see their local crafts. These are people I know well from my frequent work trips to the area, but for the diplomats, it was all new.
       
      So, I had to wait for lunch, and I see no reason why you shouldn't either. Here are some of the people I live and work with.


       
      This lovely young woman is wearing the traditional costume of an unmarried girl. Many young women, including her, wear this every day, but most only on festive occasions.
       
      Her hat is made from silver (and is very heavy). Here is a closer look.
       

       
      Married women dispense with those gladrags and go for this look:
       

       
      As you can see she is weaving bamboo into a lantern cover.
       
      The men tend to go for this look, although I'm not sure that the Bluetooth earpiece for his cellphone is strictly traditional.
       

       
      The children don't get spared either
       

       
      This little girl is posing with the Malaysian Consul-General.
       
      After meeting these people we went on to visit a 芦笙 (lú shēng) workshop. The lusheng is a reed wind instrument and an important element in the Miao, Dong and Yao peoples' cultures.
       

       

       
      Then at last we headed to the restaurant, but as is their custom, in homes and restaurants, guests are barred from entering until they go through the ritual of the welcoming cup of home-brewed rice wine.
       


      The consular staff from Myanmar/Burma and Malaysia "unlock" the door.
       
      Then you have the ritual hand washing part.
       

       
      Having attended to your personal hygiene, but before  entering the dining room, there is one more ritual to go through. You arrive here and sit around this fire and wok full of some mysterious liquid on the boil.
       

       
      On a nearby table is this
       

       
      Puffed rice, soy beans, peanuts and scallion. These are ladled into bowls.
       

       
      with a little salt, and then drowned in the "tea" brewing in the wok.
       
      This is  油茶 (yóu chá) or Oil Tea. The tea is made from Tea Seed Oil which is made from the seeds of the camellia bush. This dish is used as a welcoming offering to guests in homes and restaurants. Proper etiquette suggests that three cups is a minimum, but they will keep refilling your cup until you stop drinking. First time I had it I really didn't like it, but I persevered and now look forward to it.
       

      L-R: Director of the Foreign Affairs Dept of Liuzhou government, consuls-general of Malaysia, Myanmar, Laos.
       
      Having partaken of the oil tea, finally we are allowed to enter the dining room, where two tables have been laid out for our use.
       

       
      Let the eating, finally, begin.
       
      In no particular order:
       

      Steamed corn, taro and sweet potato
       

      Bamboo Shoots
       

      Duck
       

      Banana leaf stuffed with sticky rice and mixed vegetables and steamed.
       

      Egg pancake with unidentified greenery
       

      Stir fried pork and beans
       

      Stir fried Chinese banana (Ensete lasiocarpum)
       

      Pig Ears
       

       
      This may not look like much, but was the star of the trip. Rice paddy fish, deep fried in camellia tree seed oil with wild mountain herbs. We ate this at every meal, cooked with slight variations, but never tired of it.
       

      Stir fried Greens
       
      Our meal was accompanied by the wait staff singing to us and serving home-made rice wine (sweetish and made from the local sticky rice).
       
       
       
       
      Everything we ate was grown or reared within half a kilometre of the restaurant and was all free-range, organic. And utterly delicious.
       
      Roll on dinner time.
       
      On the trip I was designated the unofficial official photographer and ended up taking 1227 photographs. I just got back last night and was busy today, so I will try to post the rest of the first day (and dinner) as soon as I can.
    • By shain
      It's been more than a year in which international travel was challenging to impossible, but gladly this is changing, as more countries are able to vaccinate their population.
      Greece had managed to return to a state of near normality, and opted to allow vaccinated individuals to enter. And so I decided to go on a slightly spontaneous vacation (only slightly, we still had almost a month for planning). To the trip I was joined by my father, to whom I owed some good one-on-one time and was able to travel on a short-ish notice.
       
       
      Many people are yet unable to travel, and many countries are suffering quite badly from the virus, and therefore I considered if I should wait some time with this post. However, I hope that it will instead be seen with an optimistic view, showing that back-to-normal is growing ever closer.
       
       
      We returned just a few days ago, and it will take me some time to organize my photos, so this is a teaser until then.
       
       
       
       
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.
×
×
  • Create New...