Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

Paris Restaurant Recommendations - 2008


Jeff L
 Share

Recommended Posts

I was not impressed with Au Camelot, neither the selection nor the quality. If you are looking generally in Bastille/Marais, and it doesn't have to be high-end, haute cuisine, I have a personal favorite for a simpler meal. That's Le Relais St. Paul. It's at 33, rue François Miron, near the St. Paul métro station. It`s small, romantic, not too noisy, and very friendly. When I was last there in April, new owners included one American, so at least one person there does speak English. Their speciality is southwest cooking. I went there first several years ago because (1) an aquaintance recommended it and (2) it was the only restaurant I could find that served cassoulet for one person. The cassoulet was wonderful, as has been the magret de canard (duck). In April I think the prix fixe was in the 23 - 26 € range for 2 or 3 courses.

Edited by RandyB (log)
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Am I correct that Le Comptoir is Moroccan influenced?

Has anyone tried C'amelot, Astier, la Chamarre or

        Le Temps au Temps?

Le Comptoir is definitely not Moroccan influenced at all.

And for what it's worth I've been to C' amelot, Astier and Le Temps au Temps and liked them all for different reasons. C'amelot is a tiny charming bistro , which when I was there, had no selection at all, meaning you get what they are serving that night (which is how Le Comptoir works in the evenings). Luckily, there's not much I won't eat, so this is not a problem but I could see how someone would be disappointed if they didn't know this. The food, as I remember, was very good and my friends and I loved it.

Astier is fun, crowded and CHEAP. They serve an enormous cheese tray so it's a nice place to sample french cheese. I don't remember the food being spectacular, but it was perfectly good and everyone left happy.

And Le Temps was one of my favorite places I've been to this year. It's a tiny restaurant run by a husband and wife team, with wonderful food and for the quality of the food, very low prices.

www.parisnotebook.wordpress.com

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Am I correct that Le Comptoir is Moroccan influenced?

Has anyone tried C'amelot, Astier, la Chamarre or

        Le Temps au Temps?

I've been to C'amelot, Astier and Le Temps au Temps and liked them all for different reasons.

I too think C'amelot + Temps au Temps are good, indeed the latter is terrific.

For Saturday and Sunday don't forget Reminet; for Saturday Grande Rue.

John Talbott

blog John Talbott's Paris

Link to comment
Share on other sites

-Where is Grande Rue? I haven't been able to locate it.

Thanks for the lead on Reminet.

-Funny, 'Le Comptoir Paris' keeps coming up on the

web w. Marakkesh along side of it! Do they serve

only a set meal or is there an a la carte menu?

-Temp au Temp sounds interesting & we will try

to add it on.

-No, we are not huge eaters....but it is so difficult

to resist trying the restaurants I read about on

egullet & in various magazines. Obviously, I need more

time in Paris!

-Has anyone visited Auguste?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

. . . .

C'amelot is a tiny charming bistro , which when I was there, had no selection at all, meaning you get what they are serving that night (which is how Le Comptoir works in the evenings).  Luckily, there's not much I won't eat, so this is not a problem but I could see how someone would be disappointed if they didn't know this.  The food, as I remember, was very good and my friends and I loved it.

. . . .

I could generally say the same about my tastes as well as about C'Amelot. As the fates would have it, the night we were there (some years back) they actually had a choice of two main courses. Interestingly enough, one of those choices was a dish I had chosen the night before at another restaurant, so I was fortunate to have had the choice. Had I not had any choice, I probaly would gone right ahead and had the same dish again and considered my self fortunate to be able to compare two different preparations. Whether one likes any restaurant depends on the person more often than the restaurant. Knowing why another likes a restaurant is usually far more important than knowing if he likes it.

We were there with another couple I knew only from the forum. They were charming people and we had a wonderful time. This was not destination food nor is it a destination restaurant, but it's the kind of place where you can enjoy good food in good company and forget you've come to Paris, but appreciate that you are in Paris. It's a far more personal eperience than one might get in a three star restaurant and at a very gentle price as I recall.

Robert Buxbaum

WorldTable

Recent WorldTable posts include: comments about reporting on Michelin stars in The NY Times, the NJ proposal to ban foie gras, Michael Ruhlman's comments in blogs about the NJ proposal and Bill Buford's New Yorker article on the Food Network.

My mailbox is full. You may contact me via worldtable.com.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I could generally say the same about my tastes as well as about C'Amelot. As the fates would have it, the night we were there (some years back) they actually had a choice of two main courses.

Ah, as usual, Bux has put his finger on the only problem with C'Amelot, one has to pick between two choices, so if you're four, as we often are, it's not as much fun as elsewhere.

As for La Grande Rue, of course, it's on the longest street in Paris, the rue de Vaugirard, 117 to be precise, 01.47.34.96.12, and like Temps Au Temps is run by a charming husband & wife team and a helper, Aurelian, age about 5.

John Talbott

blog John Talbott's Paris

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Ah, as usual, Bux has put his finger on the only problem with C'Amelot, one has to pick between two choices, . . .

My understanding is that more often than not, there's no choice for two of the three courses. In their defense, I can only say that I thought the prices reflected the economy of the kitchen, but many will be willing to pay a bit more for choice. Of course it's also a poor choice for anyone with dietary restrictions.

Robert Buxbaum

WorldTable

Recent WorldTable posts include: comments about reporting on Michelin stars in The NY Times, the NJ proposal to ban foie gras, Michael Ruhlman's comments in blogs about the NJ proposal and Bill Buford's New Yorker article on the Food Network.

My mailbox is full. You may contact me via worldtable.com.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

-Where is Grande Rue? I haven't been able to locate it.

Thanks for the lead on Reminet.

-Funny, 'Le Comptoir Paris' keeps coming up on the

web w. Marakkesh along side of it! Do they serve

only a set meal or is there an a la carte menu?

-Temp au Temp sounds interesting & we will try

to add it on.

-No, we are not huge eaters....but it is so difficult

to resist trying the restaurants I read about on

egullet & in various magazines. Obviously, I need more

time in Paris!

-Has anyone visited Auguste?

Le Comptoir Paris that is popping up is another restaurant. Yve's restaurant is called Le Relais de Comptoir. Search that and you will get the correct resto.

Is Grande Rue the name of a street,? It seems to me there is part of the name missing. You might want to double check.

Edited by raisab (log)

Paris is a mood...a longing you didn't know you had, until it was answered.

-An American in Paris

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Is Grande Rue the name of a street,? It seems to me there is part of the name missing. You might want to double check.

My feeble attempt at geography/humor.

As for La Grande Rue, of course, it's on the longest street in Paris, the rue de Vaugirard, 117 to be precise,

The longest street in Paris is the Rue de Vaugirard, thus they called their Restaurant La Grande Rue and it is at 117 Rue de Vaugirard.

As for Auguste, but of course, see here.

John Talbott

blog John Talbott's Paris

Link to comment
Share on other sites

As for La Grande Rue, of course, it's on the longest street in Paris, the rue de Vaugirard, 117 to be precise...

Rue Vaugirard is a difficult street to visualize because it runs through so many neighborhoods, something like the old saw about one's concept of an elephant being dependent on what part of the elephant you were feeling. That said (another feeble attempt at humor), La Grande Rue is immediately south of Boulevard Montparnasse, a portion of Vaugirard that I had never visited before.

eGullet member #80.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 years later...

Girlfriend of 3 years and I are headed to Paris the first week of March - I've just finished procuring a ring, and plan to propose on the trip!

Of course, I'm hoping everything will be magical - especially the food (we are both foodies and very excited about the trip). After a lot of research on here (seriously, I am likely to be fired soon if I don't stop doing eGullet at work), I've come up with a tentative plan and would love feedback.

We will be there between March 2-8 and are staying on Rue Lepic in the 18th. We don't speak any French, so keep that in mind as well.

Saturday

Lunch: Something casual in Monmartre (our overnight flight arrives at 9am so nothing too intense here.)

Dinner: Wally La Saharien

Sunday

Lunch: Brasserie? Need recommendation (Maybe bofinger?)

Dinner: Les Relaise de Venise

Monday

This is the planned big day - plan is to catch the train to Reims, have a picnic, tour taittinger, and stay/dine at Les Crayeres. Any thoughts (especially from someone knowledgable about Reims with possible proposal ideas?) would be GREATLY appreciated.

Tuesday

Lunch: Something in Reims - Haven't had a lot of luck figuring this out yet.

Dinner: Chez L'Ami Jean

Wednesday

Lunch: Les Elysees

Dinner: Chez Denise

Thursday

Lunch: Guy Savoy 100 Euro Lunch

Dinner: Something casual?

Friday

Lunch: Picnic at Parc Andre Citroen

Dinner: L'Ambrosie

That's all folks! My goal is to have a nice balance of different things (we've been to Paris together once before, but didn't have a great culinary sampling - just L'Table de Joel Robuchon) and of course to have an amazing engagment week. I've also tried not to overload any particular day with food, but let me know if I'm being crazy.

In addition to menu critiques (be harsh!), suggestions for other more spontaneous things not to miss would be greatly appreciated (I've already got Laduree and Pierre Hermes in mind; she's also mad about crepes, but reviews here about crepes in Paris haven't been that encouraging...)

The community here at the Paris board is amazing - very excited to see if anyone can help me give her the best week of our lives together!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Oh wow! Exciting stuff......

My wonderful husband recently planned an amazing trip to France for me, to celebrates our first wedding anniversary. It was truly magical, so I know you'll be able to make this such a wonderful occassion for your girlfriend.

Itinerary looks great. Can I suggest one thing for you to consider..... L'Assiette Champenoise at Reihms. See this post http://forums.egullet.org/index.php?showto...dpost&p=1514799

Eating lunch here was like one endless fantasy, and it's set in a beautiful garden. It was honestly the best meal of my life! The only catch is that they are closed all day on Tuesday, so you might consider doing this on Monday. A proposal could fit quite nicely ;) The staff here speak perfect English, and took amazing care for us, even though they didn't know it was our anniversary. So, I cannot begin to imagine what they would do if you were proposing!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

That is an awesome schedule. The only thing is: is it not too much? God knows I love all the restaurants you selected but isn't there a risk that exceptional experiences become less exceptional with that kind of abundance? And, on a more personal and maybe inappropriate note, aren't you overdoing it a bit? I mean, your girlfriend had better be a serious foodie to not be overwhelmed by that plan.

Anyway, Les Crayeres sounds like an ideal place to propose and spend the night. My favourite low key brasserie is La Rotonde but obviously Boffinger is fancier, le café de la Paix even more so. Chez Denise after les Elysées sounds like something for very strong stomachs. I would encourage random attitude for all the spots in your schedule where you haven't figured things out. You may find picnics in March a bit optimistic. Maybe the gods will be with you.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Yup, as a former tour guide and interpreter, I've seen countless young couples overwhelmed by an ambitious schedule. What looks do-able on paper might be too much after a long flight and a few unexpected hiccups.

In restaurants, you are in the public eye...I'd sacrifice some of those meals for impromptu if ordinary "finds", or even a chilly but more relaxed and private wander, wearing warm coats with pockets big enough to hold a paper bag of something nice and even a bottle!

...but your plans sound wonderful, anyway!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Make sure you book your Taittinger tour well in advance - most of the houses will only take pre booked visitors.

There are plenty of places to eat in Reims, leave it and just have a wander. there is an EXCELLENT boulangerie in the Boulevard Foch, just up from the Place d'Erlon. I can't remember its name - if you are going up the boulevard wtih the Place behind you, it is about 200m up on the right. Very modern looking, chocolatier et al.

totally agree with Piglit on the Lallement tip !

You might scrap Sunday meals in favour of a brunch ? Crillon is wonderful (we stayed there when I got engaged) and very central.

My random Paris thoughts...

Don't bother with Laduree. The cakes are not that great, it's very expensive and the service is not good

G detout on the Rue Tiquetonne (in the Les Halles are) is difficult to find, but a wonderful paradise of professional bakery ingredients to die for

Get an ice cream at Bertillon on the Ile St Louis - not at one of the shops advertising the ice creams, but at the Bertillon shop itself. they have wonderful flavours, get a cone and then go and sit out on the little embankment under the bridge by the Tour d'Argent. The salted butter caramel ice cream is out of this world. It's in the Rue St Louis, a trick to find but persevere.

I am sure I will have more throughout the day

Edited by Fibilou (log)

www.diariesofadomesticatedgoddess.blogspot.com

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Oh how exciting! I'm not familiar with France. So the only idea I have to share is that I once got to do a cake for a guy who popped the question on top of the Eiffel Tower. And he was really really afraid of heights too besides forgetting half his speech. But isn't that cool? Just a question popping thought pour vous.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks so much for everyones help!

The concerns about overdoing it definitely resonate with me - it's always hard to balance the fact that we don't exactly make it to Paris everyday with not overloading our magical week.

I think I will definitely drop one of the meals on Wednesday - any thoughts on which? That would make pretty much only one "major" meal per day which seems more manageable.

I've seen L'Assiette come up and have been very intrigued - with the Tuesday closure, though, though not sure how to work it in without overdoing it. Maybe save it for our anniversary return trip a'la Piglit :laugh: .

Also great point about the picnics - a real bummer since those were some of the highlights of our last trip. Any thoughts on a good way to enjoy some wine, cheese, and charcuterie romantically when it's blustery out?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Since you and your girlfriend are both foodies, I personally agree that one major meal a day (while still ambitious) is manageable, and the kind of "sacrifice" that is worthwhile in situations like yours (or mine) where you don't have the opportunity to vist Paris regularly. Looks like a good itinerary.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I didn't really care much for Reims when I was there in 2006, but I did love the tour of the caves at Pommery...I'm sure Taittinger will be lovely as well.

For a casual dinner, if you decide to stick with French (though I like Mark's idea of something different), I would recommend Camille (you can check out my dinners there over here) - I'm hardly an expert on the Paris dining scene, but my friend Louisa and I just fell in love with this place. Fantastic bistro food, great service, good prices, lovely ambiance.

"We had dry martinis; great wing-shaped glasses of perfumed fire, tangy as the early morning air." - Elaine Dundy, The Dud Avocado

Queenie Takes Manhattan

eG Foodblogs: 2006 - 2007

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks so much for everyones help!

I think I will definitely drop one of the meals on Wednesday - any thoughts on which? That would make pretty much only one "major" meal per day which seems more manageable.

I would definitely drop Chez Denise, I have seen some positive reviews but to me it is very overrated. I went with a friend two years ago and it seemed quite touristy with average food. To me, there are other fun bistros in the same style with much better food.

www.parisnotebook.wordpress.com

Link to comment
Share on other sites

You have an amazing itinerary. I am a glutton but even so would be challenged to follow your dining plans. I agree with Felice that Chez Denise(and also imho, Relais Venise) could be skipped for honeymoon material. Your Sat. in Montmartre could possibly be close to you at Le Café Qui Parle which serves brunch then and the delightful couple are very happy to use their excellent English . I can think of few places more spectacular for the proposal than Les Crayeres in Reims and they will arrange a complimentary tour of the Pommery champagne caves which is just across the street from them.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I have been researching this board and I can't thank all of you enough for the great details and effort that have been put into the content of this board. I find this the most informed and reasonable of all the groups I have found on the web.

My wife and I will be in Paris the last of this month and and the first 2 weeks in Feb. We will be celebrating my 60th birthday and our 39th wedding anniversary which occur during this period. I have put together a list of lunch and dinner possibilities that I will list by arrondisement. We will be staying in the 7th and meeting up with friends who are on St. Louis and near Luxembourg Gardens. They have made arrangements for 2 places that would not have made my list but that's why Baskin Robbins makes so many flavors. Those 2 places are Bofinger and Balzar.

Paris is such an easy city to navigate that I am not concerned about the location of any suggetstios. So here goes:

2nd

Racine

3rd

Le Petit Pamphlet

Cafe des Musees

4th

Coconas

Mon Vieil Ami

5th

Cafe dle la Nouvelle Mairie

6th

Fish la Boissonerie

L'Epi Dupin

Ze Kitchen Gallerie

Cafe de la Mairie

7th

L'Affriole

Chez les Anges

Auguste

any of the Constant group on St Dominique

Le Clos de Gourmet

D'Chez Eaux

Le Gorille Blanc

Le Mapertu

Il VIno

Thoumiuex

Vin Sur Vin

11th

Cartet

Bistro Paul Bert or L'Ecailler du Bistro

Le Temps en Temps

16th

Chez Geraud (lunch while at Marmottan)

Le Relais d'Auteuil

As you can see this is not a list of heavyweights for a big celebration trip. We have been fortunate over the years to dine in most of the ***/**/19-20's. We have found that the serendipity of walking (wandering) in a neighborhood and finding an intimate, relaxing local spot is one of the greatest joys of Paris. A wonderful ripe Quatrehomme cheese; a sandwich mixte; a plat of huitres and a verre du vin in the right circumstances will provide memories that live longer than the content of a menu degustation.

Thank all of you again for the help in my quest and for the joys of vicariously living in france through this board

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I admire your research so far. In the 7th, Les Clos des Gourmets is superb, and Vin sur Vin even better (and more pricey). I would scratch Auguste, Thoumieux and Maupertu, and add Florimond and Leo le Lion. For diversity, you might want to add a few more restaurants that specialize in fish dishes, like Goumard etc. At Balzar, try the steak tartare, and their frites are great. Bofinger makes a good steak au poivre as well.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 Share

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.
×
×
  • Create New...