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Saveur's New Look


Chris Amirault
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I liked it. I went out to get the ingredients for the hopkins county stew. I'm going to make it for dinner. It looks and sounds great.

They needed a new look they have been in a rut for a while

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Ah, it's been way too long since I did a butt. - Susan Fahning aka "snowangel"

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One summers evening drunk to hell, I sat there nearly lifeless…Warren

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Made the stew added a little thyme, bay, parsely and sage, all fresh. This is one kick'n stew my girls loved it!

**************************************************

Ah, it's been way too long since I did a butt. - Susan Fahning aka "snowangel"

--------------------

One summers evening drunk to hell, I sat there nearly lifeless…Warren

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I don't like it. I think a lot of the pages look like those "special advertising sections"...looks cheap. As does the cover. I prefer the old look with the cover photo bordered in white. It looked classier.

And about this issue in particular: only ONE dessert in the entire magazine? And it is ice cream! NO baked goods, unless you categorize blueberry pancakes as such. Not a cake/pie/pastry in sight. And in a fall issue, with cool weather arriving and apples coming into season? For shame!

kit

"I'm bringing pastry back"

Weebl

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I haven't seen this issue yet, but now I'm curious about something:

In perusing the magazine section of the store the other day, I noticed a starkly different quality in a lot of the food magazines I used to read (granted, it's been a while). The paper looks cheaper and more matte in many of them, and I was a bit taken aback. Has high-quality publishing become that cost-prohibitive? (Perhaps the American public is no longer willing to pay the price for glossy, gorgeous pages?)

On the other hand, Donna Hay's magazine (out of Australia) is presented like a quarterly coffee table book. That thing is mouthwatering, and heavy enough to crack peppercorns. Yes, it is mighty expensive, but I would much rather spend my dollars on pages that make me drool.

Thoughts?

Jennifer L. Iannolo

Founder, Editor-in-Chief

The Gilded Fork

Food Philosophy. Sensuality. Sass.

Home of the Culinary Podcast Network

Never trust a woman who doesn't like to eat. She is probably lousy in bed. (attributed to Federico Fellini)

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I haven't seen this issue yet, but now I'm curious about something:

In perusing the magazine section of the store the other day, I noticed a starkly different quality in a lot of the food magazines I used to read (granted, it's been a while).  The paper looks cheaper and more matte in many of them, and I was a bit taken aback.  Has high-quality publishing become that cost-prohibitive? (Perhaps the American public is no longer willing to pay the price for glossy, gorgeous pages?)

On the other hand, Donna Hay's magazine (out of Australia) is presented like a quarterly coffee table book.  That thing is mouthwatering, and heavy enough to crack peppercorns.  Yes, it is mighty expensive, but I would much rather spend my dollars on pages that make me drool.

Thoughts?

Interesting question, Jennifer. I've noticed the same thing. I have no idea as to the realities of the cost of paper and customer spending pattern thing, but have noticed that magazines (and there seem to be a zillion more of them on the racks) seem to be skewing themselves much more either "upscale" or "plain everyday/almost slightly downscale".

Sort of the "I am an everyday person" thing or "I am not just an everyday person". :smile:

But the shininess factor can occur in either the expensive ones or the cheaper ones. There are several expensive ones I can think of (mostly "New Age" or "Intellectual" focused) whose pages are extremely matte but also very thick and lovely.

It would seem that people must be willing to pay for magazines, since so very many are published. But oof! They are becoming expensive. Or maybe it is just that I am getting old and cranky and anything that is not *really* important and fine just seems expensive. :biggrin:

Sorry to wander off answering Jennifer's question, Chris. I hope you will put up with me. I do realize I take some putting up with. :raz:

I have not seen the Saveur. I keep wandering online to read whatever content turns up there, instead. (That actually may be a factor in your assessment of how the new issue has been re-formatted. The younger among us who have grown up being bombarded by a variety of medias, all very visual. . .including the internet. . .may have given some sort of feedback in studies about how the pages looked. . .not "busy" enough to capture their interest or perhaps not in smaller appetizing "bytes"?)

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It would seem that people must be willing to pay for magazines, since so very many are published.

People don't pay for magazines; advertisers pay for magazines. A business or trade journal might get 10% of its revenue from single-copy and subscription sales combined and 90% from advertising (well, a couple of percentage points need to be set aside for other revenue sources -- sale of mailing lists, back-issues, merchandise, etc. -- but those aren't all that significant). For special interest magazines like Saveur, the number is likely to be about 30% from selling magazines and 70% from advertising. It is extremely rare for a magazine to be supported by its subscribers. Cook's Illustrated, Consumer Reports and a few others do manage to publish without advertising and they have that signature low-budget appearance. Whereas some of the nicest magazines out there are free to most or all of their subscribers: Departures, Food Arts, Absolute. So the question isn't really "are people willing to pay for Saveur" but, rather, "are advertisers willing to pay for Saveur." I suspect the answer, increasingly, is no. Rumors of Saveur's demise have been circulating for some time. It would have gone under a couple of years ago but was rescued at the last minute by World Publications. I don't know that it has been profitable since -- it may just be a feather in World Pub's cap for as long as they're willing to lose money on it.

Steven A. Shaw aka "Fat Guy"
Co-founder, Society for Culinary Arts & Letters, sshaw@egstaff.org
Proud signatory to the eG Ethics code
Director, New Media Studies, International Culinary Center (take my food-blogging course)

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So the question isn't really "are people willing to pay for Saveur" but, rather, "are advertisers willing to pay for Saveur." I suspect the answer, increasingly, is no. Rumors of Saveur's demise have been circulating for some time. It would have gone under a couple of years ago but was rescued at the last minute by World Publications. I don't know that it has been profitable since -- it may just be a feather in World Pub's cap for as long as they're willing to lose money on it.

What a shame. It is one of the few that I truly enjoy.

I imagine there is some focused way that the advertisers have traced the usefulness of their advertising in these magazines though. . .to amount of sales generated.

Maybe then, the wave of the future will be to have more online "magazines" that are directly reader-supported rather than advertiser supported. It does cut out that cost factor of "real" manufacture and distribution.

Personally, my direction lately has been to spend money on books or on online journals and avoid the print mags.

Last time I looked at "Vogue" (not that I have much use for it here, and not that it would do me any good anyway :biggrin: having passed the age of twenty five or so ) I had the devil of a time even finding the real articles for the mass of ads. Food mags seem to be angling this direction, too. Aggrevating.

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Damn. I love getting it in the mail. I had no idea it was having difficulties. It's like National Geographic with recipes. My favorite, hands down.

I was a bit thrown off with the new look - but it kept certain traditions, so I'm cool with it. Fonts aren't too far off and pleasant. I'll miss the covers. There's something to be said for the use of blank space - now it looks like a lot of other mags.

"I took the habit of asking Pierre to bring me whatever looks good today and he would bring out the most wonderful things," - bleudauvergne

foodblogs: Dining Downeast I - Dining Downeast II

Portland Food Map.com

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I love Saveur for the writing and the content but lately it seemed a bit tired. For a magazine that embraces the exoticism of a diverse ethnicity and the places off the beaten path, it seemed to be continually turning in the same places. If I have to read one more story about Argentina, India or some rustic spot in France or Italy, I will positively scream.

If any Saveur editor is reading this, there is a whole wide world out there, and good food in those places too.

Ya-Roo Yang aka "Bond Girl"

The Adventures of Bond Girl

I don't ask for much, but whatever you do give me, make it of the highest quality.

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For those who don't already have a subscription, you can get a free digital subscription. You have to download the Zinio software to read it, but it's just like the printed version--including all the ads.  :wink:

I notice it's a six month subscription with no promise of renewal, so I'm not apt to start while my print subscription is running. I see that application for the online edition also requires subscription to some e-mail.

Robert Buxbaum

WorldTable

Recent WorldTable posts include: comments about reporting on Michelin stars in The NY Times, the NJ proposal to ban foie gras, Michael Ruhlman's comments in blogs about the NJ proposal and Bill Buford's New Yorker article on the Food Network.

My mailbox is full. You may contact me via worldtable.com.

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Has anybody heard of the Zinio software, to know if it's reputable in regard to privacy and security, etc.?

They have the standard contract on-line with information as to how everything works in terms of privacy and security.

I let you know if my computer crashes or if anything terrible happens. (I did download the site.) Somehow I am lucky so far with downloads. Not a single virus, and absolutely no spam. I use Mozilla for the most part and have Norton for protection.

Norton. Sounds like some skinny little guy.

But he does the job. :biggrin:

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Has anybody heard of the Zinio software, to know if it's reputable in regard to privacy and security, etc.?

I downloaded it on both computers and have had no problems, viruses, spyware, etc. I also have both hardware and software firewalls, Norton, Ad-aware, Pest Patrol, etc. I'm probably over-protected, but I'd rather be safe than sorry.

Deb

Liberty, MO

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I love Saveur for the writing and the content but lately it seemed a bit tired.  For a magazine that embraces the exoticism of a diverse ethnicity and the places off the beaten path, it seemed to be continually turning in the same places.  If I have to read one more story about Argentina, India or some rustic spot in France or Italy, I will positively scream. 

If any Saveur editor is reading this, there is a whole wide world out there, and good food in those places too.

France, Italy,and Spain seem to be the most heavily featured.

There certainly is plenty of room for more representation from some overlooked(in Saveur) European locales: Netherlands, Belgium, Scandinavia, Switzerland, Germany, Austria, Greece, Eastern Europe.... etc. Very little African cuisine as well.

I still like the magazine though. I almost always enjoy the regional American stuff and just wish there would be more representation of some other areas.

"Under the dusty almond trees, ... stalls were set up which sold banana liquor, rolls, blood puddings, chopped fried meat, meat pies, sausage, yucca breads, crullers, buns, corn breads, puff pastes, longanizas, tripes, coconut nougats, rum toddies, along with all sorts of trifles, gewgaws, trinkets, and knickknacks, and cockfights and lottery tickets."

-- Gabriel Garcia Marquez, 1962 "Big Mama's Funeral"

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I love Saveur for the writing and the content but lately it seemed a bit tired.  For a magazine that embraces the exoticism of a diverse ethnicity and the places off the beaten path, it seemed to be continually turning in the same places.  If I have to read one more story about Argentina, India or some rustic spot in France or Italy, I will positively scream. 

If any Saveur editor is reading this, there is a whole wide world out there, and good food in those places too.

France, Italy,and Spain seem to be the most heavily featured.

There certainly is plenty of room for more representation from some overlooked(in Saveur) European locales: Netherlands, Belgium, Scandinavia, Switzerland, Germany, Austria, Greece, Eastern Europe.... etc. Very little African cuisine as well.

I still like the magazine though. I almost always enjoy the regional American stuff and just wish there would be more representation of some other areas.

Yeah, it's still better than others....although i wish they would discover other parts of Asia that is not India.

Ya-Roo Yang aka "Bond Girl"

The Adventures of Bond Girl

I don't ask for much, but whatever you do give me, make it of the highest quality.

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I thought it was a really disappointing issue, with virtually nothing I want to cook. It's sad, as I've subscribed and enjoyed Saveur for years. I too had no idea it was in trouble, but now that I see this issue, I can see why.

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So my Saveur blues are shared, I see.... Yeah, this new one's not so good, but an issue with an article about the plans for world condiment domination of the founder and owner of Huy Fong Sriracha Sauce ain't all bad!

However, last month's was a real bummer, particularly the cover story, "My Nantucket," by Sarah Lydon, in which we learn what her husband (and ex-NPR host of "The Connection") Christopher Lydon likes to drink in August while vacationing on the Other Island. From the Saveur website blurb:

Things have changed on this storied, fishhook-shaped strip of salt-kissed turf off the coast of Cape Cod, but the time-honored rituals and the vivid flavors of summer still illuminate August here.

If that doesn't scream "boring," I'm not sure what would.... :sad:

Chris Amirault

eG Ethics Signatory

Sir Luscious got gator belts and patty melts

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I like the new format, although I agree that the white-bordered cover was classier. I'm a charter subscriber and it's my favorite food magazine. I hope it doesn't go out of business in the middle of my latest renewal.

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