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Rum Punch


Ed Hamilton
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This post has been moved from the agricole vs industrial thread.

I As i was leaving she gave me a sample of Clarkes Court special!

My wife and I toured the Clarke's Court Rum factory while in Grenada. Not a lot to see but we did sample all of their rums. What we both like the most was there rum punch. Straight out of the bottle with some ice it's a real butt kicker but sooooooo good. Much smoother than say Jack Iron. If you drink a glass of Jack Iron you'll never have to prove your valor in any other way with me.....lol.

Needless to say we purchased a bottle and just recently finished it off. Next January we will be passing through Grenada again and this time will pick up up several bottles. Been trying ever since last January to find a place to buy it here in the states but so far to no avail..... :biggrin:

Rum Punch bottled in the islands is very different from those bottled concoctions you'll find on the shelves in most of the rest of the world. Made with fresh fruit, as opposed to fruit flavorings, rum punch in the islands lacks the shelf life which is part of the reason that is so hard to find these punches outside the islands.

A few years ago, Cockspur exported another wonderful rum punch from Barbados but supplies were cut off after the problems of a short shelf life caused quality control problems. Since these rum punches typically contain only about 25% alcohol, and fresh fruit is not stable under those conditions, it is very difficlut to control the time it takes to ship, warehouse, sell and deliver these alcoholic confections.

I recently got word that Cockspur Rum Punch is coming back to the states, so keep your eyes open.

Edward Hamilton

Ministry of Rum.com

The Complete Guide to Rum

When I dream up a better job, I'll take it.

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  • 1 month later...

One of my favorite punch flavors is hibiscus flowers (aka. Jamaica, Sorrel, Karkade, Roselle...).

I recently picked some up at a local Mexican Grocery to experiment with.

I've found some recipes on the internet for what is probably a very red rum "Sorrel" punch allegedly from Jamaica and spiced with Ginger, Allspice, and Cinnamon.

Anyone have a tested recipe to share? Or other interesting cocktails for this delicious tropical beverage?

I'd also be interested in what anyone considers an accurate recipe for Planter's Punch. It's something I sometimes enjoy; but, I have never been able to find two recipes that agree.

Edited by eje (log)

---

Erik Ellestad

If the ocean was whiskey and I was a duck...

Bernal Heights, SF, CA

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Various Rum Punches were very popular in 18th to early 19th C Scotland, especially at the various 'Hellfire' type clubs, but also at les aggressively decadent places.

This recipe is from a book published in the early 19th C, it is very nice, although I have never been able to work out what type of Rum was actually used in these recipes. Most I use Mt Gay, as I like this rum.

gallery_1643_1586_192904.jpg

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The variety of planter's punch recipes that reflect the diversity of the islands. A common thread is that they contain fruit juice, a couple of kinds of rum, generally white and dark on top, and some freshly ground spice and a fruit slice as a garnish.

Edward Hamilton

Ministry of Rum.com

The Complete Guide to Rum

When I dream up a better job, I'll take it.

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I was recently lucky enough to 'score ' a bottle of Ma Doudou rum punch from St. Martin. Fruit juice, vanilla, banana, rum, and sugar syrup are the ingredients. It is bottled at 30 % Vol. and was fantastic. I'll be in St. Martin in Nov. and will definetly be bringing some more of this stuff home. I wonder if they make any other flavors ...Ed ?

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Another oldish Rum drink, this time from 19th century Anglo-Indian Calcutta.

The drink is called a "Flash" and is equal parts rum mixed with lemon ice and then topped off with ginger beer. You are advised to drink it while it fizzes, hence the 'flash' I guess.

Lemon Ice as in lemon Sorbet ? Sounds great (for when the weather improves though).

Gethin

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  • 2 months later...
  • 3 months later...

Dear All,

Are there any recommended recommendations (sic) for Planters Punch that the world is missing out on?

Are there any truly exceptional concoctions that go under the name Planters Punch?

Also, is a drink such as follows, able to called itself a Planters Punch?

2 shots Myers Rum,

1 shot Fresh Lime Juice,

1/2 shot Grenadine Syrup,

2 dashes of Angostura Bitters,

Top with Sodawater.

Is this a planters punch?

What is the Myers Rum Planters Punch Recipe? the one on the bottle, if you please!-)

Cheers!

George

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I thought I had an old bottle of Meyer's around but it's gone. I don't think the bottles now say anything about Planter's punch.

Theres' a poem often listed for a punch recipe:

One of Sour, Two of Sweet, Three of Strong, And Four of Weak with the explanation given as such: Sour (lime juice), Sweet (simple syrup), Strong (rum) and Weak (water), so your sodawater would certainly qualify. The recipe that went with the poem was:

3 oz lime juice

6 oz simple syrup

9 oz rum

12 oz water

grated nutmeg

a few dashes of Angostura bitters

Other recipes use orange and pineapple juice instead of water or soda water.

Thanks,

Kevin

gallery_28473_2923_39610.jpeg

DarkSide Member #005-03-07-06

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I thought I had an old bottle of Meyer's around but it's gone.  I don't think the bottles now say anything about Planter's punch.

Theres' a poem often listed for a punch recipe:

One of Sour,  Two of Sweet,  Three of Strong,  And Four of Weak  with the explanation given as such: Sour (lime juice), Sweet (simple syrup), Strong (rum) and Weak (water),  so your sodawater would certainly qualify.  The recipe that went with the poem was:

3 oz lime juice

6 oz simple syrup

9 oz rum

12 oz water

grated nutmeg

a few dashes of Angostura bitters

Other recipes use orange and pineapple juice instead of water or soda water.

Thanks,

Kevin

gallery_28473_2923_39610.jpeg

The 1-2-3-4 recipe is the recipe from Bajan/Barbadian Rum Punch. It is in my Barbadian cookbook (and the website below). Just lime juice, water, sweetener, and rum. Nothing more except bitters or nutmeg.

http://barbados.org/recipies/rumpunch.htm

Now other rum punches have other tropical fruit juices (pineapple, mango, orange, etc.).

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There are a lot of punch recipes in Cassell’s Dictionary of Cookery (circa 1870’s)

Under the heading “Punch” there are recipes for:

A la Francaise (2 variations); à la Régence; à la Reine; à la Romaine, iced; à la Victoria; also Punch, Burnt; Punch, English; Punch for Hot Weather; Punch, Glasgow; Punch, Hot (2 variations); Punch in Haste; Punch, Milk; Punch, Poney; Punch, Whiskey.

Given separately under their respective headings are: Cambridge, Milk; George the Fourth; Gin; Granito (Iced); Harrowgate; Iced; Imperial; Milk; Norfolk; Orange; Oxford; Pine Apple; Regent’s; Roman, Iced; Royal; Sherbert for; Shrub (several recipes); Shrub Rum; Usquebach; Verder of Milk; Wine; Yorkshire.

Also there are recipes for Punch icing, jelly, drops (boiled candy), and sauce for sweet puddings.

If any of these are of interest, I will email them or post them here.

Happy Feasting

Janet (a.k.a The Old Foodie)

My Blog "The Old Foodie" gives you a short food history story each weekday day, always with a historic recipe, and sometimes a historic menu.

My email address is: theoldfoodie@fastmail.fm

Anything is bearable if you can make a story out of it. N. Scott Momaday

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Can anyone give me a definitive recipe for a Petit Punch? if so, what is it?

Cheers!

George

Squeeze two lime wedges into a small rocks glass

Add 2 bar spoons of sugar syrup. (If you can find La Mauny or Clemente cane syrup its even better.)

1 measure of white rhum agricole

stir until sugar dissolves, and sip. (HMMMM)

Traditionally ice is not used for the "TI PUNCH" but as most classic cocktails evolve through time the recipe changes.

When I read about the evils of drinking rum...I stopped reading...because life is too short, so smile and enjoy yourself...

therumman@btinternet.com

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  • 2 weeks later...
As for the weak in a rum punch, I would never add 4 parts water. Fresh juice would be fine, but not water.

For the sake of tradition, I add water at times as the original recipe calls. However, I've been experimenting with juice since the rum punch I had in Barbados didn't have strictly water as a "weak" ingredient in it and I like a varied taste. I've yet to get to a juice combination that tastes exactly like what they served in Barbados.

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Thanks Sam. The good news is that Petite Canne Sugar Cane Syrup is now available in a few markets in the US. In the islands, the ti punch is my favorite drink. In the US, I've been exposed to a number of great cocktails by bartenders across the country. But I still go back to a ti punch for the first drink of the day.

Edward Hamilton

Ministry of Rum.com

The Complete Guide to Rum

When I dream up a better job, I'll take it.

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Ed,

I am totally untrained but vacations in some B islands have allowed me to experiment with draft rums. I do generally follow the 1-2-3-4 formula but frequently forget the last.

1. Sour - Generally whatever fruit juice is freshest at the street vendors.

2. Sweet - I am partial to Falernum (Hanschell's is fabulous) or something local. In Spanish Town, VI I used sea moss, it was wonderful.

3. Strong - Preferreble a mix of two dark draft rums of questionable heritage.

4. Neat - Not being very neat, I usually add the local ginger beer (street vendor's best) to taste. That might be an ounce if the ice is good. Fruit Juice will substitute if the sour and sweet balance are not compromized.

This brings back wonderful memories. Where can I get some fresh passion fruit?

Tim

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  • 7 months later...

Rum Punch bottled in the islands is very different from those bottled concoctions you'll find on the shelves in most of the rest of the world. Made with fresh fruit, as opposed to fruit flavorings, rum punch in the islands lacks the shelf life which is part of the reason that is so hard to find these punches outside the islands.

A few years ago, Cockspur exported another wonderful rum punch from Barbados but supplies were cut off after the problems of a short shelf life caused quality control problems. Since these rum punches typically contain only about 25% alcohol, and fresh fruit is not stable under those conditions, it is very difficlut to control the time it takes to ship, warehouse, sell and deliver these alcoholic confections.

I recently got word that Cockspur Rum Punch is coming back to the states, so keep your eyes open.

I was recently lucky enough to 'score ' a bottle of Ma Doudou rum punch from St. Martin. Fruit juice, vanilla, banana, rum, and sugar syrup are the ingredients. It is bottled at 30 % Vol. and was fantastic.

While down in St. Martin eating lunch at an outdoor restaurant/beach hut (I believe it’s called Waikiki La Plage at Orient Bay), a bottle of rum punch was placed on the table. I recall it tasting slightly strong (could have been the lack of ice) with a hint of fruit and spice (nutmeg, but the bride thinks cinnamon). Unfortunately my recollection is VERY cloudy as we managed to polish off the bottle and I can’t recall the label.

But what I can remember has me thinking how pleasant it would be to concoct my own bottled rum punch/cocktail this summer for sipping outdoors around the patio.

So, does anyone have a recipe that would approximate the ingredients in a bottled rum punch from “the islands”? Or maybe you have a recipe for a rum punch that may work well as a bottled cocktail?

I did find this eGullet link with info from Gary Regan on bottled cocktails and this informative piece over at BarMixMaster.com

Thanks in advance, Rich

"The only time I ever said no to a drink was when I misunderstood the question."

Will Sinclair

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