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Le Cordon Bleu Paris- January 2006


lesanglierrouge
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  • 4 weeks later...

Thanks for your reply and an entertaining read. I'll try really hard not to put plastic containers of mustard on hot stoves while at LCB. When are you returning to Paris?

Also have you decided what to do in with your internship? I think I would actually like to do mine a little outside of the resto biz (I have my whole life for that). I think it would be really cool to do that in charcuterie in Italy and/or Corsica. Do you know what kind of parameters LCB has for internships?

Edited by lesanglierrouge (log)
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I am currently in Paris now, and will be until the end of the program May 2006.

As for an internship, I'm not exactly sure how it works. I believe you get more information about that when you enter into the Superior classes.

I don't know of any internships offered outside of restaurant kitchens. From what I have heard, you work with the LCB chefs and talk about what you're interested in. They have contacts with many of the large restaurants, but outside of that, their contacts might be slightly limited. You might be on your own there.

Since you need government papers to work in France (carte sejour), I assume LCB can only help with internships in France or in countries where the schools are located. I think I remember reading somewhere that some people have staged in London.

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Officially Cordon Bleu Paris will help place you in a professional kitchen in France - restaurant, hotel, catering, pastisserie, boulangerie, chocolaterie, etc. If you want to do something like charcuterie in Italy and/or Corsica - which I think is great - then talk to your chefs privately. Good luck.

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