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Pork sausage in Kosher-themed Noahs Bagels


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Where's Fish when you need him?? I'm sure he'd love to jump on this bandwagon. :laugh:

Most women don't seem to know how much flour to use so it gets so thick you have to chop it off the plate with a knife and it tastes like wallpaper paste....Just why cream sauce is bitched up so often is an all-time mytery to me, because it's so easy to make and can be used as the basis for such a variety of really delicious food.

- Victor Bergeron, Trader Vic's Book of Food & Drink, 1946

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Looking at the corporate website, the only thing identified these days as kosher are the beef franks. They also have bacon on the menu - sandwiches and breakfast items. And it Aidell's sausages. Not bad.

Probably neither insensitive nor ignorant, just corporate.

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They have a bit of a Yiddish shtick in their marketing-speak, but I don't think they claim to be Kosher.

I remember making homemade bagels and bringing them to a group of people I was working with at the Japan Center of my university in Germany. I had given advance notice so people could bring their own toppings. My professor said, "I heard that one can eat these with ham..."

I said, "well, that's certainly possible, but it would be inconsistent with custom, since these are associated with Jewish immigrants from Eastern Europe and Russia in the U.S., and they don't tend to eat a lot of ham..."

He ate his with ham.

Jason Truesdell

Blog: Pursuing My Passions

Take me to your ryokan, please

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I dunno. Certainly there is a Jewish connection with Bagels in the Ashkenaze tradition, but Kosherness and Bagels are mutually exclusive unless you are at a Kosher bagel shop (or more specifically, an "Appetizing Store") in a orthodox Jewish neighborhood.

I like my breakfast bagel sandwiches with Taylor Pork Roll, with a little bit of salt, pepper and ketchup myself.

Jason Perlow

Co-Founder, The Society for Culinary Arts & Letters

offthebroiler.com - Food Blog | View my food photos on Instagram

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Noahs Bagels are offensive. Boy did they change over the years. Not a bagel anymore. Yuck. :sad:

Bruce Frigard

Quality control Taster, Château D'Eau Winery

"Free time is the engine of ingenuity, creativity and innovation"

111,111,111 x 111,111,111 = 12,345,678,987,654,321

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I know I've seen signs in Noah's Bagels asking that you don't bring in outside food because they are kosher. This was awhile ago, and perhaps only at the couple of locations that I used to go to, but it was definitely a rule.

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It sounds like part of their shtick more than anything else... "It's not Kosher to bring in outside food." Really?

I can't think of a way that a shop that serves sandwiches with both cream cheese and meat on the same bagel could be Kosher, anyway. Though I don't have any cultural authority, I don't think you can be fleischig and milchig on the same bagel :P

I know I've seen signs in Noah's Bagels asking that you don't bring in outside food because they are kosher. This was awhile ago, and perhaps only at the couple of locations that I used to go to, but it was definitely a rule.

Jason Truesdell

Blog: Pursuing My Passions

Take me to your ryokan, please

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The one at U.Village is kosher in the traditional sense of the word. No meat products are sold, and they do have the sign Dandelion mentions.

Edited to add: the SF Bay Area stores have sold the BagelDogs for at least the last few months. Here they're kosher beef hot-dogs and (beef) Polish sausages, or Aidell's sausages: Chicken-Portobello, Cajun Andouille (pork), and Artichoke/Garlic (chicken/beef). They also sell a number of panini and some hot and cold sandwiches.

And yeah, their bagels aren't very bagel-y. But if you think of them as spherical bread, they're not half bad. :raz:

Edited by ScorchedPalate (log)

Anita Crotty travel writer & mexican-food addictwww.marriedwithdinner.com

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