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"Cake Bible" by Rose Levy Beranbaum


freddurf
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You can add your streusel after your cake has risen but before it's done..........that may solve the sunken problem.

I just wanted to make sure this is clear...........I've experienced this colapsing with other authors recipes, it's definately not something that happens with Roses' recipes only.

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I made the raspberry chocolate oblivion truffle torte for my kid's birthday. I posted about it in the desert thread (sniff sniff I wish I could post there more often  :laugh: ) but I think I need to post here too.

Deborah, you are my inspiration for trying this. THANK YOU!!!

Well, what goes around comes around, lady! Since I never would have gotten through that Oblivion wedding cake in the first place without your help and encouragement. I am so glad you liked it! :biggrin:

Agenda-free since 1966.

Foodblog: Power, Convection and Lies

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I made the sour cream coffee cake for the second time yesterday, and I have a question.  Both times I've tried the cake, the cake batter has sort of swelled through the layer of streusel on top, swamping it.  After baking, the layer of streusel has ended up mostly under the surface both times.  The cake has still tasted great, but I haven't achieved the attractive crunchy layer on top. 

Anyone know why?  What am i doing wrong?  I'm following Rose's directions to the letter.

Hmm, I used to make these ginormous yeasted kuchens in what would be like a double full sheet pan size, a little deeper though. When I put apple slices & streusel they most always sunk. When I let it proof too much the struesel topping alone sunk too. Of course yours is not yeasted.

Drizzling glaze covers up the sink holes :biggrin:

But my real suggestion is to perhaps bake it in a bundt type pan maybe. Rose herself suggests using magic strips did you try that??? The object of the game is to get it rising evenly (duh, Kate :). The hole in the middle of the bundt pan will help that some.

The magic strips will definitely help it bake more even in the springform pan. I would fold a piece of folded alminum foil Like the one in post 18 the third picture down. It is real easy to remove and just pat the streusel around to cover up the hole--take it out right when it comes out of the oven--the steam fills up the hole. Just slide a knife down each side to unfold the leg. Poof comes right out.

Umm, spreading the batter from the middle out towards the sides of the pan a bit will also help--y'know heap it up a bit around the edges, then put on the streusel. But the magic strips & aluminum foil thingy will help a lot I'll bet.

Just some possible ideas for you. I haven't thought about those massive kuchens in forever. They smelled so good!

PS. Thank you, Deborah!

Edited by K8memphis (log)
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I made the sour cream coffee cake for the second time yesterday, and I have a question.  Both times I've tried the cake, the cake batter has sort of swelled through the layer of streusel on top, swamping it.  After baking, the layer of streusel has ended up mostly under the surface both times.  The cake has still tasted great, but I haven't achieved the attractive crunchy layer on top. 

Anyone know why?  What am i doing wrong?  I'm following Rose's directions to the letter.

This might not be helpful since I have not made the Cake Bible way (I use Nick Malgieri's recipe)but I just looked over the recipes and they are pretty similar (his uses whole eggs and a little more sour cream, and the streusel is simpler). The only difference I can think of is kind of dumb--I have alwlays made this cake in a TUBE. That means quicker rising all around and perhaps the streusel somehow doesn't have a chance to sink. (Gees, and I took college chem and don't know what I'm talking about.) But maybe try it next time. I've never contemplated making this cake in a springform. It is one of my most popular cakes also.

edited for typo

Edited by TurtleMeng (log)
"Mom, why can't you cook like the iron chef?"
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  • 1 year later...

I also tried the SOUR CREAM COFFEE CAKE and was utterly dismayed to find half the cake batter to be way undercooked while the outer layer, including the streusel was golden!

I baked it for 55 minutes, if I'm not mistaken and even tested the batter. I might not have noticed the yellowish batter against the pale wooden skewer I used as tester...

Is this a case of an oven that's too hot?

Flavor was just wonderful with the peaches and walnuts and cinnamon and butter combo... :)

I am in the process of fulfilling a dream, one that involves a huge stainless kitchen, heavenly desserts and lots of happy sweet-toothed people.
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Has also anyone here tried baking the recipes without converting the recipe amounts to 1 & 1/3 for 2 layers? I don't like doing much math...Hehe.

Also, I will be trying the WHITE VELVET BUTTER CAKE next as I now have a surplus of 4 egg whites from the 4 egg yolks I used for the sour cream coffee cake.

I am in the process of fulfilling a dream, one that involves a huge stainless kitchen, heavenly desserts and lots of happy sweet-toothed people.
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  • 2 weeks later...
Holy crap, (oops) sounds like I need to get this book. But how to get it in the UK? The bookstores here are so lacking in good pastry books. Oh how I miss Chapters (CAN) and Borders....

our local borders (in edinburgh) have a copy in stock and will order almost anything (except martha stewart :wacko: ) they also have a bunch of other US titles.

when ordering go prepared with isbn and persist when they say they dont see it on the system, tell them it's from the states and have them search their order in screen.

Spam in my pantry at home.

Think of expiration, better read the label now.

Spam breakfast, dinner or lunch.

Think about how it's been pre-cooked, wonder if I'll just eat it cold.

wierd al ~ spam

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  • 8 years later...

I looked through this old thread for some mention of Rose Levy Beranbaum's Praline Brioche Cake but did not find any.  If anyone has made this cake, I would appreciate suggestions about the brioche part.  Although the finished cake is delicious and always looks more or less OK, I have never had complete success with the brioche.  Whether I bake it as she directs as a single layer in a springform pan or in two cake pans, it always rises, tests done, then after being removed from the oven, falls.  Inevitably I have to trim it rather severely to get a nice cylinder that can be frosted.

 

In the most recent effort with this cake, it was on an unexpectedly warm day and the brioche rose more than the double that Rose mentions.  For the second rise just before baking, the brioche rose just as it was supposed to, and during the baking it rose and browned beautifully, tested done with a skewer, then promptly fell into a mess on the counter--a great sinkhole in the middle.  I was able to rescue it by trimming the edges (and by cheating a little with extra frosting here and there).  Could the first over-rise have been the issue?  This cake is so good that it is worth trying to solve the problem.  By the way, I have altered it a bit by either slicing a single layer in two or using two layers and then spreading some apricot jam--a great combination with the hazelnut buttercream and toasted hazelnuts around the outside.

 

Any brioche help would be appreciated.

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