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eG Foodblog: Mooshmouse - Back-to-school Dining on the Left Coast


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Yes, I'm an insomniac. A bona fide insomniac. Everyone always claimed that my sleeping habits would change once I had children, but that certainly hasn't been the case. Fortunately, Ian is a night owl too, and Noah is already showing signs of being a late sleeper/late riser.

So THIS is what you've been saving up for!  I was just about to send a PM asking where you were...missed your posts. 

Really looking forward to this week .... :smile:

A summer hiatus of sorts. Just out and about with Ian and Noah, making the most of Vancouver in the sunshine and spending lots of lazy time at our cabin on Salt Spring Island before the summer slips away. But I'ze back now! :biggrin:

I really do miss Vancouver. It's so nice to see pics from there. Which area are you in?

Joie, you say:
I'll certainly miss this garden when we move.

Is a move in the works? To where?

We live in the Commercial Drive area of East Vancouver... The Drive as it's affectionately called. Once known as "Little Italy" for its plethora of Italian shops, cafes and restaurants, The Drive has evolved into a more ethnically diverse neighbourhood with African, Asian, European, Latin American and East-Indian influences being added to the mix. Its tree-lined residential streets are dotted with character homes, many of which have been lovingly restored.

Oddly enough, we're moving only 8 blocks south of where we live now, into a 1950s-vintage two-storey bungalow that's 1/2 a block from a park. It's a relaxed, family-oriented neighbourhood that's perfect for preschooler hijinks and walking distance from some of Vancouver's best ethnic eats.

Back to food...how much of this stuff will you be able to harvest when you move?  Maybe you could tell the present owners you're weeding?  :biggrin:

Thankfully, all of it. Even if our friends decide to re-rent this house after we leave instead of returning from their travels abroad, there'll be no problem with us reaping the fruits of our labour. :smile:

Joie Alvaro Kent

"I like rice. Rice is great if you're hungry and want 2,000 of something." ~ Mitch Hedberg

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As you'll soon discover, my son is a bottomless pit. Noah always asks for a snack on the drive home from preschool despite the fact that he's just demolished a snack with the rest of his classmates an hour before I pick him up.

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Today's munchies were some dried cranberries and a Granny Smith apple. Well, half an apple; I ate the other half.

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When I arrived, Noah was busily inspecting a tray of fruits and vegetables (I gather that the plastic wrap keeps the fruit flies at bay). Coincidentally, the science topic for his first week back at school is the Food Pyramid and making smart food choices.

True to form, Noah made a beeline for the tomato patch as soon as he changed out of his school uniform.

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I've hit the jackpot... tomato heaven!

With that, I bid you good night. Sweet tomato dreams.

Joie Alvaro Kent

"I like rice. Rice is great if you're hungry and want 2,000 of something." ~ Mitch Hedberg

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From one insomniac to another, this is a really cute blog so far. :wub:

I'll try to check in tomorrow (um, later today? that sounds so wrong) after my first day of teaching in the new semester.

Michael aka "Pan"

 

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Wow, Jamie, that's quite an impressive litany... and you've managed to list a few of my favourites.  Your knowledge of Filipino cuisine is a pleasant surprise; as Soba will readily attest, Filipino food isn't that widely known in North America.

It's not widely known this side of the Atlantic either, so I'll be very interested to learn more. I was in Manilla for a few days about 15 years ago, but didn't have enough time to get a real sense of the food. Good luck with your busy schedule!

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Your cat reminds me of my cat. Last weighed in at 23lbs!!!!

He is not fat. Just big. His paws at six weeks old were as big as my palm (Hand).

So glad to see another Vancouverite blogging!! Have at it Moosh! We know you are capable of representing us well!

Noah looks well on his way to becoming your best bud in food appreciation! :biggrin:

edited for spelling....

Edited by Irishgirl (log)
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Thanks for the kolachy pic. Heard about the shop from another eG's visit but had no idea what they were. Is this a "dish" of a specific ethnic origin or a Chef Fowke and ktbear creation?

Good to see young'uns like Noah appreciating good food. Way'ta'go, Mummy. :biggrin:

Dejah

www.hillmanweb.com

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This is what happens when a night-owl blogs. Lots of stuff when you wake up, but not much again until the evening. What gives Moosh? Hopefully you're busy harvesting those eggplants for Noah's lunch. "J" wants to know how the harvest has been on the tomatoes ... we've been away so it's been kinda tough keeping up.

Looking forward to your tour of Vancouver. Sorry we won't be there for Aurora or for any Lunch-Mafia gatherings :sad: .

A.

ps The cat's name should be "Ringo-Snack" :raz:

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Thanks for the kolachy pic. Heard about the shop from another eG's visit but had no idea what they were. Is this a "dish" of a specific ethnic origin or a Chef Fowke and ktbear creation?

Kolache are Czech in origin, Mr. Rehovot (Czech) advises (it means "cake" in Czech). One town in Texas, founded by Czech immigrants, has a festival devoted to these sweet- or savory-filled thingamabobs.

Adorable blog! More, please! :smile:

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curry manok iban talum

Fascinating. Not knowing any Tagalog, I am surpised that I recognize three words out of four in that name.

Manok means chicken in the Iban language. Now, what does "Iban" mean in Tagalog? I guess the Phillipines are closer to Borneo than I'd thought. It will be interesting to find out what culinary links exist between the two places.

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This is what happens when a night-owl blogs.  Lots of stuff when you wake up, but not much again until the evening...  "J" wants to know how the harvest has been on the tomatoes ... we've been away so it's been kinda tough keeping up. 

Looking forward to your tour of Vancouver.  Sorry we won't be there for Aurora or for any Lunch-Mafia gatherings :sad:

Likewise Arne... you've been missed 'round these here parts. The tomato harvest has been bountiful to say the least; Noah and I have been mowing through them like wildfire. And night-owl, schmight-owl... stay-at-home Moms have busy days too! :wink:

On Tuesdays and Thursdays, Ian usually heads over to the new house for a renovating stint... which means Date Night for Noah and Mom. :wub:

Last night's date was a book reconnaissance mission to the Vancouver Public Library's central downtown branch.

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Of course, what date would be complete without dinner out on the town?

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A good dose of comfort food was in order, and our stomachs demanded ramen from this little noodle joint across the street from the library.

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Noah and I shared this massive bowl of Shoyu Ramen; somehow, we managed to escape relatively splash-free. Hidden away in there are bamboo shoots, corn, bean sprouts, green onions and sliced pork.

Fellow eGulleter *Deborah* joined us for the noodle slurpfest. Here's her bowl of Char Siu Ramen with shoyu broth... much more photogenic than ours.

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And there's always room for gyoza.

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I'm off to the races yet again. Back after lunch with photos of breakfast and some much anticipated Filipino food.

Joie Alvaro Kent

"I like rice. Rice is great if you're hungry and want 2,000 of something." ~ Mitch Hedberg

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Well, now! I just wandered over to Soba's thread on Filipino food and see I've been missing out on a lot! My eye snagged my taste buds at the mention of tamarind....oh, tamarind, how I love thee....but the rest looks good too. I'll have to read that thread in more depth later. Meanwhile, Moosh, I'm looking forward to any of your Filipino cooking but I'd be especially grateful to learn a new use for tamarind! :wub: Please?

Nancy Smith, aka "Smithy"
HosteG Forumsnsmith@egstaff.org

"Every day should be filled with something delicious, because life is too short not to spoil yourself. " -- Ling (with permission)

"There comes a time in every project when you have to shoot the engineer and start production." -- author unknown

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While Ian the Grill Master works his magic on the barbecue, I thought I'd steal a minute or two and catch up on today's meals.

Here's this morning's view down our street as Noah and I joined the rest of humanity on our 15-minute commute to preschool.

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Once the Mommy school bus had delivered its one and only passenger, I headed straight to Seb's Market Café for breakfast with fellow eGulleter Vancouver Lee.

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It's a neighbourhood restaurant about 10 minutes from our house named after the young son of Chef/Owner François Godbout. Seb's features live jazz on Fridays and Saturdays and it's one of our favourite family hangouts for weekend brunch. Comfortable, relaxed, a great stash of toys and colouring gear... it gets Noah's seal of approval.

There are four things for which I have developed an even deeper appreciation since becoming a Mom: wine, beer, chocolate and coffee... not necessarily in order of preference. First thing in the morning, I'll gladly settle for one out of four.

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That's a cappuccino in case you're wondering. And now for breakfast.

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Vancouver Lee ordered a Ham Scramble with home fries, rye toast and orange marmalade. All of the breads and preserves at Seb's are made in house.

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I had a Roasted Garlic and Shiitake Mushroom Omelette with home fries, rye toast and apple butter... a welcome break from my usual breakfast routine of coffee, coffee and coffee.

After a relaxing breakfast, it was nice to see that life's pace had slowed considerably in our neighbourhood once I got back home.

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Dinner's now on the table, so I've gotta run. In my absence, here's a teaser or two from lunchtime.

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Up next: a few thoughts on Filipino eating habits, or "Cultural Justification For Eating 6 Times A Day."

:wink:

Joie Alvaro Kent

"I like rice. Rice is great if you're hungry and want 2,000 of something." ~ Mitch Hedberg

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Last night's date was a book reconnaissance mission to the Vancouver Public Library's central downtown branch.

gallery_28661_3_46552.jpggallery_28661_3_23022.jpg

Moosh, I didn't know you lived on Cylon Occupied Caprica. Isn't the sky supposed to be red?

Jason Perlow

Co-Founder, The Society for Culinary Arts & Letters

offthebroiler.com - Food Blog | View my food photos on Instagram

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Thanks for the kolachy pic. Heard about the shop from another eG's visit but had no idea what they were. Is this a "dish" of a specific ethnic origin or a Chef Fowke and ktbear creation?

Here on Minnesota's Iron Range many people are descended from immigrants of various Eastern European countries and most have some version of the "Kolachy".

Two local bakerys I frequent make them. One uses a softer dough, almost like a Danish, and the other makes them more like a short pie crust. Apricot and prune are the standards, and cream cheese, often with a dollup of raspberry or strawbery jam is popular.

I'd never heard of savory fillings in Kolachy, but I'll mention it to the bakers.

SB (has them twice a week)(at least) :raz:

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Last night's date was a book reconnaissance mission to the Vancouver Public Library's central downtown branch.

gallery_28661_3_46552.jpggallery_28661_3_23022.jpg

Moosh, I didn't know you lived on Cylon Occupied Caprica. Isn't the sky supposed to be red?

"Joie" [Moosh]

After that response may I have your permission to give "Jason" a "Beloute" as a gift from the Phillipines when I next visit New Jersey ? I'm sure that it will help him to appreciate adjust the color of the NW Sky. It always brings a man back down to earth.

Irwin :wub::biggrin:

I don't say that I do. But don't let it get around that I don't.

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I've never heard of Kolachy - but it looks YUM! What do they do with the insides of the bread?

Thanks for the kolachy pic. Heard about the shop from another eG's visit but had no idea what they were. Is this a "dish" of a specific ethnic origin or a Chef Fowke and ktbear creation?

Kolache are Czech in origin, Mr. Rehovot (Czech) advises (it means "cake" in Czech). One town in Texas, founded by Czech immigrants, has a festival devoted to these sweet- or savory-filled thingamabobs.

Here on Minnesota's Iron Range many people are descended from immigrants of various Eastern European countries and most have some version of the "Kolachy".

Two local bakerys I frequent make them. One uses a softer dough, almost like a Danish, and the other makes them more like a short pie crust.  Apricot and prune are the standards, and cream cheese, often with a dollup of raspberry or strawbery jam is popular. 

I'd never heard of savory fillings in Kolachy, but I'll mention it to the bakers.

SB (has them twice a week)(at least) :raz:

Rehovot and srhcb, thanks for pinch-hitting on the kolachy factoids. They are, indeed, Czech in origin; there's also a Polish version of them. Traditionally speaking, kolachy are made from a sweet dough and filled with nuts, cottage cheese or fruit preserves. Apricot and poppy seed are common variants.

srhcb, what are your favourite flavours?

Joie Alvaro Kent

"I like rice. Rice is great if you're hungry and want 2,000 of something." ~ Mitch Hedberg

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Last night's date was a book reconnaissance mission to the Vancouver Public Library's central downtown branch.

gallery_28661_3_46552.jpggallery_28661_3_23022.jpg

Moosh, I didn't know you lived on Cylon Occupied Caprica. Isn't the sky supposed to be red?

I had to drag my husband away from what he was doing to read this post. He laughed a lot. He keeps telling me that I have to watch the new Battlestar Galactica.

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Moosh, I didn't know you lived on Cylon Occupied Caprica. Isn't the sky supposed to be red?

:laugh::laugh::laugh:

Hey now... back in the day, I loved me my Kent McCord! :wub:

Admittedly, I absolutely loathed Moshe Safdie's concept for the VPL's downtown branch when it won the international design competition. Over the years, however, it's kind of grown on me. Like fungus. Hey, if it's good enough for Arnold (The Sixth Day filmed a few scenes there), I suppose it's good enough for me.

"Joie" [Moosh]

After that response may I have your permission to give "Jason" a "Beloute" as a gift from the Phillipines when I next visit New Jersey ? I'm sure that it will help him to appreciate adjust the color of the NW Sky. It always brings a man back down to earth.

Irwin :wub:  :biggrin:

Irwin, you hit it right on the head. Eating balut is a sure-fire way to change anyone's reality. :blink::wink:

Joie Alvaro Kent

"I like rice. Rice is great if you're hungry and want 2,000 of something." ~ Mitch Hedberg

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Beautiful photos of your striking library and mouth-watering breakfast!

I am really enjoying the blog!  The photos are making me really homesick :rolleyes:

Thanks! :biggrin:

easternsun, how long has it been since you lived in Vancouver?

Joie Alvaro Kent

"I like rice. Rice is great if you're hungry and want 2,000 of something." ~ Mitch Hedberg

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Hey Moosh,

Lovin' the blog. Love your li'l area of our fair (fare?)

city as well. I know of a few actors who live in your 'hood.

Apparently it's still big with artsy types.

Would love also to hear recommendations of some Filipino

restaurants. Not a cuisine I'm really familiar with either.

I think, like lotsa other cuisines, it's better cooked at home?

Having been born and raised here (with a one-year stint on

Saltspring but, alas, as a mere babe), I can't ever recall

seeing a Filipino restaurant in Vancouver.

As for your feline, I think you should keep Shadow, since, with

his bulk, he casts shadows on everything/one he passes?

What do you feed that thing???!

Cheers!

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Beautiful photos of your striking library and mouth-watering breakfast!

I am really enjoying the blog!  The photos are making me really homesick :rolleyes:

Thanks! :biggrin:

easternsun, how long has it been since you lived in Vancouver?

I was born and raised in Vangroovy. I left eight years ago to live in Japan and I usually get home once a year - last year I spent six months in India and this year I paid for my Dad to come over for two weeks. I am already counting down to next summer :wacko: when I can indulge in the comforts of home again.

Any chance you will be strolling over from The Drive for GELATI?

"Thy food shall be thy medicine" -Hippocrates

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curry manok iban talum

Fascinating. Not knowing any Tagalog, I am surpised that I recognize three words out of four in that name.

Manok means chicken in the Iban language. Now, what does "Iban" mean in Tagalog? I guess the Phillipines are closer to Borneo than I'd thought. It will be interesting to find out what culinary links exist between the two places.

:huh:

I'm perplexed. Talk about Language Puzzles 101.

After consulting the highest authority I know on all things Filipino -- namely, my Mother -- and extensive Googling, we are still perplexed.

Laksa, you're right on the meaning of 'manok' as chicken. Googling the name of this dish comes up with the translation "Curry Chicken with Eggplant".

From what I've found, the words 'iba' and 'talum' are from the Hiligaynon dialect, a dialect similar to Ilonggo. As I type this, my Mom is phoning a friend of hers who happens to be Hiligaynon in the hopes that some light can be shed on this mystery.

The literal translation of the word 'iban' is "other, another, some, the rest". The literal translation of the word 'talum' is "sharp", differentiated from the Tagalog word for eggplant which is "talong". What this has to do with "Curry Chicken with Eggplant"? I have no idea.

:blink:

I'll report back if we get any linguistic assistance. Any Hiligaynons out there?

Joie Alvaro Kent

"I like rice. Rice is great if you're hungry and want 2,000 of something." ~ Mitch Hedberg

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