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Michael Bras Chocolate Coulant


johnny70
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Thanks for posting this.

Sorry everyone - I didn't post mine directly because it was text verbatim from the book and the last time I posted something like that I got some email from the admins saying that I shouldn't do that.

Luckily tan319 found the website version which for some reason is allowed by the admins...

The recipe was too long to change around...

:biggrin:

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Not that this is the best place to explain this, but since new members are continually joining and it comes up from time to time, I'll go over it again:

joesan--your heart was in the right place, but thank you for not posting a lengthy recipe verbatim from a book--that's not considered to be "fair use" by eGullet, which holds to a very stringent standard protecting content creators. What you can do within reason, however, is put a recipe into your own words--using your language--especially if you work from it and are passing along your own comments based on your experiences. In this case, if you were familiar with it, you could have listed the exact amounts from this Bras recipe, said where you got it from, and then conveyed the instructions in your own words--adding things like "these steps seem really convoluted" or "I bake it for x minutes at y degrees instead," etc.

It's a fine line to walk--but think of it this way--you can't quote pages and paragraphs from an article but you can quote selectively and break up the quotes you use with your own content, comment and opinion. Do the same with verbatim recipes and you will be fine.

Does this take more time? Yes, but that's the cost of respect when you operate within a community.

The difference between something in a book and the same recipe on a website is just that--in this case the copyright holder and/or the author has put the recipe on the site and is freely allowing links to it--that's why we usually advise "linking" to a recipe like Ted did or linking to a very long quote or the original article almost always as the most preferable course of action. Realize that if this recipe appeared verbatim on another website--but appeared there in violation of how we interpret copyright or fair use standards--we would not allow a link to it. That might sound tricky: an example--another less serious, less-well-run discussion forum allows their members to reprint entire articles from, say, the NY Times or LA Times willy nilly--which is a clear violation of commonly accepted media standards--and this Michel Bras recipe was in such an article that ran a year ago. Ted, trying to be helpful, Googles to try to find this recipe--and finds that the article was no longer freely available on the Times website anymore--but instead was now in their premium "paid" archive because too much time had passed--but he also finds that the whole article WAS cut and pasted onto this other less professional website. Could he link from eGullet to this other website? No--because eG respects the rights of the original author and publisher in terms of usage. If it were brought to our attention, we'd remove it. If it couldn't be posted here on eG, it usually can't be linked to elsewhere as an "end run" around our policies.

Also, in general, eG pastry forum is not the place to publicly solicit for information (recipes, tips, etc) to then be sent privately--that way no one in the grander sense benefits. The idea behind everything we do here is we're all linked to a common goal: that of raising awareness, sharing and exchanging information publicly. Anything which isn't going to further that goal should be handled privately, and we even provide a mechanism for that--the pm system--but we'd much rather prefer our technology was used to help as many people as possible--by posting and answering and sharing publicly rather than behind the scenes. That way, in the long run, we show professional respect for everyone and we're all bound by weak, but nonetheless shared and respected community bonds. When you respect usage rights and content creation of others, you are respecting yourself.

Any questions or concerns, just ask one of the "admins" of this forum via pm, who while volunteering to lead here are also working professional pastry chefs--content creators--and content interpreters--themselves. It's our responsibility to help guide and we're glad to help.

So tell me, is anyone actually doing this coulant, this way, in the real world?

Steve Klc

Pastry chef-Restaurant Consultant

Oyamel : Zaytinya : Cafe Atlantico : Jaleo

chef@pastryarts.com

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  • 1 year later...

I am trying to track down the creamed rice for this recipe- any ideas?

http://www.allium.uk.net

http://alliumfood.wordpress.com/ the alliumfood blog

"Life should not be a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in an attractive and well preserved body, but rather to skid in sideways, chocolate in one hand, champagne in the other, body thoroughly used up, totally worn out and screaming - Whey hey what a ride!!!, "

Sarah Poli, Firenze, Kibworth Beauchamp

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sorry- not trying to sound stupid, but in UK no-one has heard of it!

Cream of rice is Rice Pudding over here!!!!!!!

We are going to make the chocolate coulant with caramel center as and when we solve the cream of rice mystery! :smile:

http://www.allium.uk.net

http://alliumfood.wordpress.com/ the alliumfood blog

"Life should not be a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in an attractive and well preserved body, but rather to skid in sideways, chocolate in one hand, champagne in the other, body thoroughly used up, totally worn out and screaming - Whey hey what a ride!!!, "

Sarah Poli, Firenze, Kibworth Beauchamp

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like baby rice?

http://www.allium.uk.net

http://alliumfood.wordpress.com/ the alliumfood blog

"Life should not be a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in an attractive and well preserved body, but rather to skid in sideways, chocolate in one hand, champagne in the other, body thoroughly used up, totally worn out and screaming - Whey hey what a ride!!!, "

Sarah Poli, Firenze, Kibworth Beauchamp

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The Cream of Rice is a dry rice cereal, it has the same type of texture as uncooked polenta or cornmeal. In the US it is sold in boxes and you cook it in hot water or milk until thick like a porridge. Maybe you could grind some uncooked rice up in the robocoupe until it is fine like cornmeal or polenta or use rice flour. Hope this is helpful.

Edited by pastrymama (log)

check out my baking and pastry books at the Pastrymama1 shop on www.Half.ebay.com

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We'll give it a try with baby rice, I'll let you see a picture of how we get on!!

many thanks for all the help

Erica

http://www.allium.uk.net

http://alliumfood.wordpress.com/ the alliumfood blog

"Life should not be a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in an attractive and well preserved body, but rather to skid in sideways, chocolate in one hand, champagne in the other, body thoroughly used up, totally worn out and screaming - Whey hey what a ride!!!, "

Sarah Poli, Firenze, Kibworth Beauchamp

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I've tried to find some information before ... but now the topic has come up again I'll ask here :) Heston Blumenthal does a version of this with blue cheese in the centre on one of his videos. He uses very similar ingredients as Michel Bras for the mocca centre ... but no detail on how much blue cheese!

Does anyone have any suggestions on how I could try to replicate based on the recipe link above?

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