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A Plethora of figs !


dockhl
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My neighbor gave me a huge bag of just softening figs (maybe 50?) and I need any and all suggestions !

I usually just have 4-6 from our own tree so I split them, top with a little goat cheese, honey and black pepper and grill. Or use in salads........

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fig newtons?

actually my favorite way to eat figs dried..that way they will last for a while and can be rehydrated for use later..or just eat them as they are..u can also make fig jam..or puree them..(for use later as well)..basically u are only limited by your imagination and taste buds..tyr experimenting with some of them..perhaps as a sauce for lamp or pork... or make some kind of glaze with them..as i said..u are only limited by your imagination...

im a very firm beleiver in experimentation..sometimes it works out..sometimes it doesnt..and every now and then you hit on something that is wildy popular

a recipe is merely a suggestion

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1. Fig and gorgonzola sandwich: toast a slice of sourdough bread lightly. Add 1/2 figs which have been quartered. Put under broiler until the figs are just soft. Add a slice of gorgonzola and replace under broiler until cheese is bubbly.

2. Fig "brulee": Half the figs and place cut side up in a baking dish and sprinkle with cinnamon and honey. Put in hot oven (180C) 15-20 minutes until soft (but not mushy). Add warmed custard to dish. Sprinkle with demerera sugar and place under broiler or blowtorch until a crust forms.

3. Fig and prosciutto pizza (check out the Figs cookbook)

4. Stuffed figs (from Mario Batali's first cookbook)

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1. Fig and gorgonzola sandwich:  toast a slice of sourdough bread lightly.  Add 1/2 figs which have been quartered.  Put under broiler until the figs are just soft.  Add a slice of gorgonzola and replace under broiler until cheese is bubbly.

2.  Fig "brulee": Half the figs and place cut side up in a baking dish and sprinkle with cinnamon and honey.  Put in hot oven (180C) 15-20 minutes until soft (but not mushy).  Add warmed custard to dish.  Sprinkle with demerera sugar and place under broiler or blowtorch until a crust forms.

3.  Fig and prosciutto pizza (check out the Figs cookbook)

4.  Stuffed figs (from Mario Batali's first cookbook)

:wub::wub:

Oh man........!!!

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cut the stem off.

make a little X in the top

stuff with (your favorite) blue cheese

drape in a thin slice of prosciutto

bake at 400 for 8-10 minutes.

gorge yourself :rolleyes:

Nothing is better than frying in lard.

Nothing.  Do not quote me on this.

 

Linda Ellerbee

Take Big Bites

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cut the stem off.

make a little X in the top

stuff with (your favorite) blue cheese

drape in a thin slice of prosciutto

bake at 400 for 8-10 minutes.

gorge yourself :rolleyes:

I can see a pattern developing here ! :raz:

LOL

Yummy!

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A puff pastry tart with fresh goat cheese, prosciutto and quartered figs, sprinkled with fresh thyme and drizzled with a little very good balsamic vinegar. Served with slices of cold and perfectly ripe melon, it's heavenly.

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  • 2 weeks later...

I have some fresh figs that I would like to turn into compote (? relish?) of some sort, with wine or brandy, to serve in a month or so.

The only recipes I can find call for dried figs.

Can I use the fresh fruit and just reduce my liquid longer, or is there some method to dry them first?

Thanks for any guidance.

Agenda-free since 1966.

Foodblog: Power, Convection and Lies

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*Deborah* - You can dry your figs if you want, if you have a dehydrator... or you can also reduce the liquid by drying them in the oven. However, I wouldn't advice to this. You can just make jam. Just remember that figs are amongst the sweetest fruits, so you don't need to add a whole lot of sugar. Other than that, just like you said, cook them until the liquid reduces to your desired consistency

prasantrin - I've never heard of peeling the skin. I never do (and figs are my favorite fruit... I eat them all the time)

My favorite recipes? Bake them for a short time in the oven (with a little salt and maybe some thyme) and eat with duck or any gamey meat.

Or do a light batter (with milk, flour and sugar) and deep fry keeping the oil at a low temperature.

Of course they go great with serrano or prosciutto, and with any kind of blue cheese (my favorite: cabrales)... however, they go nicelly with most cheeses (any grana or a nice manchego would work)

If you're feeling audacious, deep them in liquid caramel and top any cake with them..., so good.

Of course, I like to eat them by themselves, but if you do have a ridiculous amount and thay're gonna rot, then make a nice jam.

Follow me @chefcgarcia

Fábula, my restaurant in Santiago, Chile

My Blog, en Español

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i'm working on a recipe for pickled figs (to go with a fennel and red-onion salad). works really well: equal parts vinegar and water, some sugar, cinnamon, clove, allspice. bring to a boil and simmer 10 minutes. then pour over the figs and let steep. about 1 1/2 hours later, great pickled figs. and they'll keep a while.

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Here's a fig appetizer preparation that we had at the "rehearsal dinner" for Varmint's Second Occassional Pig Pickin at Crook's Corner Restaurant in Chapel Hill, NC:

gallery_2_1704_9903.jpg

Figs wrapped with thin country ham, and then drizzled with a sauce of sour cream, EVOO, mint, vinegar and mustard.

Jason Perlow

Co-Founder, The Society for Culinary Arts & Letters

offthebroiler.com - Food Blog | View my food photos on Instagram

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One of my favorite simple preps for figs from Chez Panisse Desserts:

Assemble a platter of fresh figs, trimmed and respberries. Whip up some heavy cream, flavor with Pernod (sparingly, as it is strong) and sweeten with some sugar. Serve the cream and a crisp cookie alongside the platter. (The figs and raspberries look beautiful together and anise is a very complimerntary flavor to both).

Another nice accompaniement to fresh figs and raspberries is honey mousse.

Edited by ludja (log)

"Under the dusty almond trees, ... stalls were set up which sold banana liquor, rolls, blood puddings, chopped fried meat, meat pies, sausage, yucca breads, crullers, buns, corn breads, puff pastes, longanizas, tripes, coconut nougats, rum toddies, along with all sorts of trifles, gewgaws, trinkets, and knickknacks, and cockfights and lottery tickets."

-- Gabriel Garcia Marquez, 1962 "Big Mama's Funeral"

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Do look here as well. So many good ideas over the years.

"Under the dusty almond trees, ... stalls were set up which sold banana liquor, rolls, blood puddings, chopped fried meat, meat pies, sausage, yucca breads, crullers, buns, corn breads, puff pastes, longanizas, tripes, coconut nougats, rum toddies, along with all sorts of trifles, gewgaws, trinkets, and knickknacks, and cockfights and lottery tickets."

-- Gabriel Garcia Marquez, 1962 "Big Mama's Funeral"

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