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dumplings, wontons and noodles


eatingwitheddie
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WHO IS THIS PROJECT WONDER???

Must be before my time. I'm still a young 'un. :rolleyes:

I can't believe you weren't part of the "project".

Go back to page 3 and check out the Steamed dumpling thread. I dare ya! :raz:

I innocently tried to answer Project's questions, one time. You have to hand it to him, as he really is very earnest in his 'projects'. Not like 'easy-way-out' me!!

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It's past "midnight at the oasis", and I am making siu mai and har gow! :wacko:

Got some new acquaintences passing thru' the city tomorrow, so having dim sum for lunch.

Got 3 doz siu mai made...cooling off in the freezer now. Dough for the har gow is too hot to handle at the moment. So...gotta come on here and gripe a bit. :wink:

I have always made har gow with just whole shrimps. Tonight, or, rather, this morning, I have chopped up some waterchectnuts and the tiniest slivers of ginger. Going to give more crunch and bite.

Have gnow yook yuen in the freezer, will make congee with chicken necks, pick up cruellers at Superstore, and make salmon and veg. summer rolls in the morning.

Where is the cheering section when I need ya? :angry::laugh:

Dejah

www.hillmanweb.com

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Just for you, I've roped in my 3 kids and dog....

Clap your hands everybody,

Everybody, clap your hands!

Sue-On's dumplings are the BEST!

The best in the west!

Here we go!

(DO) clap-down

clap-clap-down

clapdown-clapdown

clap-clap (repeat claps)

p/s I'm amazed at your hospitality. :huh::wub:

Edited by Tepee (log)

TPcal!

Food Pix (plus others)

Please take pictures of all the food you get to try (and if you can, the food at the next tables)............................Dejah

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Just for you, I've roped in my 3 kids and dog....

:huh:  :wub:

The DOG is out of sync! Must be his tail thumping...:angry::laugh:

It's 2 am...Done! Ready for bed. Will have to see how the har gows turn out tomorrow. Hope the guests aren't dim sum gourmands. :rolleyes:

Dejah

www.hillmanweb.com

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Just for you, I've roped in my 3 kids and dog....

:huh:  :wub:

The DOG is out of sync! Must be his tail thumping...:angry::laugh:

It's 2 am...Done! Ready for bed. Will have to see how the har gows turn out tomorrow. Hope the guests aren't dim sum gourmands. :rolleyes:

Tepee! LOL!

Dejah--- I think you must be joshing with us. I'm sure there is not a Dejah here --- a single person, that is. With all you do, there MUST be 2 or more of you posting under one name!!!

Chopping the shrimp, PLUS chopping the w'chestnuts, PLUS slivering the ginger? I hope your guests realize the fuss you went to. Still, the one person to please is you, and if all goes well, you should take a bow.

Any leftovers can be shipped to NJ. I'll pay the postage.

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  • 1 year later...

I have been trying to make lamian (hand pulled noodles) for a while now without much succes. In fact I have only achieved some level of failure.

I have been reying on some information found on the internet in english or chinese quickly translated by my girlfriend.

The best english reference I found was this somewhere else on egullet.

I am hoping to find some complementary information now and thought this forum was probably more appropriate.

One of the key answers thing I am trying to find out is a proper recipe involving a good description of the technique. I have found so much contradictory information that I just do not know where to start anymore.

If you have any cues on what type of North American flour I can use (or flour available in chinese grocery stores), on the water to flour ratio in the dough, on magic ingredients or technique I would really appreciate your input. Also, if you find good descriptions written in Chinese, I am also a taker.

I will keep you updated about my experiments.

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  • 3 weeks later...

Failure again last weekend... :sad: the problem is that my dough strech ok for the first two stretch but then it reaches a point where it becomes very stiff. I wonder if its about tehcnique or recipe/dough.

So far, I achieved my best results with italian 00 flour but I still can't explain why.

I'll try again soon... :wacko:

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not sure which kind you are trying to make exactly.. but these aren't the shaanxi, lanzhou style lamian, which are the most obvious type that come to mind if you say lamian in china. The guys here barely add flour when they fold. They also don't fold it so many times, and they can additionally make them about 3x faster! hah. Remember, that over-added flour will really taint the broth or stir-fry in my opinion. Different use I suppose.

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Isn't it mostly about the "feel" of the dough?  Isn't that why it takes an apprentice months (or years) to master them?

I guess you are right on this... but it does not take months not even years to learn to make moderately thin noodles. I don't think I'll ever be able to make the ultra-thin version but I would be very satisfied to be able to reliably make some kind of noodles this way.

I am also aware that there are a great variety of stretched noodles out there but I believe the technique is still essentially the same. Whether one is talking about the those made by the Uigurs or the Lanzhou lamian the technique looks very similar... oil is replaced by flour here, some alkaline is used there, etc.... at the end the noodles are still hand stretched in a similar fashion... unless I am missing something (which may well be the case). :wacko:

If I can't learn by myself, here in Canada, I will probably try to find someone to teach me in China when I get back there to see the family... :wink:

This is by far the most difficult cooking I have ever tried... I don't know what's the fuss about souffles... this is way harder! :sad:

My girlfriend is encouraging me but I know she secretly laugh at me for trying this.

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Do you have a huge table covered in flour? The noodle pullers I've seen all have a pretty nice set-up and are very liberal with the flour (like the youtube guy).

Good luck. If you figure this out, I'll fly to Ottawa to learn at your feet.

Chris Amirault

eG Ethics Signatory

Sir Luscious got gator belts and patty melts

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  • 2 weeks later...

Dry style beef chow fun has probably been my favorite chinese dish since I was 5, and I want to make this at home somehow. However, I am having a very hard time finding the noodles used for it, at least those of good quality. So I decided that I would actually make it at home.

Does anyone have any recipes I could use to make it at home myself? I have a wok and a steamer tray, some tapioca and rice starch, and that's the extent of what I know what to do. Vietnamese have a dish called "Banh Cuon" where meats and cloud ear are wrapped in a similar noodle sheet. I'm not sure if that's the same exact recipe as chinese style ho fun noodle, but in the meanwhile, any recipe contributed will be greatly appreciated!!

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I don't know how to make it but a while ago in the Home cooking topic, Peony made some. 

What Peony made was "cheung fun". The one that is eaten "as is", with some sweet sauce, soy sauce, sesame sauce and sesame seeds. Though made from rice also, the texture of "cheung fun" is very different from "ho fun". I don't know what the process is for making "ho fun". If you, however, use "cheung fun" for stir-fries, I think the result will greatly disappoint you (too soft, not holding up, falling apart). Just my experience.

W.K. Leung ("Ah Leung") aka "hzrt8w"
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I know some recipes for ho fun include boric acid in its list of ingredients. I think it's to firm up the texture because if you use just plain rice flour then it's very soft. If fresh noodles aren't available I use the dried ones.

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I've tried beef chow fun with dried rice noodles. It just isn't the same, I can't explain why. Perhaps it's the size and thickness. I've seen those "rice flakes" sold at stores and they are about two inch long squares. Not sure how that would turn out.

I'm pretty sure there must be SOME way to make it at home, unless the restaurants I buy from all buy their noodles from manufacturers. I mean, chow fun and chow fun like dishes are practically everywhere, so I don't understand why it's so difficult to find.

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unless the restaurants I buy from all buy their noodles from manufacturers.

BINGO

Most of the restaurants find that the process to be so labour intensive as to deem it counterproductive. Frankly, there is very, very little difference between the inhouse and outsourced noodles in taste and texture. In fact, manufactured ones have more consistency. There are a few (large) specialty noodle restaurants that still make their own, but even they are thinking of outsourcing, according to scuttlebutt.

I remember a small wet, room with a couple of millstones, and a couple of people foot pedalling the millstone, and lots of water being used. I imagine that the rice has to be a special kind and a lot of experience required to judge the fineness of the flour slurry.

Making these types of noodles with packaged rice flour is not the same. Close, but no cigar.

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http://www.mymomsbest.com/daily/index.php/...-laced-noodles/

"Yellow noodles contain the highest amount of boric acid at 70.4%, said the Health Ministry.

Health Minister Datuk Dr Chua Soi Lek said in a recent statement that after yellow noodles is wantan noodles with 14.8% boric acid content, then koay teow, laksa, loh see fun and spring roll with 3.7% each.

Dr Chua: ‘Those who misuse boric acid will be nabbed’

Negri Sembilan recorded the highest percentage of boric acid misuse for food preservation, followed by Perak, Johor, Penang and Selangor.

A person who consumes food with a lot of boric acid could vomit, suffer from dysentery, dermatitis, kidney failure and damage to the blood vessels.

Boric acid is used to preserve wood in the furniture industry and is also used in medication. "

lol

Yea, I generally tend to avoid any food with ingredients that sound like a household cleaner. I might experiment with different flour mixtures and see how they hold up. I have in possession some potato, corn, tapioca, rice, and all purpose flour.

Edited by takadi (log)
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